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Full text of "Annual report of the city of Somerville"

CITY OF SOMERVILLE 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Annual Reports 



1909 



With Mayor's Inaugural Address 
Delivered Jan* 3, J9J0 




SOMERVILLE JOURNAL PRINT 
1910 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



DELIVERED BY 



Mayor John M, Woods 



MONDAY, JANUARY 3, WO 



Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen : — 

I pause at the threshold of the new year to pay a loving 
tribute to the noble characters who have passed from mortal 
sight in the year that is gone, — Quincy E. Dickerman, noble 
citizen, faithful teacher, wise in councils for many years in the 
school board; Mrs. Attwood, earnest, active, and faithful in 
school affairs ; Captain Harrison Aldrich, Comrade James F. 
Davlin, Commander Charles D. Dean, of Post 139, G. A. R., 
true in war, faithful in peace, 

"On Fame's eternal camping-ground their silent tents are 

spread, 
While Glory guards, with solemn round, the bivouac of the 

dead"; 
Charles A. Cushman, noble, generous soul, and man of large 
affairs ; Hon. Francis H. Raymond, faithful public servant and 
honorable citizen ; Rev. Father Galvin, teacher and preacher of 
righteousness for many years ; and William A. Flaherty, re- 
spected as a citizen, honorable as a public servant. "A good 
name is better than great riches, and loving favor than fine 
gold." 

Words are but feeble instruments to express my gratitude 
to the Giver of All Good for His merciful kindness to us as a 



-i AXXFAL REPOKTS. 

municipality and as individuals, and to express to you, mv 
fellow-citizens, my appreciation of the confidence you have 
shown in me in electing me for a second term the chief execu- 
tive of the city. For this high and distinguished honor I 
promise in return the best service I can render. 

The whole civilized world is to-day witnessing a public rec- 
ognition of the fact that the problem of the hour is that of 
municipal life. The frontier problem has been solved, and with 
the solution there has come a backward sweep in the tide of 
people from the country to the city. Xow, as in the early days, 
it is the city that is the heart of the nation, and the city prob- 
lems are the ones that most heavily tax all the powers of 
present-day statesmanship. Population concentrates, and de- 
mands for new requirements of new population grow more in- 
sistent each year. The power of light as a police agent, of the 
beautiful in environment as a civilizing agent, the right of the 
people to aid in the pursuit of happiness, — these are present- 
day problems for us to work out and solve. They will not 
down at any man's or party's bidding. The nearer the people 
are to the government, and the more that are interested in it, 
the better it will be. After all. the government of this city or 
any other is but a reflex of the people's will. Public servants 
want to please the people and carry out their wishes. The mo- 
mentous danger lies in the lethargy of the people. At the city 
election held December li last, forty-four and a fraction of 
every hundred legal voters said by their action : "We have no 
interest in the enforcement of law, and care nothing how the 
money we pay in taxes is expended or who expends it." Take 
no interest in the welfare of your city, and some day you may 
awake to find a corrupt political demagogue in the mayor's 
chair and men of like stamp in your board of aldermen. "Eter- 
nal vigilance is the price of liberty." 

Revision of the City Charter. 

Last vear I submitted to the board of aldermen some 
amendments to the city charter, and asked not only their co- 
operation, but that of the people, to secure from the legislature 
these changes. The effort was fruitless, as neither aldermen 
nor people co-operated with me. I shall not renew the appeal 
to the legislature, believing it would be useless, but I should be 
false to myself, to the high office I hold, and to the people, if I 



MAYOR S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 5 

did not, with all the earnestness and emphasis possible, urge 
upon you to take immediate steps towards a revision of the city 
charter. A year's experience has fully demonstrated to me its 
incongruities and inconsistencies, and its inadaptability to 
present-day needs. It was the best thought of the men who 
framed it, was adapted to that time, and was a vast improvement 
over the old one, but time and experience have proved to me 
that it is not in line with the best municipal thought of to-day. 
Many of the good business rules and methods of ten years ago 
are to-day discarded as obsolete. Much of the legislation en- 
acted ten years ago is either repealed or amended almost be- 
yond recognition. If you desire the city to be managed hon- 
estly and according to the best business methods, changes in 
the charter are imperative to make it possible. I believe it 
well worth the experiment to elect the mayor and aldermen for 
two years or more, and that the board of aldermen be reduced 
to seven or nine, and all elected at large, and to have all mat- 
ters considered in committee of the whole. Then each one 
would be in touch with the needs of the whole city. I believe 
it would result in electing broader and better men, and they 
would realize their responsibility to the whole city, rather than 
to the ward where their domicile is. I have dwelt somewhat at 
length on this subject, believing it of vastly more importance 
than the details of the methods of departments, or the history 
of what has been accomplished the past year. 

City Departments. 

The several departments of the city are, generally speak- 
ing, in good condition. The changes made in the heads of the 
police and electric lines and lights departments have proved 
most satisfactory, and both departments have been brought up 
to a high degree of efficiency. 

Chief Hopkins, for thirty-seven years the head of the fire 
department, and for more than a half-century a respected citi- 
zen and able fire-fighter, retires at his own request. I hope to 
place a man at the head of this department who will bring it to 
such a state of efficiency and discipline that no just criticism 
can be made against it. By the granting to the firemen of one 
day off in six, instead of one day off in eight, an unnecessary 
burden has been laid upon the tax-payers, with no benefit to 



6 ' ANNUAL REPORTS. 

the men, and a permanent injury to the city. I am pleased at 
the general approval of my veto of this matter. 

The highway department is not in a satisfactory condition. 
For many years there has been a good deal of complaint from 
many of our citizens at the way in which it has been managed. 
The facts fully warrant this dissatisfaction. Owing to circum- 
stances entirely beyond my control, and against my best judg- 
ment, I re-appointed the head of this department. There was 
no other alternative. Owing to the strained relations existing 
the first of the year between the executive and legislative 
branches of the government, it was an impossibility to put any 
other man in his place. What could not be cured must, of 
necessity, be endured. The city's business could not be allowed 
to suffer, so I did the only thing that could be done under the 
circumstances. The revelations of dishonesty in this depart- 
ment are known to all. Early in the year I called the attention 
of the commissioner to the man now serving sentence for pad- 
ding the pay-rolls, saying that I believed him both incompetent 
and dishonest. He was under civil service, and could not be 
touched without specific charges and proof. Although dis- 
honesty in this department may have ceased, incompetency, 
waste, and favoritism still continue. There should be a new, 
competent head of this department. Last year I pointed out 
the only safe and sure remedy for the present condition of mat- 
ters, which,, if it had been adopted, would have resulted in a 
department run along business lines and in a great saving to 
the city. 

Licenses. 

For this year, as formerly, the city has declared in an em- 
phatic manner that intoxicating liquors shall not be sold. 
While I believe that most of the druggists are honorable men 
and intend to obey the law, the facts show that some do not. 
I believe the city will not suffer if a less number of licenses of 
this class is granted. There is no privilege granted by your 
honorable board that I believe is so much abused as that 
granted to expressmen to transport liquors into the city. The 
books of a number of them show that they are substantially 
agents for Boston liquor firms. I believe the number of these 
permits ought to be materially decreased, and that no harm 
would come to the city if none were granted, 



MAYOR S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 7 

There has been a large increase in the applications for 
common victuallers' licenses. I am satisfied that some could 
not readily furnish a meal of victuals. Some of them, I am 
satisfied, want a license so they can keep open Sundays. 

I renew the request of last year that the committee on 
licenses give the closest scrutiny to all applicants, especially 
druggists, liquor expresses, common victuallers, and junk ped- 
lers and dealers. I shall use all the means in my power to en- 
force all the laws and ordinances. 

Playgrounds. 

A good beginning has been made the past year in the mat- 
ter of playgrounds. What has been done appears to meet the 
approval of the most of our citizens. The good work should 
be continued, especially for the benefit of the younger children. 

New Bridges. 

The street and bridges over the Somerville-avenue cross- 
ing of the railroad tracks and the Lowell-street bridges and ap- 
proaches will be completed at an early date. I recommend that 
the completion of these long-desired and much-needed improve- 
ments be recognized officially in a proper manner. 

Alewife Brook. 

A bill is before the legislature to make the centre of the 
new location of Alewife brook the dividing line between Som- 
erville and the cities and towns on the other side. I commend 
this bill to your hearty endorsement and support. It is be- 
lieved there will be a bill introduced in the legislature to change 
the name of Alewife brook to Menotomy river. I believe this 
city ought to oppose this change of name by every means pos- 
sible. This brook by this name is a part of our history and 
traditions. 

New Athletic Field. 

In this connection, it is understood that the metropolitan 
park commission will turn back to the city quite a tract of land 
along the banks of this brook. The agreement between Tufts 
college and the city for the Broadway athletic field will soon 
terminate. As I said last year, I believe in good, clean athletic 
sports and in having a suitable, well-equipped place for them 
I recommend that preliminary steps be taken to secure land for 



8 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

this purpose. As an eyewitness of most of the important 
games played on the Broadway field, I have yet to learn of any 
one complaining- of the price of the tickets, or that they did not 
get their money's worth. Such a field, open to the public when 
not needed for school athletic purposes, would prove a great 
blessing. I make no apology to anybody for being a baseball 
and football enthusiast, and I hope to see Somerville have 
teams that will do them all up, like Somerville did Waltham 
last year. 

Metropolitan Boulevard. 

The joint commission on metropolitan improvements has 
had several hearings on the matter of a boulevard through 
Somerville and Cambridge, connecting the north and south 
park systems. Our city was most ably represented at these 
hearings by Alderman Shepard, in charge, City Solicitor Kaan, 
and many others. I am in hopes the commission will report 
favorably. I ask your earnest support, and that of all our citi- 
zens, to secure this greatly-needed connecting link, which can- 
not fail to be of immense value to our city. 

Care of the Streets. 

It seems good judgment to pursue the same policy towards 
the streets as last year, giving the greatest attention to the 
main thoroughfares, especially Somerville avenue. A number 
of the streets have been treated with binding and dust-laying 
preparations, saving the street and lessening the dust. I be- 
lieve it wise to continue to use the preparations on streets that 
are in good condition. "Cleanliness is next to godliness." 
The streets are the living-rooms and show-windows of the city, 
used and seen by all the people and the strangers within our 
gates, — if clean and wholesome, a pleasure and benefit to all; 
if dirty and littered, an eyesore to everybody, a menace to 
health, and a disgrace to the city. 

Our Water- Front. 

The bathhouse and shelter on Mystic river have proved a 
great success. I hope to see some steps taken to secure for all 
time this water-front for the use of our people. What has been 
done by the legislature for Revere, Lynn, and Swampscott I 
believe we should ask the legislature to do for Somerville, 
Later I hope to make some specific recommendations in rela- 



MAYOR S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 9 

tion to increased facilities, so as to make this a popular and 

safe resort. 

Police Court. 

There is imperative need of additional room and accommo- 
dations for the transaction of the business of this court, and for 
the preservation of its records. Plans have been drawn by the 
building commissioner for such changes and improvements as 
seem to be necessary. These are ready for examination at the 
convenience of the court. 

Financial Condition of the City. 

The city is in a sound financial condition, and its credit 
excellent. All bills are paid, and a substantial balance is in the 
treasury. All the facts and figures relating to the debt, receipts, 
and expenditures are a part of this address which I commend 
to the thoughtful consideration of every tax-payer. 

The total funded debt of the city January 1, 1909, was 
$1,466,500. This debt was increased during the year $190,000. 
It was decreased $153,500, leaving the net funded debt January 
1, 1910, $1,503,000, an increase of $36,500. 

The total amount of taxable property is $63,658,953.20, of 
which $57,295,600 is real estate and $6,363,353.20 is personal es- 
tate. At a rate of $18.60 on each $1,000 of valuation, the tax 
is $1,184,056.53. There are 21,191 polls at $2, making $42,382. 
Amount assessed for street sprinkling, $30,677.25, and for the 
suppression of gypsy and brown-tail moths, $1,649.41 ; on non- 
resident bank shares to be paid to the state, $1,379.13, making 
a total tax levy of $1,260,144.32. Total number of persons as- 
sessed, resident and non-resident, was 29,007. 

Of the amount of the tax levy, $220,000 is required for the 
debt provisions ;. $210,731.53 are state and county taxes, met- 
ropolitan district assessments, overlay and abatement, etc., mat- 
ters over which the city has no control; $417,500 is used for 
current expenses of departments,, over which the board of al- 
dermen has no control ; $335,825 is the amount for current ex- 
penses within control of the board of aldermen. 

The same statement based upon $18.60 per thousand is as 
follows: Of each $18.60, $3.31 is for state, county, and metro- 
politan taxes and overlay and abatement; $3.45 for debt re- 
quirements ; $6.57 for current expenses over which the board 
of aldermen has no control; $5.27 for current expenses within 
control of the board of aldermen. 



10 ANNUAL KEPORTS. 

In addition to the amount received from taxes, there was 
available last year the sum of $223,094.29 on water income ac- 
count; we received $35,184.68 from corporation and bank 
taxes ; from the clerk of the courts, $2,321 ; from the county 
treasurer, for dog licenses, $3,796.11 ; from the state, the street 
railway tax, $45,778.32 ; from the Boston Elevated railway tax, 
$9,236.99.; a total of $319,411.39, making- the total amount 
available from these sources and from taxes $1,579,555.71. 

Funded Debt.— The funded debt of the city January 1, 1909, 
was as follows : — 

City Loan $1,058,500 00 

Sewer Loan 305,000 00 

Paving Loan 20,000 00 

Water Loan 62,000 00 

Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan . 21,000 00 

$1,466,500 00 

The debt was increased during the year by appropriations 
made by the board of aldermen as follows : — 

Highways Construction .... $80,000 00 
Highways Construction, Lowell Street 

Bridges 40,000 00 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings, 8,000 00 
Public Buildings Construction, Building 

■ Public Buildings . . . . ' . 20,000 00 

Sewers Construction . . . . . 30,000 00 

Sidewalks Construction .... 12,000 00 

$190,000 00 

The debt was reduced during the year by maturities as fol- 
lows : — 

City Loan $125,500 00 

Sewer Loan 16,000 00 

Paving Loan 5,000 00 

Water Loan 6,000 00 

Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan . 1,000 00 



$153,500 00 



Leaving the funded debt of the city January 1, 1910, 
$1,503,000 (an increase of $36,500 over the previous year), clas- 
sified as follows : — = ' 



mayor's inaugural address. 11 

City Loan bonds bearing interest at 3*/& 

per cent $364,000 00 

City Loan bonds bearing interest at 4 

per cent 689,000 00 

City Loan Sewer bonds bearing interest 

at 3% per cent 96,000 00 

City Loan Sewer bonds bearing interest 

at 4 per cent 221,000 00 

City Loan Sewer bonds bearing interest 

at 4y 2 per cent 2,000 00 

City Loan Paving bonds bearing interest 

at 4 per cent 15,000 00 

Water Loan bonds bearing interest at 4 

per cent 56,000 00 

Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan 
bonds bearing interest at 3% per 
cent 20,000 00 

Lowell Street Bridge Loan bonds bear- 
ing interest at 3^ per cent. . . 40,000 00 

Total Funded Debt January 1, 1910 . $1,503,000 00 

The foregoing amount represents the net indebtedness of 
the city, the unfunded liabilities for the temporary loans, etc., 
being equaled by its assets, which consist of uncollected taxes, 
sewer and sidewalk assessments, etc. 

Taxes. — The assessors' warrant for the tax levy assessed 
upon the polls and estates of the inhabitants, as of May 1, 1909, 
was duly submitted to the collector. 

The total amount of taxable property, not including non- 
resident bank shares, was $63,658,953.20, and the rate estab- 
lished was $18.60 on each $1,000 valuation, as follows: — 

Real estate, valuation $57,295,600 00 

Personal estate, valuation .... 6,310,100 00 
Resident bank shares 53,253 20 



Total valuation $63,658,953 20 

At a rate of $18.60 on each $1,000 valua- 
tion $1,184,056 53 

Non-resident bank shares, $74,146.80 at 

$18.60 1,379 13 

Polls, 21,191 at $2 . . . . 42,382 00 



Amount carried forward , , , $1,227,817 66 



12 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward 
Street sprinkling . 
Suppression of gypsy and brown 
tail moths 

Total amount of tax levy . 

Total number of persons assessed 

resident and non-resident, 29,007 



$1,227,817 66 
30,677 25 

1,649 41 
$1,260,144 32 



Appropriations. — The amount of revenue provided by the 
tax levy may properly be classified as follows : — 



Rate 

assessed 

on §1,000 

valuation. 



Amount. 



For current expenses within the 
control of the board of 
aldermen .... 

Current expenses of depart- 
ments over which the 
board of aldermen has 
no control 

Debt requirements . 

State and county taxes, met- 
ropolitan sewer and park 
assessments, and Overlay 
account .... 



$5.27 $335,825 00 



6.57 
3.45 



417,500 00 
220,000 00 



3.31 210,731 53 



Total amount assessed on a valua- 
tion of $63,658,953.20 at . $18.60 $1,184,056 53 



Non-resident bank shares ... % 
Poll taxes assessed, credited to state and 

county 

Street sprinkling 

Suppression of gypsy and brown-tail 

moth tax 



Total amount of tax levy 



1,379 13 

42,382 00 
30,677 25 

1,649 41 
. $1,260,144 32 



The appropriations to the various accounts were as fol- 
lows : — 

ACCOUNTS WITHIN THE CONTROL OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Assessors 
City Auditor 
City Clerk 
City Engineer 
City Messenger 
City Solicitor 

Amount carried forward 



$11,000 00 

725 00 

6,000 00 

11,500 00 

2,000 00 

2,450 00 

$33,675 00 



MAYOR'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



13 



Amount brought forward 

City Treasurer 

Clerk of Committees and Departments 

Contingent Fund 

Election Expenses, City Clerk . 
Election Expenses, Commissioner o 

Public Buildings .... 
Election Expenses, Pay of Election 

Officers 

Election Expenses, Registrars of Voters 

Electrical Department 

Executive Department 

Fire Department .... 

Highways, Suppression of Elm Leaf 

Beetle 

Highways, Suppression of Gypsy and 

Brown-tail Moths 
Inspection of Buildings 

Military Aid 

Police 

Printing and Stationery 

Public Buildings Maintenance, City 

Buildings 

Public Buildings Maintenance, Fire De 

partment 

Public Buildings Maintenance, Janitors 

Salaries 

Public Buildings Maintenance, School 

houses 

Public Grounds 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Soldiers' Relief 

Somerville Hospital . . 

Street Lights 

Total amount assessed on a valuation 
of $63,658,953.20 at $5.27 



$33,675 00 
9,700 00 
4,800 00 
2,500 00 
1,900 00 

1,000 00 

2,600 00 

1,700 00 

8,500 00 

4,000 00 

38,000 00 

1,000 00 



3,800 00 


4,450 00 


900 00 


45,000 00 


750 00 


11,000 00 


5,000 00 



30,000 00 

34,000 00 
11,750 00 

1,800 00 
23,000 00 

5,000 00 
50,000 00 

$335,825 00 



ACCOUNTS OVER WHICH THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN HAS NO CONTROL. 

Health Department $8,000 00 

Health Department, Collection of Ashes 

and Offal 50,000 00 

Health Department, Contagious Disease 

Hospital 1,000 00 



Amount carried forward 



$59,000 00 



14 



ANNUAL KEPOttTS. 



Amount brought forward . . . $59,000 00 
Health Department, Medical Inspection 

in Public Schools 1,500 00 

Public Library 16,000 00 

Public Library, West Somerville Branch, 2,500 00 

School Contingent . . . . . 27,000 00 

School Teachers' Salaries .... 295,000 00 

Support of Poor, City Home . . . 3,000 00 

Support of Poor, Miscellaneous . . 13,500 00 

Total amount assessed on a valua- 
tion of $63,658,953.20 at $6.57 . $417,500 00 

ACCOUNTS PROVIDING FOR DEBT REQUIREMENTS. 

Interest $75,000 00 

Reduction of Funded Debt . . . 145,000 00 

i — ~~ — —— 
Total amount assessed on a valua- 
tion of $63,658,953.20 at $3.45 . $220,000 00 



PROVIDING FOR STATE AND COUNTY TAXES, ETC. 



State Tax .... $78,930 00 

Deduct one-half of poll taxes, 21,191 00 



County Tax . 

Deduct one-half of poll taxes, 



$67,627 10 
21,191 00 



Metropolitan Sewer Assessment 
Metropolitan Park Assessment 
Overlay and Abatement 
Grade Crossing Tax . 
Wellington Bridge Tax 

Total amount assessed on a valuation 
of $63,658,953.20 at $3.31 

Collected for State on non-resident bank 
shares 



$57,739 00 

46,436 10 
56,184 31 
31,639 44 
10,552 53 
2,443 07 
5,737 08 

$210,731 53 

1,379 13 
$212,110 66 



In addition to the above, the following appropriations were 
made from the various income accounts : — 

From the income of the water works : — 



Water Maintenance . . $30,000 00 
Less unexpended balance . 4,265 23 

Water Loan Interest 



$25,734 77 
2,460 00 



Amount carried forward 



,194 77 



MAYOR S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 

Amount brought forward . . . $28,194 77 
Reduction of Funded Debt, Water Loan 

Bonds 6,000 00 

Metropolitan Water Assessment . . 112,573 20 
Water Works Extension . $15,000 00 
Less unexpended balance . 801 92 



lfc 



14,198 08 

Sewers Maintenance 12,000 00 

Fire Department 38,000 00 

Reduction of Funded Debt . . . 12,128 24 



$223,094 29 



From the income from the state and county : — 

Police, the amount received from the state 

for corporation taxes .... $31,775 39 

Police, the amount received from the state 

for bank taxes . 3,409 29 

Police, the amount received from the 

clerk of the courts for fines, costs, etc. 2,321 00 

Public Library, the amount received from 

the county for dog licenses . . 3,796 11 

Highways Maintenance, from street rail- 
way tax 45,778 32 

Highways Maintenance, from Boston 

Elevated Railway tax . . . . 9,236 99 



Total $96,317 10 

Total from water income and from 

state and county .... $319,411 39 



The aggregate appropriations from tax levy and from in- 
come were as follows : — 

From tax levy $1,260,144 32 

From income 319,411 39 



$1,579,555 71 



16 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



The following tables, giving a condensed history of the city's 
finances, are herewith presented for reference : — 













Tax Rate 












per $1,000 






Amount 


Increase 


Reduction 


Valuation 






of 


of 


of 


on Account 




Year. 


Funded 


Funded 


Funded 


of Reduc- 






Debt. 


Debt. 


Debt. 


tion of 
Funded 
Debt. 


Town . 


• • • • • 


$593,349 








Dec. 31 


, 1872 . 




643,354 


$50,005 


# # 




«« 


1873 , 




809,354 


166,000 


. . 




tt 


1874 . 




1,419,854 


610,500 


, , 




tt 


1875 . 




1,571,854 


152,000 


. . 




a 


1876 . 




1,606,854 


45,000 


*$55,130 62 


$2 07 


u 


1877 . 




1,606,854 


10,000 


*58,828 58 


2 30 


tt 


1878 . 




1,596,854 




61,004 64 


2 91 


tt 


1879 . 




1,585,000 








64,915 76 


3 42 


u 


1880 . 




1,585,000 








55,739 35 


2 72 


a 


1881 . 




1,585,000 








58,498 64 


2 59 


tt 


1882 . 




1,585,000 








61,390 59 


2 65 


tt 


1883 . 




1,585,000 








64,479 01 


2 70 


n. 


1884 . 




1,585,000 








67,719 33 


2 78 


tt 


1885 . 




tl,525,000 








71,305 66 


2 87 


a 


1886 . 




1,525,000 








66,894 23 


2 57 


tt 


1887 . 




1,525,000 








70,252 88 


2 56 


tt 


1888 . 




t860,500 


25,000 


37.000 00 


1 28 


it 


1889 . , 




952,500 


130,000 


• 38,000 00 


1 27 


it 


1890 . . 




1,057,500 


150,000 


45,000 00 


1 38 


tt 


1891 . , 




1,045,500 


45,000 


57,000 00 


1 55 


tt 


1892 . . 




1,194,500 


253,000 


104,000 00 


2 73 


a 


1893 . 




1,279,500 


222,000 


137,000 00 


3 27 


a 


1894 . . 




1,344,500 


172,000 


107,000 00 


2 42 


tt 


1895 . , 




1,506,500 


247,000 


85,000 00 


1 83 


tt 


1896 . 




1,531,000 


177,000 


152,500 00 


3 11 


tt 


1897 . , 




1,548,000 


167,000 


150,000 00 


2 39 


tt 


1898 . , 




1,552,000 


176,000 


172,000 00 


3 99 


it 


1899 . . 




1,492,500 


110,000 


169,500 00 


3 30 


It 


1900 . . 




1,478,000 


152,000 


166,500 00 


3 17 


<< 


1901 . . 




1,461,000 


146,000 


163,000 00 


3 02 


it 


1902 . . 




1,477,000 


175,000 


159,000 00 


2 86 


tt 


1903 . . 




1,505,500 


197,500 


169,000 00 


2 96 


tt 


1904 . . 




1,498,500 


132,500 


139,500 00 


2 40 


tt 


1905 . 




1,510,000 


148,000 


136,500 00 


2 30 


tt 


1906 . 




1,464,500 


100,000 


145,500 00 


2 41 


tt 


1907 . 




1,508,000 


198,000 


154,500 00 


2 51 


tt 


1908 . 




1,466,500 


110,000 


151,500 00 


2 06 


<{ 


1909 . 




1,503,000 


190,000 


153,500 00 


2 42 



*$10,000 applied to payment of bonds ; balance to sinking funds. 
tSinking fund applied. 



mayor's inaugural address. 



17 



r EAR. 


Valuation. 


Tax Levy. 


1872 . . 


. $22,755,325 . . 


. $274,374 45 


1873 . . 


. 29,643,100 . . 


. 389,214 48 


1874 . . 


. 30,837,700 . . 


. 473,235 50 


1875 . . 


. 31,317,000 . . 


. 518,161 40 


1876 . . 


. 26,573,400 . . 


. 504,475 24 


1877 . . 


. 25,479,400 . . 


. 471,789 14 


1878 . . 


. 20,976,900 . . 


. 409,497 10 


1879 . . 


. 18,950,100 . . 


. 352,553 80 


1880 . . 


. 20,458,100 . . 


. 402,927 71 


1881 . . 


. 22,569,100 . . 


. 452,945 45 


1882 . . 


. 23,162,200 . . 


. 425,721 16 


1883 . . 


. 23,812,900 . . 


. 411,645 43 


1884 . . 


. 24,331,100 . . 


. 418,750 26 


1885 . . 


. 24,878,400 . . 


. 428,605 44 


1886 . . 


. 26,003,200 . , 


. 416,987 28 


1887 . , 


. 27,471,800 . . 


. 424,309 14 


1888 . , 


. 28,765,400 . . 


. 421,458 60 


1889 . . 


. 30,004,600 . . 


. 440,324 40 


1890 . 


. 32,557,500 . . 


. 447,704 00 


1891 . 


, . 36,843,400 . , 


. 539,137 10 


1892 . . 


. 38,093,100 . . 


. 596,357 50 


1893 . 


. 41,873,600 . . 


. 675,886 80 


1894 . 


. . 44,142,900 . 


. . 721,165 54 


1895 . 


. . 46,506,300 . 


, . 745,609 02 


1896 . 


. 49,070,800 . 


. 786,412 32 


1897 . 


. . 50,231,000 . 


. . 913,574 42 


1898 . 


, . 50,739,700 . 


. . 954,187 11 


1899 . 


. . 51,262,400 . 


. 882,580 96 


1900 . 


. . 52,578,200 . 


. . 889,916 08 


1901 . 


. . 53,924,200 . 


, . 907,439 82 


1902 . 


. . 55,558,300 . 


. . 964,535 80 


1903 . , 


. 57,062,000 . 


. 1.038,849 84 


1904 . . 


. 58,137,900 . 


. 1,059,292 56 


1905 . 


. 59,233,000 . . 


. 1,144,000 14 


1906 . . 


. 60,371,500 . , 


. 1,114,023 62 


1907 . 


. . 61,627,200 . 


, . 1,144,434 92 


1908 . 


. . 63,158,400 . 


. . 1,237,694 72 


1909 . 


. . 63,658,953 20 


. . 1,260,144 32 



Rate. 



$13 00 


12 80 


15 00 


16 20 


18 60 


18 10 


19 00 


18 00 


19 10 


19 50 


17 80 


16 70 


16 60 


16 60 


15 40 


14 80 


14 00 


14 00 


14 00 


14 00 


15 00 


15 50 


15 70 


15 40 


15 40 


17 30 


17 90 


16 30 


16 00 


15 90 


16 40 


17 20 


17 20 


18 30 


17 40 


17 40 


18 40 


18 60 



18 AiSTNTTAL REPORTS. 



Industrial Education. 



Upon my request, the committee on industrial education of 
the school board has made a most careful investigation of this 
subject, and has submitted a most interesting, instructive, and 
exhaustive report, which I hope will be published in full. The 
conclusion reached coincides with my own — that there is a de- 
mand for this kind of education sufficient to warrant a begin- 
ning being made. While all the experts do not agree upon the 
methods to be adopted, they do substantially agree upon the 
necessity of a change in our educational methods to meet what 
the present system lacks, namely, vocational training in its best 
and highest sense. I hope to see the experiment tried, even 
if in a small way, as I believe it the beginning of a new era for 
the better in education. 

The Two Branches of tho Government. 

There appears to have been some misunderstanding or 
misapprehension the past year on the part of some of the alder- 
men as to the powers and duties of both branches of the city 
government. There is no necessity for this, as the charter is 
clear and explicit : — 

Section 2. The administration of the fiscal, prudential, 
and municipal affairs of said city shall be vested in an executive 
department, to consist of the mayor, and a legislative depart- 
ment, to consist of a single body, to be called the board of al- 
dermen. The executive department shall never exercise any 
legislative power, and the legislative department shall never 
exercise any executive power. 

Section 20. The executive powers of the city shall be 
vested solely in the mayor, and may be exercised by him either 
personally or through the several officers and boards in their 
respective departments, under his general supervision and con- 
trol. 

Section 25. The mayor shall cause the laws, ordinances, 
and orders for the government of the city to be enforced. 

Section 26. The mayor shall have the sole power to sign, 
seal, and execute all deeds, leases, agreements, contracts, and 
papers on behalf of the city. 

Section 44. Every department except the school board 
shall at all times be accountable to the mayor for the proper 
discharge of their duties. 



mayor's inaugural address. 19 

Section 49. No member of a committee of the board of 
aldermen shall directly or indirectly take part in the employ- 
ment of labor, the expenditure of public money, the making of 
contracts, the purchase of materials or supplies, the construc- 
tion, alteration, or repair of any public work or other property, 
or in the care, custody, or management of the same, or in the 
conduct of the executive or administrative business of the city. 

The executive has not, and will not, meddle or interfere 
with the legislative, and will respectfully insist that the legis- 
lative shall not with the executive. There should be the 
heartiest co-operation between them. I made this request in 
good faith last year, and renew it this year. It appears to me 
that every member of your honorable board must fully realize 
that the people have held, and do hold, the mayor responsible, 
and very properly so, for the city charter, as I have said to you, 
is emphatic and unequivocal. I accept this responsibility, with 
all that it implies, and I submit to you, as fair-minded men, is 
it fair to the executive, or just to the city, to refuse, as was done 
last year, to confirm some appointments because others were not 
made, unless there are good and substantial reasons therefor? 
Every appointment made last year, with the exception hereto- 
fore noted, was, and all that will be made this year will be sub- 
jected to the closest scrutiny, so as to get the best men possible. 
As I have said, being alone responsible for the conduct and 
management of every department in the city, except the school 
department, I ought to have men at the head in whose ability 
and integrity I have confidence. "A house divided against itself 
cannot stand," neither can any man serve two masters. If 
any head of a department feels that his appointment is forced 
upon the executive by the board of aldermen, or that he is se- 
cure in his position by their favor, it needs no prophet to tell 
what happens, — he snaps his fingers at the executive, to whom 
he is made responsible by the charter, and caters to and obeys 
those by whose power or favor he is put or kept in his position. 

Commendation of Department Heads. 

It is an impossibility for the executive to exercise more 
than a careful, general supervision of the different departments. 
The details and methods must be worked out by the head of 
each. Criticism has been made when and where it seemed 
necessary. On the other hand, I should do violence to my own 



£0 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

sense of justice if I did not bestow praise where it is justly due. 
This city is most fortunate in having- such men as City Clerk 
Cook, City Engineer Bailey, City Treasurer Pike, Building 
Commissioner Littlefield, Chairman Perkins, of the assessors, 
Clerk of Committees Mitchell, Chief of Police Kendall, Com- 
missioner Fuller, of the electric lines and lights, Water Com- 
missioner Merrill, Superintendent Clark, of the schools, Sam 
Walter Foss, of the library, and dear old Jairus Mann, the city 
messenger, — splendid men all, honest, earnest, able, and sincere 
in giving the city the best service they can render. I am glad, 
in their presence and yours, to publicly thank them all for their 
faithful work as heads of departments, and for their uniform 
kindness, courtesy, and valuable assistance to the executive. 

The people have elected you to legislate, the mayor to exe- 
cute. Let each one of us solemnly dedicate ourselves to the 
work before us, to the end that the city may be clean and sound, 
morally, physically, and financially — a pride to all our citizens 
and an exemplar to all the world. 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR 

OF TAXES. 



Treasurer's Office, February 10, 1910. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen : The undersigned presents herewith the thirty- 
eighth annual report of the financial condition of the city, and 
a statement showing, in detail, the receipts and disbursements 
for the year ending December 31, 1909. 

Public Property. 

The value of the public property of the city December 31, 
1908, was $5,302,083.08. The property acquired during the 
year was as follows : — 

Addition to Contagious Disease Hospital .... $4,062 40 

Bath House Addition 1,362 03 

High School Building . 828 00 

Public Library, West Somerville Branch: — 

Expended in 1908 $14,867 50 

Expended in 1909 10,582 02 

25,449 52 

Sewers, Construction 12,846 03 

Water Works Extension 14,198 08 

$58,746 06 
Total public property December 31, 1909, $5,360,829.14. 

Funded Debt. 

The funded debt December 31, 1908, as per Table B of the 
last annual report, was $1,466,500. 

The debt was increased during the year by appropriations 
as follows : — 

Highways, Construction $30,000 00 

Highways Construction, Lowell Street Bridges . . 40,000 00 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings .... 8,000 00 

Public Buildings Construction, Building Public Buildings, 20,000 00 

Sewers, Construction 30,000 00 

Sidewalks, Construction 12,000 00 

Total amount of appropriations on Funded Debt 
account $190,000 00 

To provide for the above-mentioned appropriations, 
coupon bonds to the amount of $190,000 at 3^ per cent, were 
issued, viz. : — 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 3726 to 3736, parable 1910 . . $11,000 00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 3737 to 3747, payable 1911 . . 11,000 00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 3748 to 3758, payable 1912 . . 11,000 00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 3759 to 3769, payable 1913 . . 11,000 00 



Amount carried forward $44,000 00 



22 



AXXUAL REPOKTS. 



$44,000 00 


11,000 00 


11,000 


00 


11,000 


00 


11,000 00 


11,000 


00 


11,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 



Amount brought forward 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 3770 to 3780, payable 1914 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 37S1 to 3791, payable 1915 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 3792 to 3802, payable 1916 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 3803 to 3813, payable 1917 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 3S14 to 3824, payable 1918 

Citv Loan Bonds Nos. 3825 to 3835, payable 1919 

City Loan Bond No. 3836, payable 1920 . 

Citv Loan Bond No. 3837, payable 1921 

City Loan Bond No. 3838, payable 1922 . 

City Loan Bond No. 3839, payable 1923 . 

City Loan Bond No. 3840, payable 1924 . 

City Loan Bond No. 3841, payable 1925 

City Loan Bond No. 3842, payable 1926 . 

City Loan Bond No. 3843, payable 1927 . 

City Loan Bond No. 3844, payable 1928 

City Loan Bond No. 3845, payable 1929 . 

Sewer Loan Bonds Nos. 469 to 498, payable 1910 to 1939, 30,000 00 

Lowell Street Bridge Loan Bonds Nos. 1 to 40, payable 

1910 to 1949 40,000 00 

Total amount of bonds issued in 1909 .... $190,000 00 

Coupon bonds were exchanged for registered bonds during 

the year, as follows : — 

Sewer Loan Bonds, issue of 1909 . . . ... . $5,000 00 

Lowell Street Bridge Loan Bonds, issue of 1909 . . 5,000 00 

Citv Loan Bonds, issue of 1900 1,000 00 

City Loan Bonds, issue of 1907 3,000 00 



The following bonds became due during the y 

City Loan Bond No. Reg. 114, interest 3% per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3519 to 3529, interest 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3646 to 3652, interest 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 1698 to 1703, interest 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 1963 to 1976, interest 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bond No. Reg. 171, interest 4 per cent. . 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2326 to 2330, interest 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2466 to 2470, interest 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2585 to 2591, interest 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2716 to 2725, interest 3% per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2833 to 2839, interest 3% per cent. 
City Loan Bond No. Reg. 163, interest 3% per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3065 to 3073, interest 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3226 to 3233, interest 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bond No. 3234. interest 4 per cent. . 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3444 to 3451, interest 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3160 to 3161, interest 4 per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bond No. Reg. 132, interest 'BV2 per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bond No. Reg. 19, interest 4 per cent. . 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 439, interest 4 per cent. . 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 68, interest 4 per cent. . 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 185, interest 4 per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 209, interest 4 per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 231, interest 'SV2 per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bond No. Reg. 167, interest 3^ per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 284, interest 4 per cent. 

Amount carried forward 



$14,000 00 


rear: — 


$9,000 00 


11,000 00 


7,000 00 


6,000 00 


14,000 00 


8,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


7,000 00 


10,000 00 


7,000 00 


9,000 00 


9,000 00 


8,000 00 


500 00 


8,000 00 


2,000 00 


1.000 00 


2,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


. $135,500 00 



$135,500 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


3,000 


00 


5,000 00 


1,000 


00 


3,000 00 


2,000 


00 


1,000 


00 



REPORT OF TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 23 

Amount brought forward 

Sewer Loan Bond No. 308, interest 4 per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 361, interest 4 per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 51, interest A.V2 per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bonds Nos. 123 to 125, interest 4 per cent. . 
Paving Loan Bonds Nos. 81 to 85, interest 4 per cent. 
Water Loan Bond No. 293, interest 4 per cent. 
Water Loan Bond No. Reg. 102, interest 4 per cent. 
Water Loan Bonds Nos. 423 to 424, interest 4 per cent. . 
Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan Bond No. Reg. 160, 
interest ZVz per cent 

Total amount of bonds maturing in 1909 . . . $153,500 00 

Leaving the net funded debt December 31, 1909, as per 
Table B, $1,503,000, classified as follows :— 

City Loan Bonds at 3% per cent. 
City Loan Bonds at 4 per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bonds at dVz per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bonds at 4 per cent. . 
Sewer Loan Bonds at 4^ per cent. 
Paving Loan Bonds at 4 per cent. 
Water Loan Bonds at 4 per cent. 
Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan Bonds 

at SV2 per cent 

Lowell Street Bridge Loan Bonds, interest 

3V2 per cent 



Registered. 


Coupon. 


$103,000 00 


$261,000 00 


68,000 00 


621,000 00 


34,000 00 


62,000 00 


63,000 00 


158,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 




15,000 00 


25,000 00 


31,000 00 


3,000 00 


17,000 00 


5,000 00 


35,000 00 



$302,000 00 $1,201,000 00 



Registered Bonds $302,000 00 

Coupon Bonds 1,201,000 00 



$1,503,000 00 



Funded debt within the limit fixed by law : — 

City Loan $1,053,000 00 

Sewer Loan 271,000 00 

Lowell Street Bridge Loan .... 40,000 00 



$1,364,000 00 



Funded debt beyond the limit fixed by law: — 

Paving Loan (Chapter 153, Acts 1892) . $15,000 00 

Sewer Loan (Chapter 357, Acts 1895) . . 48,000 00 
Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan 

(Chapter 225, Acts 1902) . . . 20,000 00 



$83,000 00 
Water Loan 56,000 00 



139,000 00 

; i $1,503,000 00 

Resources 

The assessors' warrant for the tax levy, assessed upon the 
polls and estates of the inhabitants, was duly received. 

The total amount of taxable property was $63,658,953.20, 



24 



ANNUAL EEPOETS. 



and the rate of taxation was $18.60 on each $1,000 of valuation, 
as follows : — 

Real estate, valuation $57,295,600 00 

Personal estate, valuation 6,363,353 20 



At a rate of $18.60 on $1,000 valuation .... 

Polls, 21,191 at $2 

Street . sprinkling 

Suppression of gypsy and brown-tail moths 
Non-resident bank shares to be paid to state . 

Total amount of tax levy 

Borrowed on Funded Debt account, to provide for the 

cost of public improvements 

Water works income 

National bank taxes, applied to Police . . . 

Corporation taxes, applied to Police 

Court fees, fines, etc., applied to Police .... 
County of Middlesex, dog licenses, applied to Public 

Library 

Street Railway tax for the year 1909, applied to Highways 

Maintenance 

Boston Elevated Railway tax for the year 1909, applied 

to Highways Maintenance 



$63,658,953 20 

$1,184,056 53 

42,382 00 

30,677 25 

1,649 41 

1,379 13 

$1,260,144 32 

190,000 00 

223,094 29 

3,409 29 

31,775 39 

2,321 00 

3,796 11 

45,778 32 

9,236 99 

Total amount of resources $1,769,555 71 

Appropriations from Funded Debt and from Income. 

CREDIT BALANCES. 

Electrical Department, Underground Construction 
Fire Department, Additional Apparatus 

Highways, Construction 

Highways Construction, Lowell Street Bridges 

Highways, Maintenance 

Public Buildings Construction, Building Public Buildings, 
Public Buildings, Construction: — 

Addition to Contagious Disease Hospital 
Benjamin G. Brown School, Land Addition 
Sanford Hanscom School, Land Addition ..... 
Public Library: — 

Frances A. Wilder Children's Department Fund, 
Income .... 

Isaac Pitman Fund, Income, Art 

Isaac Pitman Fund, Income, Poetry 
Sewers, Construction 
Sidewalks, Construction 



$928 90 

5,059 55 

5,951 51 

31,567 13 

12,341 59 

415 49 


2,937 60 
1,500 00 
3,500 00 


4 40 
127 27 

34 26 

13,766 01 

66 69 



Cash. 



Balance on hand January 1, 1909 . 
Total cash receipts for the year 1909 



Total cash disbursements for the year 1909 
Balance in the treasury December 31, 1909 . 



$78,200 40 



$55,109 24 
2,557,538 79 

$2,612,648 03 
2,499,808 48 

$112,839 55 



KEPOKT OF TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



25 



Deposits in banks 
Cash on hand 



. $112,223 06 
616 49 



$112,839 55 



Assets and Liabilities. 

The assets of the city available for the payment of its un- 
funded liabilities are as follows : — 
Available assets : — 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Grade Crossings 

Highway Betterment Assessments, tincol 

lected 

Metered Water Charges 

Real Estate Liens 

Sewer Assessments, uncollected . 
Sidewalk Assessments, uncollected 

Taxes, uncollected 

Cash in treasury . . . • . 

Unfunded liabilities : — 



Coupons 

Overplus on Tax Sales 
Sundry Persons 
Temporary Loans . 



Excess of available assets 



$17,583 00 
9,376 54 

3,394 37 
15,664 46 

3,027 52 

9,752 78 

6,565 29 

283,342 51 

112,839 55 



$14,937 50 
118 13 
699 65 

350,000 00 



$461,546 02 



365,755 28 
$95,790 74 



Balance Sheet. 

DEBIT. 



Public Property 

Excess of available assets 



$5,360,829 14 

95,790 74 



-$5,456,619 88 



CREDIT. 

Excess of appropriations from tax levy 
Excess of appropriations from Funded 

Debt and from Income 
Excess of appropriations from tax levy, 

Overlay and Abatement 
Present Funded Debt 



$10,708 05 

78,200 40 

6,882 29 

1,503,000 00 

$1,598,790 74 
Property and Debt Balance or Municipal 

Capital ....... 3,857,829 14 



$5,456,619 88 



A detailed statement of the public property, funded debt, 
and the receipts and disbursements of the several accounts will 
be found in the following appendix. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph S. Pike, 
Treasurer and Collector of Taxes 



26 AXXUAL EEPOETS. 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



TABLE A.-PUBLIC PROPERTY DECEMBER 31, 1909. 

Central Hill land (389,920 feet) $270,000 00 

City Hall $35,332 32 

Furniture and fixtures .... 10,000 00 

Storage vault 2,342 91 

47,675 23 

Public Library building 42,000 00 

Public Library building, West Somerville . 25,449 52 

Public Library 25,000 00 

92,449 52 

City Hall Annex 20,'655 02 

Albion A. Perry Schoolhouse, Washington 

street, land (46,080 feet) and building . 36,000 00 

Furniture 1,080 00 

Books 530 00 

37,610 00 

Bingham Schoolhouse, land (35,586 feet) 

and building 67,405 04 

Furniture 2,600 00 

Books 2,300 00 

: 72,305 04 

Burns Schoolhouse, land (16,080 feet) and 

building . . - 33,300 00 

Furniture 1,460 00 

Books 1,000 00 

35,760 00 

Charles G. Pope Schoolhouse, land (27.236 

feet) and building 83,600 00 

Furniture 2,160 00 

Books 2,600 00 

88,360 00 

Cummings Schoolhouse, land (11,300 feet) 

and building 11,200 00 

Furniture 720 00 

Books 500 00 

12,420 00 

Davis Schoolhouse, land (30,155 feet) and 

building 22,000 00 

Furniture 720 00 

Books 400 00 

23,120 00 

Edgerly Schoolhouse, land (24,000 feet) and 

building 43,800 00 

Furniture 1,480 00 

Books 2 *nn no 

48,830 00 

Amount carried forward $749,184 81 



APPENDIX TO TREASURES AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 27 

Amount brought forward $749,184 81 

English High Schoolhouse .... 134,000 00 

Furniture . 3,900 00 

Philosophical and manual training ap- 
paratus 8,200 00 

Books 12,000 00 

158,100 00 

Forster Schoolhouse and Annex, land 

(30,632 feet) and buildings . . . 82,000 00 

Furniture 3,290 00 

Books 4,100 00 

89,390 00 

George L. Baxter Schoolhouse, land (11,000 

feet) and building 31,800 00 

Furniture 1,155 64 

Books 450 00 

33,405 64 

George O. Proctor Schoolhouse, building 

(on Armory lot) (40,244 feet). . . 41,029 16 

Furniture 1,791 30 

Books 1,200 00 

44,020 46 

George W. Durell Schoolhouse, land 

(13,883 feet) and building . . . 19,000 00 

Furniture 720 00 

Books 500 00 

20,220 00 

Highland Schoolhouse, land (23,260 feet) 

and building 58,000 00 

Furniture 2,560 00 

Books 2,800 00 

63,360 00 

Jacob T. Glines Schoolhouse, land (28,800 

feet) and building 78,200 00 

Furniture 2,340 00 

Books 2,100 00 

82,640 00 

Latin High Schoolhouse .... 111,822 76 

Furniture 2,700 00 

Philosophical apparatus .... 500 00 

Books . 3,300 00 

118,322 76 

Lincoln Schoolhouse, land (17,662 feet) and 

building 17,500 00 

Furniture 720 00 

Books 500 00 

18,720 00 

Luther V. Bell Schoolhouse, land (22,262 

feet) and building 46,496 63 

Furniture 2,400 00 

Books 2,400 00 

51,296 63 

Martin W. Carr Schoolhouse, land (20,450 

feet) and building 51,000 00 

Furniture 2,800 00 

Books 2.800 00 

56,600 00 

Amount carried forward $1,485,260 30 



28 



ANNUAL KEPOKTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Morse Schoolhouse, land (29,000 feet) and 

building 

Furniture 

Books 



Martha Perry Lowe Schoolhouse, 
(21,650 feet) and building 

Furniture 

Books 



land 



O 



. S. Knapp Schoolhouse, land 

feet) and building 
Furniture 

Books . . 



(24,517 



Prescott Schoolhouse, land (22,000 feet) 

and building 

Furniture 

Books 

Prospect-hill Schoolhouse, land (23,733 

feet) and building 

Benjamin G. Brown Schoolhouse, 
(20,093 feet) and building 

Furniture 

Books 



land 



Sanford Hanscom Schoolhouse, land (12,756 

feet) and building 

Furniture . 

Books 

Clark W. Bennett Schoolhouse, land (16,250 

feet) and building 

Furniture ....... 

Books 

William H. Hodgkins Schoolhouse, land 
(35,034 feet) and building- 
Furniture 

Books . • 

City Stables, dwelling houses and 462,623 
feet of land . . . 
Health Department, shed . 

Incinerator 

Equipments for highway repairs 
Watering carts and sheds . 



45,859 00 
2,340 00 

2,800 00 



50,346 16 

1,480 00 
800 00 



48,000 00 
2,540 00 
3,000 00 



64,000 00 
2,260 00 
2,700 00 



60,077 42 

1,290 16 

700 00 



69,249 48 

1,080 00 

500 00 



57,268 32 
2,180 00 
1,000 00 



69,300 00 
2,400 00 
2,300 00 



95,350 12 
1,189 79 

2,704 01 

21,690 00 

5,000 00 



Water Works, land and buildings (93,500 feet) . 

No. 1 Fire Station, land (8,937 feet) and 

building 33,200 00 

Engine No. 2 and apparatus . . . 4,000 00 

Hose wagon No. 1 and apparatus . . 1,500 00 

Furniture 400 00 



$1,485,260 30 
50,999 00 

52,626 16 

53,540 00 

68,960 00 
15,000 00 

62,067 58 
70,829 48 
60,448 32 
74,000 00 



125,933 92 

32,000 00 



39,100 00 



Amount carried forward $2,190,764 76 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTORS REPORT. 



29 



Amount brought forward 

No. 2 Fire Station, land (5,500 feet) and 

building 10,400 00 

Furniture 400 00 

Hose wagon No 2 and apparatus . . 1,500 00 

No. 3 Fire Station, land (13,700 feet) and 

building 55,743 18 

Furniture 400 00 

Hose wagon No. 3 and apparatus . . 1,500 00 

Hook and ladder truck and apparatus . 3,400 00 

Engine No. 3 . 5,375 00 

Combination hose and chemical . . 2,250 00 

No. 4 Fire Station, land (9,100 feet) and 

building 15,500 00 

Furniture 400 00 

Engine No. 4 and apparatus . . . 4,000 00 

Combination wagon and apparatus . . 2,500 00 

No. 5 Fire Station, land (39,000 feet) and 

building 16,500 00 

Furniture ........ 400 00 

Hose wagon No. 5 and apparatus . . 1,500 00 

No. 6 Fire Station, land (8,113 feet) and 

building 17,600 00 

Furniture 600 00 

Apparatus . . . . # . . . 10,265 45 

Combination hose and chemical . . 2,250 00 

Hook and Ladder Station No. 2, land 

(9,903 feet) and building .... 14,100 00 

Furniture 1,200 00 

Apparatus 7,500 00 

Central Fire Station, land (11,738 feet) and 

building 36,700 00 

Furniture 500 00 

Engine No. 1 and apparatus . . . 4,000 00 

Hose wagon and apparatus . . . 2,000 00 

Two relief hose carriages .... 1,000 00 

One relief hook and ladder . . . 400 00 

Chemical Engine A and equipment . . 2,498 53 

Fire Alarm and Police Signal apparatus .... 
Police Station, land (15,225 feet) and 

building 54,000 00 

Furniture . . ... . . . 3,000 00 

City Home, Broadway, land (421,646 feet) 

and buildings 36,807 64 

Furniture ....... 1,426 09 

Contagious Disease Hospital . . . 11,256 16 

Land (88,364 feet) 15,600 00 



Bath House 

Water Works 

Sewers 

Prospect street, land (7,918 feet) and building 



$2,190,764 76 



12,300 00 



68,668 18 



22,400 00 



18,400 00 



30,715 45 



22,800 00 



47,098 53 
36,610 00 



57,000 00 



38,233 73 



26,856 16 

3,730 24 

916,852 48 

1,233,725 19 

6,800 00 



Amount carried forward $4,732,954 72 



30 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward 

Broadway Park (cost $212,993.20) (700,000 square feet) . 
Nathan Tufts Park (about 4 54-100 acres, 217,572 feet) . 
Lincoln Park, Washington street (288,764 

square feet) 63,200 00 

Out-door Gymnasium 800 00 



Prospect-hill Park (94,503 feet) . 
Historical Building and Observatory 



67,511 75 
9,119 55 



$4,732,954 72 

270,000 00 

68,000 00 



64,000 00 



Franklin Park (40,000 feet) 

Powder-House Boulevard (200,618 square feet) and 

building 

Joy street, land (2,700 feet) 

Broadway, land (10,890 feet) 

College avenue, land (18,000 feet) 
Webster avenue, land (10,000 feet) 
Holland street, land (217,800 feet) 
Gravel land in Waltham (about 35 acres) . 
Gravel land rear North street (199,043 feet) 

Clarendon Hill ledge 

Oliver street, land (40,500 feet) .... 
Beacon street, land (10,000 feet) .... 
Passageway on Putnam street (1,135 feet) . 

Stand Pipe lot (17,176 feet) 

Glen street, land (6,370 feet) 

Somerville avenue, land (305 feet) 

Broadway, junction Main street, land (1,260 feet) 

Joy-street playground (20,000 feet) 

Total amount of public property . . * . 



76,631 30 


12,000 00 


22,500 00 


500 00 


2,300 00 


6,000 00 


2,500 00 


35,500 00 


14,393 12 


5,500 00 


8,500 00 


18,000 00 


2,800 00 


400 00 


5,100 00 


2,300 00 


300 00 


900 00 


9,750 00 


$5,360,829 14 



APPENDIX TO TREASURES AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 31 

TABLE B.— FUNDED DEBT DECEMBER 31, 1909. 
City Loan Bonds. 



DATE. 



Number of Bonds. 



Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 



April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1894 
July 1, 1895 
July 1, 1896 
July 1, 1896 
July 1, 1897 
July 1, 1898 
July 1, 1899 
July 2, 1900 

July 2, 1900 

July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
Julv 1, 1904 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1906 
Oct. 1, 1903 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 



Reg. 115 
3,530 to 3,540 
3,653 to 3,659 
3,726 to 3,736 
1,704 to 1,709 
1,977 to 1,990 
2,172 to 2,176 

Reg. 172 
2,331 to 2,335 
2,471 to 2,475 
2,592 to 2,595 

Reg. 180 

2,726 to 2,731 
2,734 to 2,735 

2,840 to 2,846 
Reg. 179 
Reg. 164 

3,074 to 3,082 

3,235 to 3,239 
3,240 

3,241 to 3,242 
3,243 
Reg. 7 

3,162 to 3,163 
Reg. 116 
Reg. 17 

Amounts 



3y 2 

4 

4 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
V/z 

3Yz 

3V 2 

3% 

3V 2 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

SVz 

4 

carried 



When due. 



Apr. 1, 1910 
Apr. 1, 1910 
Apr. 1, 1910 
Apr. 1, 1910 
July 1, 1910 



July 1 
Julyl 
July 1 
July 1 
July 1 
July 1 
July 1 

July 1 

July 1 
July 1 
July 1 
Julyl 
Julyl 
July 1 
Julyl 
Julyl 
Julyl 
Oct. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 



1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 

1910 

1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1911 
1911 



Denomi- 
nation. 



forward. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,000 



1,000 

1,000 
500 

1,000 
500 

1,000 



Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 



$11,000 
7,000 

11,000 
6,000 

14,000 
5,000 

5,000 
5,000 
4,000 

8,000 
7,000 



9,000 
5,000 

500 
2,000 

500 

2,000 



$102,000 



Amount 

Reg. 
Bonds. 



$9,000 



3,000 



2,000 



8,000 
1,000 



8,000 

9,000 
6,000 



$46,000 



32 



AKtfTJAL REPORTS. 



CITY LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 


Amount 

Reg. 

Bonds. 




Amounts 


brought 


forward. . 




$102,000 


$46,000 


April 1, 1907 


3,547 to 3,551 


4 


Apr. 1, 1911 


$1,000 


5,000 




April 1, 1908 


3,660 to 3,666 


4 


Apr. 1, 1911 


1,000 


7,000 




April 1, 1909 


3,737 to 3,747 


&k 


Apr. 1, 1911 


1,000 


11,000 




July 1, 1894 


1,710 to 1,715 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


6,000 




July 1, 1895 


1,991 to 2,004 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


14,000 




July 1, 1896 


2,180 to 2,187 


4 


July 1, 1911- 


1,000 


8,000 




July 1, 1897 


2,336 to 2,340 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


5,000 


• • • • • • 


July 1, 1898 


2,476 to 2,480 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


5,000 




July 1, 1899 


2,596 to 2,599 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


4,000 




July 2, 1900 


2,736 to 2,740 


3Y 2 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


5,000 




July 1, 1901 


2,847 to 2,853 


3Ya 


July 1,1911 


1,000 


7,000 




July 1, 1902 


2,974 to 2,975 


3y 2 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


2,000 




July 1, 1902 


Reg. 165 


3y 2 


July 1, 1911 







7,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,083 to 3,091 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


9,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,244 to 3,248 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


5,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,249 


4 


July 1, 1911 


500 


500 




July 1, 1904 


3,250 to 3,251 


4 


July 1,1911 


1,000 


2,000 




Julv 1, 1904 


3,252 


4 


July 1, 1911 


500 


500 




July 1, 1906 


3,460 to 3,464 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


5,000 




July 1, 1906 


Reg. 13 


4 


July 1, 1911 






3,000 


Oct. 1, 1903 


3,164 to 3,165 


4 


Oct. 1, 1911 


1,000 


2,000 




April 1, 1905 


Reg. 117 


3V2 


Apr. 1, 1912 






9,000 


April 1, 1907 


Reg. 15 


4 


Apr. 1, 1912 






2,000 


April 1, 1907 


3,554 to 3,555 


4 


Apr. 1, 1912 


1,000 


2,000 




April 1, 1907 


Reg. 182 


4 


Apr. 1, 1912 






2,000 


April 1, 1907 


3,558 to 3,562 


4 


Apr. 1, 1912 


1,000 


5,000 




April 1, 1908 


3,667 to 3,673 


4 


Apr. 1, 1912 


1,000 


7,000 




April 1, 1909 


3,748 to 3,758 
Amounts 


3y 2 

carried 


Apr. 1, 1912 
forward. . 


1,000 

• • • • 


11,000 
$230,000 






$69,000 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



33 



CITY LOAN BONDS. — Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rat e per 
cent, of 
Interest 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount 

Coupon 

Bonds. 


Amount 

Reg 
Bonds. 




Amounts 


brought 


forward. . 


■ . . • • 


$230,000 


$69,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,716 to 1,721 


4 


July 1, 1912 


$1,000 


6,000 




July 1, 1895 


2,005 to 2,018 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


14,000 




July 1, 1896 


2,188 to 2,194 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


7,000 




July 1, 1897 


2,341 to 2,344 


4 


July 1,1912 


1,000 


4,000 




July 1, 1898 


2,481 to 2,485 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


5,000 




July 1, 1899 


2,600 to 2,603 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


4,000 





July 2, 1900 


2,741 to 2,745 


3^ 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


5,000 





July 1, 1901 


2,854 to 2,857 


3y 2 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


4,000 




July 1, 1902 | 


2,979 to 2,980 
2,983 to 2,937 


j 3y 3 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


7,000 




July 1, 1902 


Reg. 166 


3% 


July 1, 1912 






2,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,092 to 3,100 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


9,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,253 to 3,257 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


5,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,258 


4 


July 1, 1912 


500 


500 





July 1, 1904 


3,259 to 3,260 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


2,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,261 


4 


Julv 1, 1912 


500 


500 




July 1, 1906 


Reg. 8 


4 


July 1, 1912 






7,000 


Oct. 1, 1903 


3,166 to 3,167 


4 


Oct. 1, 1912 


1,000 


2,000 




April 1, 1905 


Reg. 118 


3y 2 


Apr. 1, 1913 






9,000 


April 1, 1907 


Reg. 48 


4 


Apr. 1, 1913 






1,000 


April 1, 1907 


3,564 to 3,573 


4 , 


Apr. 1, 1913 


1,000 


10,000 




April 1, 1908 


3,674 to 3,680 


4 


Apr. 1, 1913 


1,000 


7,000 




April 1, 1909 


3,759 to 3,769 


3V 2 


Apr. 1, 1913 


1,000 


11,000 




July 1, 1894 


1,722 to 1,727 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


6,000 




July 1, 1895 


2,019 to 2,031 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


13,000 




July 1, 1896 


2,195 to 2,201 


4 


July 1,1913 


1,000 


7,000 




July 1, 1897 


2,345 to 2,348 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


4,000 




July 1, 1898 


2,486 to 2,490 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


5,000 




July 1, 1899 


2,604 to 2,607 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


4,000 




July 2, 1900 


2,746 to 2,749 


3% 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


4,000 






Amounts 


carried 


forward. . 




$376,000 


$38,000 



34 



ANNUAL EEPOBTS. 



CITY LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 



July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1902 
July -1, 1903 
July 1. 1904 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1906 
Oct. 1, 1903 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1. IPC'S 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1894 
July 1, 1894 
July 1, 1895 
July 1, 1S96 
1, 1896 
July 1. 1897 
July 1, 1898 
July 1, 1899 
July 2, 1900 
July 1, 1901 
July 1. 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1,. 1004 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1904 
July 1.. 1904 
July 1, 1906 
Oct. 1, 1903 



Number of Bonds. 



Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 



Amounts 

•2,558 to 2,861 

to 2,990 

3,101 to 3,109 

3.262 to 3.260 

3,267 

3.268 to 3,269 

3,270 

Reg. 9 

3.16S to 3,169 

Reg. 119 
3.574 to 3.5S4 
3,681 to 3,687 
3.770 to 3,780 
1,728 to 1,732 

Reg. 178 
2,032 to 2,044 
2,202 to 2.206 

Reg. 173 
2,349 to 2.352 
2,491 to 2.495 
to 2,611 
2.750 to 2,753 
2,862 to 2,865 
2.991 to 2,993 
3.11" to 3.113 
3,271 to 3,275 

3,276 

3,277 to 3,278 

3.279 

Reg. 10 

3.170 to 3.171 

Amounts 



brought 

3y 2 
3y 2 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

3y 2 

4 
4 

3y 2 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

Vh 

3% 

SVo 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

carried 



When due. 



Denomi- 
nation. 



Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 



Amount 

Reg- 

Bonds. 



fonvard. . 
July 1,1913 
July 1. 1913 
July 1, 1913 
July 1, 1913 
July 1, 1913 
July 1, 1913 
July 1, 1913 
July 1. 1913 
Oct. 1, 1913 
Apr. 1, 1914 
Apr. 1, 1914 
Apr. 1, 1914 
Apr. 1. 1914 
July 1, 1914 
July 1, 1914 
July 1, 1914 
July 1, 1914 
July 1. 1914 
July 1, 1914 . 
July 1. 1914 
July 1, 1914 
July 1, 1914 
July 1, 1914 
July 1, 1914 
July 1, 1914 
July 1.1914 
July 1, 1914 
July 1, 1914 
July 1,1914 
July 1, 1914 
Oct. 1, 1914 

forward. . 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

500 
1,000 

500 

1,000 

1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

1,000 

1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

500 
1,000 

500 



1,000 



$376,000 
4,000 
3,000 
9,000 
5.000 

500 
2,000 

500 



2,000 

11,000 
7,000 

11,000 
5,000 

13,000 
5,000 

4,000 
5,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
3,000 
4,000 
5,000 

500 
2,000 

500 



2,000 



$492,000 i $113,000 



ATTENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 
CITY LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



35 



DATE. 



April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1895 
July 1, 1896 
July 1, 1897 
July 1, 1893 
July 1, 1899 
July 2, 1900 
July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1906 
Oct. 1, 1903 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1896 
July 1, 1897 
July 1, 1898 
July 1, 1899 
July 2, 1900 
July 2, 1900 
July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1902 



Number of Bonds. 



Amounts 

Reg. 120 
3,585 to 3,589 

Reg. 183 
3,591 to 3,595 
3,688 to 3,694 
3,781 to 3,791 
2,045 to 2,057 
2,209 to 2,215 
2,353 to 2,356 
2,496 to 2,500 
2,612 to 2,614 
2,754 to 2,757 
2,866 to 2,869 
2,994 to 2,996 

Reg. 175 

3,280 to 3,281 

3,232 

Reg. 11 
3,172 to 3,173 

Reg. 121 
3,596 to 3,606 
3,695 to 3,701 
3,792 to 3,802 
2,216 to 2,222 
2,357 to 2,360 
2,501 to 2,505 
2,615 to 2,617 
2,758 to 2,760 

Reg. 184 
2,870 to 2,873 
2,997 to 2,999 

Amounts 



Rate per 
Cent, of 
Interest. 



brought 

3% 

4 

4 

4 

4 

3?/ 2 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

3y 2 

3V 2 

3% 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

3% 

4 

4 

3% 

4 

4 

4 

4 

3V 2 

3Mi 

3y 2 

3% 

carried 



When due. 



forward. . 
Apr. 1, 1915 
Apr. 1, 1915 
Apr. 1, 1915 
Apr. 1, 1915 
Apr. 1, 1915 
Apr. 1, 1915 
July 1, 1915 
July 1, 1915 
July 1, 1915 
July 1, 1915 
July 1,1915 
July 1,1915 
July 1, 1915 
July 1, 1915 
July 1, 1915 
July 1, 1915 
July 1, 1915 
July 1,1915 
Oct. 1, 1915 
Apr. 1, 1916 
Apr. 1, 1916 
Apr. 1, 1916 
Apr. 1, 1916 
July 1,1916 
July 1, 1916 
July 1,1916 
July 1, 1916 
July 1, 1916 
July 1, 1916 
July 1, 1916 
July 1,1916 

forward. . 



Denomi- 
nation. 



$1,000 

• • • • • • 

1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
500 



1,000 



Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 



$492,000 
5,000 



5,000 
7,000 
11,000 
13,000 
7,000 
4,000 
5,000 
3,000 
4,000 
4,000 
3,000 

2,000 
500 

2,000 



1,000 


11,000 


1,000 


7,000 


1,000 


11,000 


1,000 


7,000 


1,000 


4,000 


1,000 


5,000 


1,000 


3,000 


1,000 


3,000 


1,000 


4,000 


1,000 


3,000 



$625,500 



$113,000 
8,000 



$137,000 



36 



ANNUAL IiEPOETS. 
CITY LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 


1 

Number of Bonds. , 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 


Amount 

Reg. 

Bonds. 




Amounts 


brought 


forward. . 




$625,500 


$137,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,118 to 3,121 


4 


July 1, 1916 


$1,000 


4,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,283 to 3,284 


4 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


2,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,285 


4 


July 1, 1916 


500 


500 




July 1, 1906 


Reg. 12 


4 


July 1, 1916 






7,000 


Oct. 1, 1903 


3,174 to 3,175 


4 


Oct. 1, 1916 


1,000 


2,000 




April 1, 1905 


Reg. 122 


3Y 2 


Apr. 1, 1917 






3,000 


April 1, 1907 


3,607 to 3,617 


4 


Apr. 1, 1917 


1,000 


11,000 




April 1, 1908 


3,702 to 3,708 


4 


Apr. 1, 1917 


1,000 


7,000 




April 1, 1909 


3,803 to 3,813 


3^ 


Aor. 1, 1917 


1,000 


11,000 




July 1, 1897 


2,361 to 2,364 


4 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


4,000 




July 1, 1898 


2,506 to 2,510 


4 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


5,000 




July 1, 1899 


2,618 to 2,620 


4 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


3,000 




July 2, 1900 


2,762 to 2,765 


3^ 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


4,000 




July 1, 1901 


2,874 to 2,877 


3V 2 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


4,000 


• • • • • • 


July 1, 1902 


3,000 to 3,002 


3Ya 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


3,000 




July 1, 1903 


3,122 to 3,125 


4 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


4,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,236 to 3,287 


4 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


2,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,288 


4 


July 1, 1917 


500 


500 




July 1, 1906 


3,503 


4 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


1,000 




Oct. 1, 1903 


3,176 to 3,177 


4 


Oct. 1, 1917 


1,000 


2,000 




April 1, 1905 


Reg. 123 


3% 


Apr. 1, 1918 






3,000 


April 1, 1907 


3,618 to 3,620 


4 


Apr. 1, 1918 


1,000 


3,000 




April 1, 1908 


3,709 to 3,715 


4 


Apr. 1, 1918 


1,000 


7,000 


• • • • • • 


April 1, 1909 


3,814 to 3,824 


3% 


Apr. 1, 1918 


1,000 


11,000 




July 1, 1898 


2,511 to 2,515 


4 


July 1,1918 


1,000 


5,000 




July 1, 1899 


2,621 to 2,623 


4 


July 1, 1918 


1,000 


3,000 




July 2, 1900 


2,766 to 2,769 


3y 2 


July 1, 1918 


1,000 


4,000 




July 1, 1901 


2,878 to 2,881 


3Va 


July 1, 1918 


1,000 


4,000 




July 1, 1902 


3,003 to 3,005 


3^2 


July 1, 1918 


1,000 


3,000 




July 1, 1903 


3,126 to 3,129 


4 


July 1, 1918 


1,000 


4,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,289 to 3,290 
Amounts 


4 
carried 


July 1, 1918 
forward. . 


1,000 


2,000 






$741,500 


$150,000 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEEE AND COLLECTOR'S EEPOET. 37 

CITY LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 



July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1906 
Oct. 1, 1903 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1899 
July 2, 1900 
July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1906 
Oct. 1, 1903 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
July 2, 1900 
July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1906 
Oct. 1, 1903 
April 1, 1905 



Number of Bonds. 



Amounts 

3,291 

3,504 
3,178 to 3,179 

Reg. 124 
3,621 to 3,623 

3,716 
3,825 to 3,835 
2,624 to 2,625 
2,770 to 2,773 
2,882 to 2,885 
3,006 to 3,008 
3,130 to 3,133 
3,292 to 3,293 

3,294 

3,505 
3,180 to 3,181 

Reg. 125 
3,624 to 3,626 

3,717 

3,836 
2,774 to 2,777 
2,886 to 2,889 
3,009 to 3,011 
3,134 to 3,137 
3,295 to 3,296 

3,297 

3,506 

3,182 to 3,183 

Reg. 126 

Amounts 



Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 



brought 
4 
4 
4 

3V 2 
4 
4 

3y 2 

4 

3y 2 
3y 2 
3y 2 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

3y 2 

4 
4 

3y 2 
3% 

3% 

3y 2 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

3y 2 

carried 



When due. 



forward. . 
July 1, 1918 



Julyl 
Oct. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Julyl 
Julyl 
Julyl 
July 1 
Julyl 
Julyl 
Julyl 
Julyl 
Oct. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
July 1 
Julyl 
Julyl 
Julyl 
Julyl 
Julyl 
Julyl 
Oct. 1 
Apr. 1 



1918 
1918 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1921 



forward. 



Denomi- 
nation. 



$500 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
1,000 
1,000 



Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 



$741,500 

500 

1,000 

2,000 



3,000 
1,000 
11,000 
2,000 
4,000 
4,000 
3,000 
4,000 
2,000 
500 
1,000 
2,000 

3,000 
1,000 
1,000 
4,000 
4,000 
3,000 
4,000 
2,000 
500 
1,000 
2,000 

$808,000 



Amount 

Reg. 
Bonds. 



$150,000 



3,000 



3,000 



3,000 
$159,000 



38 



ANNUAL RErOBTS. 
CITY LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 

1 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 


Amount 

Reg. 
Bonds. 




Amounts 


brought 


forward. . 




$808,000 


$159,000 


April 1, 1907 


3,627 to 3,629 


4 


Apr. 1, 1921 


$1,000 


3,000 




April 1, 1908 


3,718 


4 


Apr. 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


3,837 


3V 2 


Apr. 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1901 


2,890 to 2,-93 


3% 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


4,000 




July 1, 1902 


3,012 to 3,014 


3y 2 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


3,000 




July 1, 1903 


3,138 to 3,141 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


4,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,293 to 3,299 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


2,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,300 


4 


July 1. 1921 


500 


500 




July 1, 1906 


3,507 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 




Oct. 1, 1903 


3,184 to 3,185 


4 


Oct. 1, 1921 


1,000 


2,000 




April 1, 1905 


Reg. 127 


3y 2 


Apr. 1, 1922 






3,000 


April 1, 1907 


3,630 to 3,632 


4 


Apr. 1, 1922 


1,000 


3,000 




Aoril 1, 1903 


3,719 


4 


Apr. 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


3,833 


3y 2 


Apr. 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1902 


3,015 to 3,016 


3y 2 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


2,000 




July 1, 1903 


3,142 to 3,145 


4 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


4,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,301 to 3,302 


4 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


2,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,303 


4 


July 1, 1922 


500 


500 




Oct. 1, 1903 


3,186 to 3,187 


4 


Oct. 1, 1922 


1,000 


2,000 




April 1, 1905 


Reg. 123 


3% 


Apr. 1, 1923 






3,000 


April 1, 1907 


3,633 to 3,635 


4 


Apr. 1, 1923 


1,000 


3,000 




April 1, 1908 


3,720 


4 


Apr. 1, 1923 


1,000 


1.000 




April 1, 1909 


3,839 


3% 


Apr. 1, 1923 


1,000 


1.000 




July 1, 1903 


3.146 to 3,149 


4 


July 1. 1923 


1,000 


4,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,304 to 3,305 


4 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


2,000 




July 1, 1904 


3,306 


4 


July 1, 1923 


500 


500 




Oct. 1, 1903 


3,188 to 3,189 


4 


Oct. 1. 1923 


1,000 


2.000 




April 1, 1905 


Reg. 129 


3M> 


Apr. 1, 1924 






■ 3,000 


April 1, 1907 


3,636 to 3,638 
Amounts 


4 
carried 


Apr. 1, 1924 
forward. . 


1,000 


3,000 






$361,500 


$168,000 



APTENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



3D 



CITY LOAN BONDS.— Concluded. 



DATE. 



April 1, 190S 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1904 



Number of Bonds. 



April 1 


1905 


April 1 


1907 


April 1 


1908 


April 1 


1909 


April 1 


. 1907 


April 1 


1908 


Aoril 1 


1909 


April 1 


1907 


April 1 


1903 


April 1 


1909 


April 1 


1908 


April 1 


1909 


April 1 


1909 



Amounts 

3,721 

3,840 
3,307 to 3,308 

3,309 

Reg. 130 

3,039 to 3,641 

3,722 

3,841 
3,642 to 3,643 

3,723 

3,842 
3,644 to 3,645 

3,724 

3,843 

3,725 

3,844 

3,845 



Rate per. 
cent, of 
Interest. 



brought 
4 

4 

4 

3% 

4 

4 

3V 2 
4 
4 

3y 2 

4 

4 

3V 2 

4 

3% 

3% 



When due. 



Denomi- 
nation. 



forward. . 
Apr. 1, 1924 
Apr. 1, 1924 
July 1, 1924 
July 1, 1924 
Apr. 1, 1925 
Apr. 1, 1925 
Apr. 1, 1925 
Apr. 1, 1925 
Apr. 1, 1926 
Apr. 1, 1926 
Apr. 1, 1926 
Apr. 1, 1927 
Apr. 1, 1927 
Apr. 1, 1927 
Apr. 1, 1928 
Apr. 1, 1928 
Apr. 1, 1929 



$1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 



$361,500 

1,000 

1,000 

2,000 

500 



3,000 
1,000 
1,000 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



$882,000 



Amount 
Reg. 

Bonds. 



$163,000 



3,000 



$171,000 



Coupon Bonds . . $882,000 
Registered Bonds . 171,000 



Total amount of City Loan Bonds 



$1,053,000 



40 



\ ANNUAL HEPORTS. 

Sewer Loan Bonds. 



DATE. 



April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1894 
July 1, 1897 
July 1, 1898 
July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1906 
Oct. 1, 1893 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1S94 
July 1, 1897 
July 1, 1898 
July 1. 1901 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1906 
Oct. 1, 1893 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 



Number of Bonds. 



Reg. 133 
Reg. 20 

440 

469 
69 

186 

210 

232 
Reg. 168 

285 

309 
Reg. 1 
Reg. 159 
Reg. 134 
Reg. 21 

441 

470 
70 

187 

211 

233 
Reg. 169 

286 

310 

363 
53 
Reg. 135 
Reg. 22 

442 
471 
Amounts 



Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 



• 3y 2 

4 
4 

3y 2 

4 
4 
4 
3V 2 

3y 2 

4 
4 
4 

4y 2 

3% 

4 
4 
3% 

4 
4 
4 
3% 

3y 2 

4 
4 
4 

3y 2 

4 
4 
3% 

carried 



When due. 



Apr. 1 

Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Julyl 
July 1 
Julyl 
Julyl 
July 1 
July 1 
July 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Julyl 
Julyl 
Julyl 
Julyl 
Julyl 
July 1 
Julyl 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 

forwa 



,1910 

,1910 

,1910 

,1910 

,1910 

,1910 

,1910 

, 191D 

,1910 

, 1910 

,1910 

,1910 

,1910 

, 1911 

,1911 

,1911 

,1911 

,1911 

,1911 

,1911 

,1911 

, 1911 

,1911 

,1911 

,1911 

, 1911 

L, 1912 

., 1912 

., 1912 

1, 1912 

rd.. 



Denomi- 
nation. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 



Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,000 



1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 



1,000 
1,000 



$20,000 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTORS EEPORT. 41 

SEWER LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount 

Coupon 

Bonds. 


Amount 

Reg. 

Bonds. 




Amounts 


brought 


forward. . 




$20,000 


$13,000 


July 1, 1894 


188 


4 


July 1, 1912 


$1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1897 


71 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1898 


212 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1901 


234 


3% 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1902 


Reg. 170 


sy 2 


July 1, 1912 






1,000 


July 1, 1903 


287 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1904 


311 


4 


July 1,1912 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1906 


Reg. 2 


4 


July 1, 1912 






1,000 


April 1, 1905 


Reg. 130 


BYz 


Apr. 1, 1913 






1,000 


April 1, 1907 


Reg. 23 


4 


Apr. 1, 1913 


• • • • • • 




2,000 


April 1, 1908 


443 


4 


Apr. 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


472 


3V 2 


Apr. 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1894 


72 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1897 


189 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1898 


213 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1901 


235 


3V 2 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1902 


264 


3V 2 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1903 


288 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1904 


312 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1906 


Reg. 3 


4 


July 1, 1913 






1,000 


April 1, 1905 


Reg. 137 


3V 2 


Apr. 1, 1914 






1,000 


April 1, 1907 


Reg. 24 


4 


Apr. 1, 1914 






2,000 


April 1, 1908 


444 


4 


Apr. 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


473 


3y a 


Apr. 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1894 


73 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1897 


190 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1898 


214 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1901 


236 


3Va 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1902 


265 


3V 2 


July 1,1914 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1903 


289 
Amounts 


4 
carried 


July 1, 1914 
forward. . 


1,000 


1,000 






$43,000 


$22,000 



42 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 
SEWER LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 


Amount 

Reg. 

Bonds- 




Amounts 


brought 


forward. . 




$43,000 


$22,000 


July 1, 1904 


313 


4 


July 1, 1914 


$1,000 


1,000 




July -1, 1906 


Reg. 4 


4 


July 1. 1914 






1,000 


April 1, 1905 


Reg. 138 


3% 


Apr. 1, 1915 






1,000 


April 1, 1907 


Reg. 25 


4 


Apr. 1, 1915 






2,000 


April 1, 1908 


445 


4 


Apr. 1, 1915 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


474 


3% 


Apr. 1, 1915 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1897 


191 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1898 


215 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1901 


237 


3V 2 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1902 


266 


3y 2 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1903 


Reg. 174 


4 


July 1, 1915 






1,000 


July 1, 1904 


314 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1906 


Reg. 5 


4 


July 1, 1915 






1,000 


April 1, 1905 


Reg. 139 


3y 2 


Apr. 1, 1916 






1,000 


April 1, 1907 


Reg. 26 


4 


Apr. 1, 1916 






2,000 


April 1, 1908 


446 


4 


Apr. 1, 1916 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


475 


m 


Apr. 1, 1916 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1897 


192 


4 


July 1,1916 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1898 


216 


4 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1901 


238 


3V 2 


July l; 1916 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1902 


267 


3V 2 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1903 


291 


4 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1904 


315 


4 


July 1,1916 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1906 


Reg. 6 


4 


July 1, 1916 






1,000 


April 1, 1905 


Reg. 140 


3V 2 


Apr. 1, 1917 






1,000 


April 1, 1907 


Reg. 27 


4 


Apr. 1, 1917 






2,000 


April 1, 1908 


447 


4 


Apr. 1, 1917 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


476 


3% 


Apr. 1, 1917 


1,000 


1,000" 




July 1, 1897 


193 
Amounts 


4 
carriec 


July 1,1917 
forward. . 


1,000 


1,000 






$62,000 


$35,000 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 43 

SEWER LOAN BONDS.-Continued. 



DATE. 



July 1, 1898 
July 1, 1001 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1906 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1897 
July 1, 1898 
July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1906 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1897 
July 1, 1898 
July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1906 
April 1, 1905 



Number of Bonds. 



Amounts 

217 

239 

268 

292 

316 

369 
Reg. 141 
Reg. 28 

448 
• 477 

194 

218 

240 

269 

293 

317 

370 
Reg. 142 
Reg. 29 

449 

478 

195 

219 

241 

270 

294 

318 

371 
Reg. 143 

Amounts 



Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 



brought 
4 

3V 2 
3V 2 
4 
4 
4 

3y 2 

4 

4 

3V 2 

4 

4 

a% 

sy 2 

4 
4 
4 

3% 

4 
4 

3% 
4 
4 
3% 

3Vs 
4 
4 
4 

3% 
carried 



When due. 



forward. 



July 

July 

July 

July 

July 

July 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

July 

July 

July 

July 

July 

July 

July 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

July 

July 

July 

July 

July 

July 

July 

Apr. 



1917 

1917 

1917 

1917 

1917 

1917 

, 1918 

,1918 

, 1918 

,1918 

1918 

1918 

1918 

1918 

1918 

1918 

1918 

,1919 

, 1919 

,1919 

,1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

,1920 



forward. 



Denomi- 
nation. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 



Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 



$62,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

$36,000 



Amount 

Reg. 
Bonds. 



44 



ANNUAL EEPOETS. 
SEWER LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 


Amount 

Reg. 

Bonds. 




Amounts 


brought 


forward. . 




$86,000 


$42,000 


April 1, 1907 


Reg. 30 


4 


Apr. 1, 1920 






2,000 


April 1, 1908 


450 


4 


Apr- 1, 1920 


$1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


479 


3y 2 


Apr. 1, 1920 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1. 1897 


196 


4 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1,1898 


220 


4 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1901 


242 


3M* 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1902 


271 


ZVz 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1903 


295 


4 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1904 


319 


4 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1906 


372 


4 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1905 


Reg. 144 


3% 


Apr. 1, 1921 






1,000 


April 1, 1907 


Reg. 31 


4 


Apr. 1, 1921 






2,000 


April 1, 1908 


451 


4 


Apr. 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


480 


3y 2 


Apr. 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1897 


197 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1898 


221 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1901 


243 


3y 2 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1902 


272 


3V 2 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1903 


296 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1904 


320 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1. 1906 


373 


4 


July 1,1921 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1905 


Reg. 145 


3% 


Apr. 1,1922 







1,000 


April 1, 1907 


Reg. 32 


4 


Apr. 1, 1922 






2,000 


April 1, 1908 


452 


4 


Apr. 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


481 


3y 2 


Apr. 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1897 


198 


4 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1898 


222 


4 


July 1,1922 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1901 


244 


3y 2 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1902 


273 

Amounts 


3y 2 

carriec 


July 1, 1922 
1 forward. . 


1,000 


1,000 






$110,000 


$50,000 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 45 

SEWER LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 


Amount 

Reg. 

Bonds. 




Amounts 


brought 


forward. . 




$110,000 


$50,000 


July 1, 1903 


297 


4 


July 1, 1922 


$1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1904 


321 


4 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1906 


374 


4 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1905 


Reg. 146 


3V 2 


Apr. 1, 1923 






1,000 


April 1, 1907 


Reg. 33 


4 


Apr. 1, 1923 






2,000 


April 1, ]908 


453 


4 


Apr. 1, 1923 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


482 


3V 2 


Apr. 1, 1923 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1898 


223 


4 


July 1,1923 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1901 


245 


3y 2 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1902 


274 


3y 2 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1903 


298 


4 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1904 


322 


4 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1906 


375 


4 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1905 


Reg. 147 


3V 2 


Apr. 1, 1924 






1,000 


April 1, 1907 


Reg. 34 


4 


Apr. 1, 1924 






2,000 


April 1, 1908 


454 


4 


Apr. 1, 1924 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


483 


3y 2 


Apr. 1, 1924 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1901 


246 


3V 2 


July 1, 1924 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1902 


275 


3V 2 


July 1, 1924 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1903 


299 


4 


July 1, 1924 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1904 


323 


4 


July 1, 1924 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1906 


376 


4 


July 1,1924 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1905 


Reg. 148 


3V 2 


Apr. 1, 1925 






1,000 


April 1, 1907 


Reg. 35 


4 


Apr. 1, 1925 






2,000 


April 1, 1908 


455 


4 


Apr. 1, 1925 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


484 


3y 2 


Apr. 1, 1925 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1901 


247 


3y 2 


July 1, 1925 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1902 


276 


3y 2 


July 1, 1925 


1,000 


1,000 




July 1, 1903 


300 
Amounts 


4 
carried 


July 1, 1925 
forward. . 


1,000 


1,000 






$133,000 


$59,000 



46 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 
SBWER LOAN BONDS.— Continued 



DATE. 



July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1906 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1909 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1901 
July 1,1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
July 1, 1906 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
April 1, 1905 
■\pril 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907- 
April 1, 1908 



Number of Bonds. 



Amounts 

324 

377 
Reg. 149 
Reg. 36 

456 

485 

248 

277 

301 

325 

378 
Reg. 150 
Reg. 37 

457 

486 

249 

278 

302 

326 
Reg. 151 
Reg. 38 

458 

487 

250 

303 

327 
Reg. 152 
Reg. 39 

459 

Amounts 



Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 



brought 

4 

4 

3% 
4 
4 

sv 2 

3% 

sv 2 

4 

4 

4 

3% 

4 

4 

3% 

3% 

3% 

4 

4 

3% 

4 

4 

3y 2 

3% 



3% 
4 

4 

carried 



When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


forward. . 




July 1, 1925 


$1,000 


July 1.. 1925 


1,000 


Apr. 1, 1926 




Apr. 1, 1926 




Apr. 1, 1926 


1,000 


Apr. 1, 1926 


1,000 


July 1, 1926 


1,000 


July 1, 1926 


1,000 


July 1, 1926 


1,000 


July 1, 1926 


1,000 


July 1, 1926 


1,000 


Apr. 1, 1927 




Apr. 1, 1927 




Apr. 1, 1927 


1,000 


Apr. 1, 1927 


1,000 


July 1, 1927 


1,000 


July 1, 1927 


1,000 


July 1, 1927 


1,000 


July 1, 1927 


1,000 


Apr. 1, 1928 




Apr. 1, 1928 




Apr. 1, 1928 


1,000 


Apr. 1, 1928 


1,000 


July 1, 1928 


1,000 


July 1, 1928 


1,000 


July 1, 1928 


1,000 


Apr. 1, 1929 




Apr. 1, 1929 




Apr. 1, 1929 


1,000 


forward. . 





Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 



$133,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,000 



1,000' 



$154,000 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTORS REFORT. 
SEWER LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 



April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1904 
April 1, 1905 

April 1, 1907 

April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1901 

t\pril 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1,1908 
April 1, 1909 
July 1, 1901 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
April I, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 
April 1, 1905 
April 1, 1907 
April 1, 1908 
April 1, 1909 



Number of Bonds. 



Amounts 

488 
251 

328 
Reg. 153 
Reg. 40 

460 
Reg. 64 

252 
Reg. 154 
Reg. 41 

461 
Reg. 65 

253 
Reg. 155 
Reg. 42 

462 
Reg. 66 
Reg. 156 
Reg. 43 

463 
Reg. 67 
Reg. 157 
Reg. 44 

464 
Reg. 68 
Reg. 158 
Reg. 45 

465 

494 
Amounts 



Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 



brought 
3% 
3% 
4 

3% 
4 
4 

3& 
3% 
3% 
4 
4 

SV 2 
3% 
3V 2 
4 
4 

3% 
SV 2 
4 
4 

3% 
3% 
4 
4 

3V 2 
3% 
4 
4 

3% 

carried 



When Due. 



forward. . 

Apr. 1, 1929 

July 1, 1929 

July 1, 1929 

Apr. 1, 1930 

Apr. 1, 1930 

Apr. 1, 1930 

Apr. 1, 1930 

July 1, 1930 

Apr. 1, 1931 

Apr. 1, 1931 

Apr. 1, 1931 

Apr. 1, 1931 

July 1, 1931 

Apr. 1, 1932 

Apr. 1, 1932 

Apr. 1, 1932 

Apr. 1, 1932 

Apr. 1, 1933 

Apr. 1, 1933 

Apr. 1, 1933 

Apr. 1, 1933 

Apr. 1, 1934 

Apr. 1, 1934 

Apr. 1, 1934 

Apr. 1, 1934 

Apr. 1, 1935 

Apr. 1, 1935 

Apr. 1, 1935 

Apr. 1, 1935 

forward, . 



Denomi- 
nation. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 



1,000 



1,000 



1,000 



1,000 



1,000 



1,000 



1,000 
1,000 



Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 



$154,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 



1,000 



1,000 



1,000 



1,000 



1,000 



1,000 



1,000 
1,000 

$166,000 



48 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 
SEWER LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When Due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 


Amount 

Reg. 
Bonds. 




Amounts • 


brought 


forward. . . 





$166,000 


$94,000 


April 1, 1907 


Reg. 46 


4 


Apr. 1, 1936 






2,000 


April 1, 1908 


466 


4 


Apr. 1, 1936 


$1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


495 


3% 


Apr. 1, 1936 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1907 


Reg. 47 


4 


Apr. 1, 1937 






2,000 


April 1, 1908 


467 


4 


Apr. 1, 1937 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


496 


3V 2 


Apr. 1, 1937 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1908 


468 


4 


Apr. 1, 1938 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


497 


BV 2 


Apr. 1, 1938 


1,000 


1,000 




April 1, 1909 


498 


3^ 


Apr. 1, 1939 


1,000 


1,000 
$173,000 




i \ 


$98,000 



Coupon Bonds . 
Registered Bonds 



$173,000 
98,000 



Total amount of Sewer Loan Bonds under debt limit, $271,000 



ArTENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 49 



SEWER LOAN BONDS— Concluded. 
ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF CHAPTER 357, ACTS OF 1895, BEYOND THE LIMIT 

FIXED BY LAW. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


July J 


L, 1895 


126 to 128 


4 


July 1, 1910 


$1,000 


$3,000 


July J 


t, 1895 


129 to 131 


4 


July 1,1911 


1,000 


3,000 


July ] 


L, 1895 


132 to 134 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


3,000 


July ] 


L, 1895 


135 to 137 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


3,000 


July ] 


L, 1895 


133 to 140 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


3,000 


July ] 


L, 1895 


141 to 143 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


3,000 


July J 


I, 1895 


144 to 146 


4 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


3,000 


July ] 


L, 1895 


147 to 149 


4 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


3,000 


July J 


L, 1895 


150 to 152 


4 


July 1, 1918 


1,000 


3,000 


July ] 


L, 1895 


153 to 155 


4 


July 1, 1919 


1,000 


3,000 


J«ly - 


I, 1895 


156 to 158 


4 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


3,000 


July ] 


L, 1895 


159 to 161 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


3,000 


July - 


L, 1895 


162 to 164 


4 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


3,000 


July ] 


L, 1895 


165 to 167 


4 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1 


L, 1895 


168 to 170 


4 


July 1, 1924 


1,000 


3,000 


July : 


[, 1895 
1 amount 


171 to 173 
of Sewer Loan 


4 
Bonds 


July 1, 1925 
under above 


1,000 

Act. . 


3,000 


Tota 


$48,000 



City Loan Paving Bonds. 

ISSUED UNDER. AUTHORITY OF CHAPTER 153, ACTS OF 1892, BEYOND 

THE LIMIT FIXED BY LAW. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


October 1, 1892 
October 1, 1892 
October 1, 1892 


86 to 90 

91 to 95 

.96 to 100 

Total amount of 


4 
4 
4 

Paving 


Oct. 1, 1910 
Oct. 1, 1911 
Oct. 1, 1912 

Bonds. . 


$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 


$5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

$15,000 



50 



ANNUAL KEPOKTS. 
Water Loan Bonds. 



DATE. 



July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct: 1 
Oct. 1 

July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 



, 1888 
, 1889 
, 1890 
, 1888 
, 1889 
, 1890 
, 1888 
, 1889 
, 1890 
, 1888 
, 1889 
, 1890 
, 1888 
, 1889 
, 1890 
, 1888 
, 1889 
, 1890 
, 1888 
, 1889 
, 1890 
, 1888 
, 1889 
, 1890 
, 1888 
, 1889 
, 1890 



Number of Bonds. 



294 

Reg. 103 

426 to 427 

295 
Reg. 104 
428 to 429 

296 
Reg. 105 
430 to. 431 

297 
Reg. 106 
432 to 433 

298 
Reg. 107 
434 to 435 

299 
Reg. 108 
436 to 437 

300 
Reg. 109 
438 to 439 

301 
Reg. 110 
440 to 441 

302 
Reg. Ill 
442 to 443 

Amounts 



Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 



4 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

carried 



When Due. 



July 1, 1910 
Oct. 1, 1910 
Oct. 1, 1910 
July 1, 1911 
Oct. 1, 1911 
Oct. 1, 1911 
July 1, 1912 
Oct. 1, 1912 
Oct. 1, 1912 
July 1, 1913 
Oct. 1, 1913 
Oct. 1, 1913 
July 1, 1914 
Oct. 1, 1914 
Oct. 1, 1914 
July 1, 1915 
Oct. 1, 1915 
Oct. 1, 1915 
July 1, 1916 
Oct. 1, 1916 
Oct. 1, 1916 
July 1, 1917 
Oct. 1, 1917 
Oct. 1, 1917 
July 1, 1918 
Oct. 1, 1918 
Oct. 1, 1918 
forward. . 



Denomi- 
nation. 



$1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 

1,000 



Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 



$1,000 

2,000 
1,000 

2.000 
1,000 

2,000 
1,000 

2,000 
1,000 

2,000 
1,000 

2,000 
1,000 

2,000 
1,000 

2,000 
1,000 

2,000 
$27,000 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 51 



WATER LOAN BONDS.— Concluded. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 


Amount 

Reg. 
Bonds. 


Oct. 1, 1889 
Oct. 1, 1890 
Oct. 1, 1890 


Amounts 
Reg. 112 
444 to 445 
440 to 447 


brought 
4 
4 

4 


forward. . 
Oct. 1, 1919 
Oct. 1, 1919 
Oct. 1,1920 


$1,000 
1,000 


$27,000 

2,000 
2,000 


$23,000 
2,000 


$31,000 


$25,000 



Coupon Bonds . 
Registered Bonds 

Total amount Water Loan Bonds . . 



$31,000 
25,000 

$56,000 



52 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan Bonds. 

ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF CHAPTER 225, ACTS OF 1902, BEYOND THE LIMIT 

FIXED BY LAW. 



DATE. 



July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 



3902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 



Number of Bonds. 



Reg. 181 
Reg. 161 
Reg. 162 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 



Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 



3% 

sy 2 

3% 

3V 2 

3y 2 
3y 2 

3V 3 

3y 2 

3% 

3y 2 

3% 

3y 2 

3y 2 
3% 
3y 2 
3y 2 
3y 2 

3% 

3y 2 



When due. 



July 1,1910 
July 1, 1911 
July 1, 1912 
July 1, 1913 
July 1, 1914 
July 1, 1915 
July 1, 1916 
July 1, 1917 
July 1, 1918 
July 1, 1919 
July 1, 1920 
July 1, 1921 
July 1, 1922 
July 1, 1923 
July 1, 1924 
July 1, 1925 
July 1, 1926 
July 1, 1927 
July 1, 1928 
July 1, 1929 



Denomi- 
nation. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

$17,000 



Amount 

Reg. 
Bonds. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



$3,000 



Coupon Bonds . 
Registered Bonds 



$17,000 
3,000 



Total amount Met. Park Assessment Loan Bonds, $20,000 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 53 



Lowell Street Bridge Loan Bonds. 

ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF CHAPTER 307, ACTS OF 1900. 



DATE. 



1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 



Numbe^ of Bonds. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

t 
o 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

1G 

17 

18 

19 

20 
Reg. 59 
Reg. 60 
Reg. 61 
Reg. 62 
Reg. 63 

26 

27 

23 

29 

Amounts 



Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 



3V 2 
3% 

3% 

3% 
3V 2 
3% 

3y 2 

3% 

3% 
3V 2 
3V 2 
3% 
3% 
8% 
3% 
3V 2 
3V 2 
3V 2 
3% 
3% 
3V 2 
3V 2 
3V 2 
3V 2 
3% 
3% 
3% 

carried 



When due. 



Apr. 1, 1910 
Apr. 1, 1911 
Apr. 1, 1912 
Apr. 1, 1913 
Apr. 1, 1914 
Apr. 1, 1915 
Apr. 1, 1916 
Apr. 1, 1917 
Apr. 1, 1918 
Apr. 1, 1919 
Apr. 1, 1920 
Apr. 1, 1921 
Apr. 1, 1922 
Apr. 1, 1923 
Apr. 1, 1924 
Apr. 1, 1925 
Apr. 1, 1926 
Apr. 1, 1927 
Apr. 1, 1928 
Apr. 1, 1929 
Apr. 1, 1930 
Apr. 1, 1931 
Apr. 1, 1932 
Apr. 1, 1933 
Apr. 1, 1934 
Apr. 1, 1935 
Apr. 1, 1936 
Apr. 1, 1937 
Apr. 1, 1933 

forward. . 



Denomi- 
nation. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

$24,000 



Amount 

Reg. 
Bonds. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



$5,000 



54 



DATE. 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 
LOWELL STREET BRIDGE LOAN BONDS.-Concluded. 



Number of Bonds. 



Amounts 



April 1, 1909 


30 


April 1, 1909 


31 


April 1, 1909 


32 


April 1, 1909 


33 


April 1, 1909 


34 


April 1, 1909 


35 


April 1, 1909 


36 


April 1, 1909 


37 


April 1, 1909 


38 


April 1, 1909 


39 


April 1, 1909 


40 



Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 



brought 

3y 2 

3V 2 
3V 2 

3y 2 

3V 2 

sy 2 

3V 2 
3% 
3% 

3y 2 
3y 2 



When due. 



forward 
Apr. 1, 193 



Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 



1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 



Denomi- 
nation. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



Amount 
Coupon 
Bonds. 



$24,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

$35,000 



Amount 

Reg. 

Bonds. 



$5,000- 



$5,000 



Coupon Bonds 
Registered Bonds 



$35,000 
5,000 



Total amount of Lowell Street Bridge Loan Bonds, $40,000 



Recapitulation. 

City Loan Bonds $1,053,000 00 

Sewer Loan Bonds . ... 271,000 00 

Lowell Street Bridge Loan Bonds . . 40,000 00 

Total amount of Funded Debt within 

the limit provided by law 

Sewer Loan Bonds, issued under Chapter 

357, Acts of 1895 . . _ . . . $48,000 00 
City Loan Paving Bonds, issued under 

Chapter 153, Acts of 1892 . . . 15,000 00 

Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan Bonds, 

issued under Chapter 325, Acts of 1902, 20,000 00 

Total amount of Funded Debt outside 
of the limit allowed by law, issued 
under special Acts . . ... 
Water Loan Bonds 



. $1,364,000 00 



Total amount of Funded Debt 



83,000 00 
56,000 00 

$1,503,000 00 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEER AXD COLLECTORS EEPOET. 



55 



TABLE C. —STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS, SHOW1NQ APPROPRI 
ATIONS, EXPENDITURES, ETC., TO DECEMBER 31, 1909. 



Appropriations. 



CREDIT. 



Taxes, amount assessed for municipal purposes 
Property and Debt Balance, amount provided by issue 
of bonds 



DEBIT. 




Appropriations from tax levy: — 




Assessors 


$11,000 00 


City Auditor 


725 00 


City Clerk 


6,000 00 


City Engineer 


11,500 00 


City Messenger 


2,000 00 


City Solicitor 


2,450 00 


City Treasurer 


9,700 00 


Clerk of Committees and Departments 


4,800 00 


Contingent Fund 


2,500 00 


Election Expenses: — 




City Clerk 


1,900 00 


Commissioner of Public Buildings 


1,000 00 


Pay of Election Officers 


2,600 00 


Registrars of Voters 


1,700 00 


Electrical Department .... 


8,500 00 


Executive Department .... 


4,000 00 


Fire Department 


38,000 00 


Health Department .... 


8,000 00 


Health Department: — 




Collection of Ashes and Offal 


50,000 00 


Contagious Disease Hospital 


1,000 00 


Medical Inspection in Public Schools 


1,500 00 


Highways : — 




Suppression of Elm-Leaf Beetle . 


1,000 00 


Suppression of Gypsy and Brown-Tai 




Moths . . ' . 


3,800 00 


Inspection of Buildings .... 


4,450 00 


Interest 


75,000 00 


Military Aid 


900 00 


Police 


45,000 00 


Printing and Stationery 


750 00 


Public Buildings Maintenance: — 




City Buildings ...... 


11,000 00 


Fire Department .... 


5,000 00 


Janitors' Salaries .... 


30,000 00 


Schoolhouses 


34,000 00 


Public Grounds ..... 


11,750 00 


Public Library 


16,000 00 


Public Library. West Somerville Branch 


2,500 00 


Reduction of Funded Debt . 


145,000 00 


School Contingent 


27,000 00 


School Teachers' Salaries 


295,000 00 


Sealer of Weights and Measures . 


1,800 00 


Soldiers' Relief 


23,000 00 



$973,325 00 

190,000 00 

$1,163,325 00 



Amount carried forward 



$901,825 00 



56 



AXXUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward .... 

Somerville Hospital 

Street Lights 

Support of Poor: — 

City Home 

Miscellaneous 

Appropriations on Funded Debt account: 
Highways, Construction .... 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings . 
Sidewalks, Construction .... 

Public Buildings Construction, Building 

Public Buildings 

Sewers, Construction ..... 
Lowell Street Bridges 



$901,825 00 

5,000 00 

50,000 00 

3,000 00 
13,500 00 



$80,000 00 

8,000 00 

12,000 00 

20,000 00 
30,000 00 
40,000 00 



Assessors 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid George W. Perkins, salary as 

chairman of the board of assessors . $2,000 00 

Nathan H. Reed, assessor ... 800 00 

George E. Elliott, assessor . . . 800 00 

Winsor L. Snow, assessor . . . 800 00 

William A. Flaherty, assessor . . 800 00 

Fred B. Clapp, assistant assessor . . 250 00 

John F. Stackpole, assistant assessor . 250 00 

James A. Butler, assistant assessor . 250 00 

James Wilson, assistant assessor . . 250 00 

George I. Canfield, assistant assessor . 250 00 

J. Robert Fenelon. assistant assessor . 250 00 

Jennie L. Jones, first assistant clerk . 800 00 

carfares 18 10 

Mabel E. Hall, second assistant clerk . 600 00 

carfares 4 50 

Abbie D. Southworth, third assistant 

clerk . 600 00 

carfares 60 

Theodore H. Locke, clerical services . 40 00 

Raymond A. Farr, clerical services . 44 00 

Frank H. Smith, clerical services . 50 00 

Stanley C. Converse, clerical services . 50 00 

Florence Ham, clerical services . . 152 68 

Josephine M. Briggs, clerical services . 136 01 

Bertha M. Boyd, clerical services . . 129 34 

Edith H. Bradford, clerical services . 96 00 

Jane A. Smith, clerical services . . 96 00 

May F. Dutton, clerical services . . 74 00 

Mabel F. Kenneson, clerical services . 73 33 

Amount carried forward .... $9,664 56 



$973,325 00 



190,000 00 
$1,163,325 00 



$11,000 00 
189 24 

$10,810 76 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



57 



Amount brought forward . 
Florence R. Kenneson, clerical services, 
L. E. Clayton, elastic 
Glines & Co., expressing 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directory 
E. F. Hicks, lunch .... 
N. Allen Lindsey & Co., assignees 

Williams & Neiley, precinct lists 
Wesley A. Maynard, advertising . 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., stamps 
Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., supplies 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
Somerville Post-office, postage 
Samuel Ward Co., stationery . 
Williams & Neiley, printing . 
Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Co., stationery 



$9,664 56 




70 00 




1 00 




30 




4 00 




10 00 




554 00 




31 91 




1 

45 98 




1 30 




1 85 




153 35 




24 00 




238 71 




7 00 




2 80 






$10,810 76 





Benjamin G. Brown School, Land Addition. 

CREDIT. 

Sewers Construction account, amount transferred 
Balance to credit of account, 1910 



$1,500 00 
1,500 00 



Cash. 



RECEIPTS. 



Balance from 1908 . 

City Clerk 

City Engineer 

City Solicitor . 

City Treasurer 

Clerk of Committees and Departments 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Contingent Fund 

County of Middlesex .... 
Electrical Department .... 
Executive Department .... 
Fire Department . 

Funded Debt 

Grade Crossings 

Health Department .... 

Health Department, Collection of Ashe 

and Offal . . 
Health Department, Contagious Disease 

Hospital 
Health Department, Contagious Disease 

Hospital, Accounts for Collection 
Highway Betterment Assessments 
Highways, Construction 
Highways, Maintenance 
Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings 
Highways, Suppression of Gypsy and 

Brown-tail Moths 
Highways, Sprinkling Streets 
Inspection of Buildings . 

Amounts carried forward . 



$2,628 55 

850 00 

10 38 

5,190 09 

16 17 

33,144 54 

139 00 

4,396 11 

186 50 

28 45 

1,344 67 

190,000 00 

63,516 54 

635 36 

9,018 26 

5,538 44 

1,956 43 

7,080 06 

7,230 46 

20,822 17 

47 31 

1 50 

188 47 

41 25 



$55,109 24 



$354,010 71 $55,109 24 



58 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 

Interest 

Metered Water Charges 

Police 

Public Buildings Maintenance: — 
City Buildings . 
Schoolhouses 
Public Grounds 
Public Library 
Public Library, Frances A. Wilder Chil 

dren's Department Fund, Income 
Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, In 

come, Art 

Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, In 

come, Poetry .... 

Public Library, West Somerville Branch 
Public. Library Construction, West Somer 

ville Branch . 
Redemption of Tax Liens 
Reduction of Funded Debt . 
School Contingent . 
School Teachers' Salaries 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Sewer Assessments 
Sewers, Construction 
Sewers, , Maintenance 
Sidewalk Assessments 
Sidewalks, Construction 
Sidewalks, Maintenance . 
Soldiers' Relief 

State Aid 

Support of Poor, City Home 

Support of Poor, Miscellaneous. 

Taxes .... 

Temporary Loans . 

Water Maintenance 

Water Service Assessments 

Water Works Income . 



$354,010 71 

12,395 32 

24,971 96 

3,344 01 

741 23 

166 87 
512 84 
790 63 

4 40 

260 40 

65 10 
133 27 



$55,109 24 



10 
56 
50 



10,132 50 

667 97 

891 

404 

3 

503 

2,340 

259 

1,230 

13,412 

23 



77 
50 
56 
43 
47 
00 
00 
75 
17 



9 
93 

5,027 

3,170 

1,260,893 34 

625,000 00 

24,559 

3,816 

207,615 



91 
32 
96 





U,tJtJ 1 ,Ut/U 1 1/ 


1 


$2,612,648 03 


PAYMENTS. 




Assessors 


$10,810 76 


City Auditor 


704 43 


City Clerk 


8,558 78 


City Engineer 


12,319 14 


City Messenger 


1,892 09 


City Solicitor 


2,390 07 


City Treasurer . ... 


14,682 75 


Clerk of Committees and Departments 


4,754 02 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts 


185,724 68 


Contingent Fund 


2,561 28 


County of Middlesex .... 


67,627 10 




47,357 50 


Election Expenses: — 




City Clerk 


1,268 08 


Commissioner of Public Buildings 


722 91 


Pay of Election Officers 


2,538 00 



Amount carried forward 



$363,911 59 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



59 



Collection of Ashes 
Contagious Disease 



Amount brought forward . 

Registrars of Voters 
Electrical Department .... 
Electrical Department, Underground Con 

struction 

Executive Department .... 

Fire Department 

Grade Crossings 

Health Department 
Health Department, 

and Offal 
Health Department, 

Hospital 
Health Department, Medical Inspection in 

Public Schools 
Highways, Construction 
Highways Construction, Lowell Street 

Bridges 

Highways, Maintenance 
Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings 
Highways, Suppression of Elm-leaf Beetle, 
Highways, Suppression of Gypsy and 

Brown-tail Moths 
Highways, Sprinkling Streets 
Inspection of Buildings . 

Interest 

Military Aid .... 
Overlay and Abatement 

Police 

Printing and Stationery 

Public Buildings Construction: — 

Bath House Addition 

Contagious Disease Hospital 

Cummings School Sanitaries 

Davis School Sanitaries . 

High School Building 

Highland School, Heating and Ven 
tilating 
Public Buildings Maintenance: — 

City Buildings . 

Fire Department 

Janitors' Salaries 

Schoolhouses 
Public Grounds 
Public Library 
Public Library, Isaac 

come, Art 
Public Library, Isaac 

come, Poetry 
Public Library, West Somerville Branch 
Public Library Construction, West Somer 

ville Branch ..... 
Redemption of Tax Liens 
Reduction of Funded Debt . 
School Contingent 
School Teachers' Salaries 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Sewers, Construction 
Sewers, Maintenance 

Amount carried forward 



Pitman Fund, In 
Pitman Fund, In 



Addition 



$363,911 59 
1,547 97 
8,556 62 

3,742 97 

3,965 56 

79,541 88 

65,591 07 

11,746 85 

64,091 25 

8,490 83 

1,427 45 
86,707 35 

8,432 87 

68,027 68 

15,718 26 

846 80 

3,274 76 
30,854 76 

4,660 20 
29,096 12 

1,020 00 

53 34 

91,690 53 

1,735 23 



1,362 
4,062 
1,514 
1,581 



03 
40 
25 

72 
00 



8,013 99 

14,370 42 

6,081 78 

30,921 80 

40,614 42 

12,244 00 

20,586 74 

168 75 

55 13 
2,633 27 

10,582 02 

652 97 

157,500 00 

27,448 10 

293,209 85 

2,281 52 

16,029 98 

13,200 90 

$1,620,675 98 



60 



ANNUAL BEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward 
Sidewalks, Construction 
Sidewalks, Maintenance 
Soldiers' Burials 
Soldiers' Monument 
Soldiers' Relief 
Somerville Hospital 
State Aid 
Street Lights . 
Support of Poor, City Home 
Support of Poor, Miscellaneous 
Temporary Loans 
Water Loan Interest 
Water Maintenance 
Water Works, Abatements 

Charges 
Water Works Extension 



Balance to debit of account, 1910 





$1,620,675 98 




24,256 56 


. 


1,168 m 




481 00 


. 


11,934 30 




23,294 64 




5,000 00 




16,680 00 




52,298 63 




7,562 83 




16,843 17 




650,000 00 




1,120 00 




50,294 68 


n Watei 




. m 


183 63 


• 


18,014 40 




$2,499,808 48 


1 .-,,::- jo 




$2,612,648 03 



City Auditor. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Clarence T. Bruce, salary as 

auditor 

disbursements ..... 
Pneumatic Lland Stamp Co., rubber 
stamps . . . . . 



$725 00 
20 57 



$704 43 



$700 00 
2 74 




1 69 


$704 43 





City Clerk. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Cash, received of Frederic W 
Recording mortgages 
Dog licenses 
Marriage certificates 
Amusements 
Transporting liquors 
Junk licenses 
Badges 

Street musicians 
Copies of records 
Fireworks 
Liquor licenses . 

Amounts carried forward 



Cook, city clerk: — 



.... 


$6,000 00 


isferred . 


69 77 




$5,930 23 


lerk . 

$487 50 




367 00 




769 00 




154 23 




10 00 




265 00 




1 75 




16 00 




110 50 




49 00 




39 00 





$2,268 98 



$5,930 23 



APPENDIX TO TREAS 

Amounts brought forward 
Billiards and pool 
Intelligence offices 
Auctioneers' licenses 
Slaughtering 
Drivers' licenses 
Wagon stands 
Private detectives 
Sale of old ballots 
Interest on deposits 
Hackney carriage 
Oil certificates 
Wagon licenses . 



LLECTOR S REPORT. 01 


$2,268 98 


$5,930 23 


120 00 




12 00 




42 00 




7 00 




9 00 




4 00 




10 00 




3 00 




10 57 




15 00 




1 00 




126 00 






2,628 55 





$3,558 78 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Frederic W. Cook, salary as 

city clerk 

Howard E. Wemyss, assistant city 

clerk 

Clara B. Snow, first assistant . 
Edith A. Woodman, second assistant 
Alice M. Vincent, third assistant 
Florence H. Plimpton, fourth assistant 
Josephine M. Briggs, clerical services 
Florence A. Kenneson, clerical services 
American Express Co., expressing . 
American Surety Co. of New York, pre 

mium 

Allen, Doane & Co., badges 
American Multigraph Sales Co., type 
Marion G. Bourne, canvassing 
T. H. Ball, forms .... 
Bicknell & Fuller Paper Box Co., boxes 
Brown's Express, expressing . 
Boston Envelope & Printing Co., en 

velopes 

Justin J. Bradshaw & Co., scrap book 

May G. Canfield, canvassing . 

The Carter's Ink Co., ink, etc. 

F. W. Cook, ledger bulletin . . . 

S. H. Chamberlain, repairing stamps 

Damon of Boston, year book . 

George E. Damon & Co., blank forms 

Estate of Charles E. Davis, canvassing 

Clara Z. Elliot, canvassing 

The Fairbanks Co., scale . 

Annie M. Gilcrease, canvassing 

Glines & Co., expressing . 

W. A. Greenough & Co., directory 

Thomas Groom & Co., books . 

Gilman Express Co., expressing 

Hobbs & Warren Co., blanks . 

Library Bureau, cards 

William M. L. McAdams, stationery 

Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 



$2,700 00 

1,400 00 
800 00 
600 00 
5S8 50 
600 00 
118 67 

3 33 

4 28 

8 00 
2 75 

4 90 
15 70 

4 20 

18 18 
40 

5 20 
2 25 

38 40 

27 50 



00 
10 
00 
10 

20 



14 10 

3 00 

80 50 
75 

4 00 
40 25 

15 
2 72 

13 85 
7 50 

10 25 



Amount carried forward 



$7,127 73 



62 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Monarch Typewriter Co., machine, etc 
McGrath & Woodley, binding 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., stamps 
A. G. Renner, expressing . 
Sampson & Murdock Co., directory 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
Somerville Post-office, postage 
Sundry Persons, returns of births . 
Sundry Persons, returns of deaths . 
Richard H. Thicker, canvassing 
Thorpe's Express, expressing . 

. Samuel Ward Co., stationery . 
Williams & Neiley, printing 



City Engineer. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 

Stock and labor billed other departments: 
Highways Construction account, labor 
Lowell Street Bridges account, services 
Public Grounds account, services 
Sewers Construction account, labor . 
Sewers Maintenance account, services 



Cash, received of abutters as follows: — 
West street, plan 
Merriam street, plan . 
Mallet street, plan 
Parker street, plan 
Fremont avenue, plan 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Ernest W. Bailey, salary as city 
engineer .... 

Engineer's assistants 
Engineer's assistants, carfares 
American Express Co., expressing 
D. J. Bennett, repairing . 
Buff & Buff Mfg. Co., tape 
L. E. Clayton, cloth . 
Davenport-Brown Co., stakes . 
H. C. Dimond & Co., type 
Frost & Adams Co., paper 
Glines & Co., expressing . 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 
Gilman & Co., expressing 

Amount carried forward 



$7,127 73 




111 40 




40 50 

L 




1 

172 57 




4 04 




35 




6 00 




156 40 




172 92 




412 00 




180 00 




76 50 




50 




93 87 




4 00 






$8,558 78 






$11,500 00 


nsferred . 


30 86 



$200 00 


125 00 


200 00 


225 00 


75 00 


$5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 



$3,000 00 


8,455 19 


268 63 


75 


8 30 


6 50 


5 45 


5 74 


4 75 


19 40 


90 


21 00 


1 15 



$11,469 14 



825 00 



25 00 



$12,319 14 



$11,797 76 



AtTENBIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S RETORT. 



63 



$11,707 76 


28 25 


13 40 


1 00 


1 03 


3 00 


104 43 


25 


10 00 


1 62 


72 90 


10 50 


216 00 


15 


30 


35 


36 08 


4 20 


14 12 


1 00 


70 


1 80 


30 



Amount brought forward . 

P. J. Kinnear, horseshoeing 

Ledder & Probst, screws . 

Library Bureau, cards 

B. L. Makepeace, blue prints 

Municipal Journal, subscription 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 
Co. . . . . m . 

The Phillips Co., repairing screw 

Wilbur P. Rice, stakes 

Spanieling Print Paper Co., paper 

Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., type- 
writer and supplies 

Somerville Post-office, postage 

James Tevlin, board of horse . 

Thorpe's Express, expressing . 

Underhill Hardware Co., oil and emery 

M. L. Vinal, books . 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co., supplies 

W. W. White & Co., mounting 

Whitney & Snow, hardware 

George A. Watts, envelope sealer 

I. B. Walker, repairing 

Samuel Ward Co., paper . 

F. S. Webster Co., cutters 



City Messenger. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid Jairus Mann, salary as city mes- 
senger ....*... $1,500 00 

disbursements 5 75 

H. A. Brownell, repairing horse cover . 4 40 

Thomas Groom & Co., supplies . . 2 75 

Jameson Brothers, board of horse . . 306 00 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 15 49 

Pearl-street Shoeing Forge, shoeing . 25 60 
R. C. Small & Co., repairing and painting 

buggy ... ... 30 85 

Charles L. Underhill, carriage repairs . 1 25 

City Solicitor. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 ..... 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 



$12,319 14 



$2,000 00 
107 91 

$1,892 09 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of Town of Sutton, costs 



$1,892 09 



$2,450 00 
70 31 

$2,379 69 

10 38 



$2,390 07 



<u 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid Frank W. Kaan, salary as city 

solicitor 

disbursements .... 
Thomas Damery, salary as claim agent 

disbursements .... 
Benjamin F. Freeman, photographs 
Sprague & Hathaway Co., map 



$2,100 00 


183 12 


100 00 


1 20 


4 00 


1 75 



$2,390 07 



City Treasurer. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, fees for collecting 

National Bank tax 

Redemption of Tax Liens, fees for releasing tax liens 
Cash, received of sundry persons, certifi- 
cates $175 00 

Sundry persons, costs on taxes and 
assessments 5,010 09 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Joseph S. Pike, salary as city 

treasurer ...... 

Charles L. Ellis, deputy collector of 

taxes 

disbursements 

Beulah M. Peirce, first assistant 

Louise B. McLaughlin, second assistant, 

Florence M. Grow, third assistant . 

Marion C. Kendall, fourth assistant 

Winnifred P. Briggs, fifth assistant 

Susan L. Briggs, clerical services . 

Lilla A. Johnson, clerical services . 

Roberta B. McDonald, clerical services . 

Dorothy S. Hopkins, clerical services . 

Ednah A. Whitney, clerical services 

Charles E. Davis, fees for collecting de- 
linquent taxes 

F. W. Hopkins, fees for collecting de- 
linquent taxes 

Malcolm E. Sturtevant, fees for collect- 
ing delinquent taxes .... 

Theodore H. Locke, fees for collecting 
delinquent taxes, and services 

National Security Bank, clearing house 
charges 

Amount carried forward .... 



$3,000 00 

1,450 00 

22 40 

1,000 00 

700 00 

550 00 

600 00 

528 81 

309 35 

321 35 

73 33 

73 33 

60 00 

25 00 



61 50 


392 76 


147 27 


1 85 



$9,700 00 
236 16 

$9,463 84 



13 82 
15 00 



5,185 09 
$14,677 75 



$9,316 95 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. G5 



Amount brought forward . 
Beacon Trust Co., clearing house 

charges 

City Trust Co., clearing house charges 
Somerville National Bank, clearing 

house charges .... 

American Surety Co. of New York, pre 

miums on collectors' bonds . 
American Express Co., expressing 
Boston News Bureau, subscription . 
Burroughs Adding Machine Co. 

machine and supplies 
A. W. Babbitt, check register . 
Brandt Cashier Co., rental of machine 
Charles E. Berry, making pin . 
E. J. Cambridge, stamps and envelopes 
Carter's Ink Co., ink 
City Trust Co., charges for preparation 

of bonds 

Edwin O. Childs, recording documents 
George E. Damon Co., year book . 
Fisher & Fowler, attention to adding 
machine ...... 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directories 
Globe-Wernicke Co., guides and folders 
William S. Howe, pay-roll box 
The J. C. Hall Co., lithograph checks 
Howard Lowell & Son, carriage hire 
Henry Lorentzen, work on safe 
McGrath & Woodley, funded debt reg- 
isters 

Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., service . . . $129 71 
(Cash) 5 00 



National Association of Comptrollers, 
dues 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., supplies 

Edwin L. Pride, auditing . 

Somerville Journal Co., printing and ad 
vertising ..... 

Sampson & Murdock Co., directory 

Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., repairs 

Walter H. Snow, catering 

Thorpe's Express, expressing 

Turner & Co., stationery . 

A. B. Tyler, stamps . 

Winter-hill Press, printing 

Yale & Towne Mfg. Co., cleaning and 
insuring lock 



$9,31G 95 

40 

57 

30 

1S4 00 
50 

21 60 

442 20 

11 00 

8 00 

75 

1,403 34 

2 25 

200 00 

22 00 
2 00 

4 41 

320 30 
11 00 

5 12 
4 30 

47 50 

111 00 

8 00 

39 00 
186 51 



124 71 

10 00 

1 75 

350 00 

1,599 77 
6 00 

1 00 
12 00 

2 50 
145 77 

50 00 
6 25 

15 00 



$14,677 75 



Clerk of Committees and Departments. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 

Amount carried forward 



$4,800 00 
62 15 

$4,737 85 



66 



ANNUAL ItEPOftTS. 



Amount brought forward .... 
Receipts: — 
Cash, received of William P. Mitchell, paste 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid William P. . Mitchell, salary as 
clerk of committees and departments 

Lawrence S. Howard, assistant 

Lucia A. Manning, assistant 

Bessie L. L. Crosby, assistant . 

Florence Ham, clerical services 

E. J. Cambridge, postage . 

Globe- Wernicke Co., cards and cabinet 

W. A. Greenough & Co., directory . 

Glines & Co., expressing . 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 

Howard Lowell & Son, carriage hire 

New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., service . . . $81 99 
(Cash) 15 92 



Somerville Journal Co., envelopes, etc. , 
Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., sta- 
tionery 

Sampson & Murdock Co., directory 



$2,100 00 

1,200 00 

600 00 

538 05 

29 34 

86 26 

10 25 

4 00 
15 

67 88 

5 00 



6Q 07 

22 50 

2 60 
6 00 



$4,737 85 

25 

$4,738 10 



$4,738 10 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 



CREDIT. 



State Tax . . " , . 

National Bank Tax . 

Metropolitan Sewer Tax: — 
Sinking Fund Requirements 
Interest . . . . 

Maintenance 

Metropolitan Park Tax: — 

Sinking Fund Requirements 
Interest .... 

Maintenance 



$7,779 99 
27,189 16 
21,215 16 



$4,314 08 
11,862 20 
15,463 16 



Grade Crossings Tax 

Middlesex Avenue or Wellington Bridge Tax: — 

Special Assessment $4,632 94 

Interest 262 22 

Maintenance 841 92 



Metropolitan Water Assessment, 1909: — 
Sinking Fund Requirements . 

Interest 

Maintenance . . . . 



$24,812 23 
66,540 41 
21,220 56 



$78,930 00 
1,379 13 



56,184 31 



31,639 44 
2,443 07 



5,737 08 



112,573 20 



Amount carried forward 



$288,886 23 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 67 



Amount brought forward 
Cash .... 



DEBIT 

Balance from 1908 . 

Grade Crossings 

Corporation Taxes, 1908 

Corporation Taxes, 1909 

National Bank Tax, 1909 

Support of Poor, Miscellaneous 

School Contingent, tuition 

Street Railway Tax 

Boston Elevated Railway Tax 

Contagious Disease Hospital 

Health Department 

Fees for collecting National Bank Tax 

Cash 



$11,434 

6 

6,262 

11,862 

2,323 

1,255 



00 
91 
10 
20 
45 



288,886 23 



«J«J,X'±'± ut 


$322,030 77 


$18,038 00 


25,577 51 


5,346 25 


26,357 24 


3,481 19 


958 93 


246 00 


45,778 32 


9,236 99 


1,133 28 


138 56 


13 82 


185,724 68 

<n<K> nqn 77 



State Aid, 1909 
Soldiers' Burials, 1909 
Military Aid, 1909 . 



Balance to debit of account, December 31, 1909 
Contingent Fund. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry persons, licenses 

to peddle . . . . . . $100 00 

Sundry persons, druggists' licenses . 39 00 



1 DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid F. C. Ayer, lumber 

Brown's Express Co., expressing . 
W. S. Burbank & Co., use of hack . 
L. H. Brown, use of coupe 
William. C. Blake, Captain Company K, 
Eighth Regiment, M. V. M., rifle 
practice 



$13 24 
2 50 
5 00 
7 00 



250 00 



$16,592 00 
481 00 
510 00 

$17,583 00 
17,583 00 



$2,500 00 

77 72 

$2,422 28 



139 00 
$2,561 28 



Amount carried forward .... $277 74 



68 



ANNUAL ilEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 

John Bousfield, ringing bell . 

James Bartley, supplies 

Thomas F. Buckley, settlement of suit 

J. R. Bryan, rent of hall . 

Boardman's Band, music . 

Cambridge City Band, music . 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
twenty-five per cent, of liquor licenses, 

Jackson Caldwell & Co., chairs, etc 

Daniel E. Campbell," labor 

Mrs. D. Cass, collation 

L. E. Clayton, cloth and pins . 

John Cremen, labor . 

Directory Publishing Co., auto list 

John Donnelly & Sons, posting 

Sergeant Frank E. Draper Camp, 41, 
United Spanish War Veterans, appro- 
priation . . . 

Davis Square Auto Co., rent of auto 
mobile ..... 

Horace A. Edgecomb, reporting hear 
ing 

John H. Dusseault, disbursements 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co., con 
struction, etc. 

J. Fischer & Brother, music . 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 

Howard Gray, ringing bell 

E. F. Hicks, lunch 
S. Henry Hadley, disbursements 
Harvard Automobile Co., renting 
Jim Hodder, rent of hall . 
J. W. Howard, decorations, etc. 
Jacobs, Whitcomb & Co., flags 
M. D. Jones Co., markers 
King Philip Tavern Co., dinners 
H. A. Kendall, ringing bell 
John Kilty, labor 
Howard Lowell & Son, carriage hir 

F. Leonardi, band concert 

G. F. McKenna & Son, teaming 
Thomas D. Mitchell, sandwiches 
William Meskill, labor 
Jairus Mann, disbursements 
J. Edward L. McLean, carpentering 
New American House, dinners 
Oriental Tea Co., coffee . 
O. M. Pote, suit 
Asbury Strahan, ringing bell . 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
Somerville Post-office, envelopes and 

postage 

Somerville Y. M. C. A., rent of hall 

Walter H. Snow, catering 

M. G. Staples, ringing bell 

Corps Clarence Stewart Auxiliary, No 

19, U. S. W. V., allowance for lunch 
Somerville Military Band, services 

Amount carried forward 



$277 74 


9 00 


65 


125 00 


15 00 


85 00 


65 00 


10 00 


61 10 


2 00 


122 80 


2 08 


2 00 


2 00 


27 00 


75 00 


20 00 


10 00 


6 00 


33 38 


15 12 


10 75 


9 00 


84 00 


40 


22 00 


15 00 


63 70 


12 75 


13 00 


17 00 


10 00 


2 00 


21 00 


65 00 


9 00 


19 72 


2 00 


4 50 


112 00 


20 00 


4 94 


3 00 


9 00 


59 40 


99 15 


.25 00 


88 00 


10 00 


40 00 


168 00 



$1,985 18 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT 69 

Amount brought forward .... 
W. C. Towne, ringing bell 
Samuel Ward Co., inaugural invitations, 
Whitney & Snow, figures 
Carroll C. Whittemore, catering . 
Joseph E. Wiley, Captain Company M, 

Eighth Regiment, M. V. M., rifle 

practice 

Henry A. Wheeler & Co., rent of tent, 
Willard C. Kinsley Post, 139, G. A. R., 

decorating graves 

John M. Woods, disbursements 



$1,985 18 
10 00 
90 00 
18 65 
47 00 


250 00 
103 00 


12 20 
16 80 



$2,532 83 
Executive Department, postage and sta- 
tionery 28 45 



$480 00 


45 


00 


600 


00 


400 


00 


4,500 00 



$2,561 28 



County of Middlesex. 

CREDIT. 

Taxes, 1909, county tax . . . . . . . . $67,627 10 

Receipts: — 

Cash, received of J. O. Hayden, county 

treasurer, rent of court room . . $600 00 

return on amount received of the 

city for dog licenses . . . 3,796 11 

4,396 11 



$72,023 21 
Amounts transferred and unused: — 
Public Buildings Maintenance, City Build- 
ings account $600 00 

Public Library account .... 3,796 11 

4,396 11 

$67,627 10 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid County Tax $67,627 10 



Coupons. 

CREDIT. 

^Balance of coupons unpaid January 1, 1909 . . . $16,725 00 

Coupons maturing April 1, 1909: — 
Water Loan, $24,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. 

Sewer Loan, $2,000, six months at AV2 

per cent. ...... 

Sewer Loan, $30,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. ........ 

Paving Loan, $20,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. 

City Loan, $225,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. 

6,025 00 



Amount carried forward $22,750 00 



70 ANNUAL TtEPORTS. 

Amount brought forward $22,750 00 

Coupons maturing July 1, 1909: — 
City Loan, $158,000, six months at SV2 per 

cent. 

City Loan, $478,500, six months at 4 per 

cent. 

Sewer Loan, $38,000, six months at 3% per 

cent. . . . . 

Sewer Loan, $138,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. 

Metropolitan Park * Assessment Loan, 

$17,000, six months at 3% per cent. . 
Water Loan, $10,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. 

Coupons maturing October 1, 1909: — 
City Loan, $207,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. 

City Loan, $120,000, six months at 3% per 

cent. 

Sewer Loan, $2,000, six months at 4% per 

cent. 

Sewer Loan, $29,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. . . . . 

Sewer Loan, $25,000, six months at 3% per 

cent. 

Lowell Street Bridge Loan, $35,000, six 

months at 3^2 per cent. 
Paving Loan, $20,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. 

Water Loan, $24,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. 

Coupons maturing January 1, 1910: — 
City Loan, $416,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. 

City Loan, $141,000, six months at 3% per 

cent. 

Sewer Loan, $129,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. 

Sewer Loan, $37,000, six months at 3% per 

cent. 

Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan, 

$17,000, six months at 3% per cent. . 
Water Loan, $9,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. .... 



DEBIT. 

Cash, paid coupons . 

Coupons of 1909 unpaid 



Election Expenses, City Clerk. 

CREDIT. ' 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 $1,900 00 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred , 631 92 

i ' , $1,268 08 



$2,765 00 




9,570 00 




665 00 




2,760 00 




297 50 




200 00 


16,257 50 




$4,140 00 




2,100 00 




45 00 




580 00 




437 50 




612 50 




400 00 




480 00 


8,795 00 




$8,320 00 




2,467 50 




2,580 00 




647 50 




297 50 




180 00 


14,492 50 






$62,295 00 


$47,357 50 
14,937 50 


62,295 00 





APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 71 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid A. F. Carpenter, candles 
The Carter's Ink Co., ink 
Carter, Rice & Co., paper 
Frederic W. Cook, disbursements 
John Donnelly & Sons, posting 
Davis Square Stable, carriage hire 
Glines & Co., expressing 
O. L. Hill, use of car 
John H. Kelley, repairing boxes 
A. C. Libbey & Sons, supplies 
McGrath & Woodley, binding . 
Wesley A. Maynard, printing 
Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., stamps 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
Somerville Post-office, postage 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
Samuel Ward Co., fasteners, etc. 
Howard E. Wemyss, tape 



$ 65 


6 00 


55 20 


2 95 


32 00 


155 '00 


75 


30 00 


78 80 


11 90 


2 75 


142 50 


71 


736 96 


4 00 


6 09 


1 02 


80 



$1,268 08 



Election Expenses, Commissioner of Public Buildings. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Derby Desk Co., plate for desk, 
Eugene Girroir, carpenter work 
Godfrey Specialty Co., supplies 
Jim Hodder & Bros., rent of hall 
Joseph O. Hobbs, rent of hall 
T. E. Littlefield, lumber . 
G. F. McKenna & Son, teaming 
J. E. L. McLean, carpentering 
Charles F. Mills, carpentering 
Arthur G. Pearson, rent of hall 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
Underhill Hardware Co., hardware 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co., hardware . 



$5 00 


19 00 


62 03 


40 00 


25 00 


7 38 


89 51 


363 88 


24 50 


80 00 


76 


3 15 


2 70 



$1,000 00 
277 09 

$722 91 



$722 91 



Election Expenses, Pay of Election Officers. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Cash, paid election officers 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 



$2,600 00 
62 00 

$2,538 00 
$2,538 00 



72 



AXNUAL EEPOETS. 



Election Expenses, Registrars of Voters. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 . 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Lincoln, salary 



as 



Cash, paid Charles P 
registrar . . .' 
Charles E. Parks, salary as registrar 
Edwin D. Sibley, salary as registrar 
Frederic W. Cook, salary as registrar 
■ George E. Davis, clerical services 
Lawrence S. Howard, clerical services 
Frank E. Merrill, clerical services 
Fred E. Warren, clerical services . 
Howard E. Wemyss, clerical services 
John Donnelly & Sons, posting 
Thomas Groom & Co., book . 
Glines & Co., expressing 
Gridley Coffee House, lunch 
Library Bureau, cards 
Wesley A. Maynard, printing 
McGrath & Woodley, binding 
Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., stamp 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
Samuel Ward Co., stationery . 



$200 00 

200 00 

200 00 

200 00 

30 00 

3 00 

33 00 

30 00 

39 00 

46 00 

13 50 

25 

12 65 

1 44 

41 63 

6 50 

25 

442 00 

48 75 



$1,700 00 
152 03 

$1,547 97 



$1,547 97 



Electrical Department. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, 'balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of Edison Electric Illuminat- 
ing Co., grounding wires 
Brown & Simonds Co., fire alarm box . 
Cochrane Chemical Co., carboys re- 
turned 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Melvin F. Underwood, salary as 
commissioner of electric lines and 

lights 

Walter I. Fuller, salary a*s commissioner 
of electric lines and lights . 

disbursements 

Laborers 

American Express Co., expressing . 

Amount carried forward .... 



$125 00 
50 00 

11 50 



$163 76 

1,139 72 

12 55 

4,039 40 

6 40 



$5,361 83 



$8,500 00 
129 88 

$8,370 12 



186 50 
$*,556 62 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



73 



Amount brought forward . 
F. C. Ayer, lumber . 
American Steel & Wire Co., wire . 
Allen Brothers, stamp ribbons 
American Dyewood Co., vitriol 
Automatic Time Stamp Co., time stamp 
Bean's Pharmacies, syringe, etc. . 
Charles E. Berry, harness 
John F. Biggs & Co., envelopes 
D. J. Bennett, repairing . 
Beattie Zinc Works Co., zincs 
F. W. Barry, Beale & Co., stationery 
Brown's Express, expressing . 
Cameron Appliance Co., blocks 
Chandler & Farquhar Co., tools 
Clifton Mfg. Co., tape 
S. H. Couch Co., supplies 
Electric Goods Mfg. Co., batteries . 
Davenport-Brown Co., wood . 
Ferd. F. French & Co., buggy 
Fellows & Co., ladder, etc. 
Gamewell Fire Alarm Telegraph Co. 

supplies 

Thomas W. Gleason, repairing 
Glines & Co., expressing . 
Globe Gas Light Co., lantern . 
George E. Gilchrist Co., solder 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 
O. L. Hill, agent, use of auto, etc. 
Highland Press, printing . 
William S. Howe, clips . . 
Hoyt Electric Inst. Works, ammeter 

etc 

F. M. Kelson, sponge 

F. W. Kimball, show case, etc 

T. E. Littlefield, lumber . 

Mitchell Mfg. Co., figures 

D. McDonald, repairing 

Martin & Wood, moulding 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service ..... 
New York Insulated Wire Co., wire 
New American House, dinners 
Charles E. Perry Co., register paper 
W. E. Plumer & Co., supplies 
Pettingell-Andrews Co., supplies . 
John B. Rufer, repairing buggy 
A. G. Renner, expressing . 
Stilphen's Express, expressing 
Somerville Journal Co., police reports 
Standard Plate Glass Co., glass 
Sartwell-Heinold & Co., blankets . 
Thorpe's Express, expressing . 
L. H. Truesdell & Co., lettering 
Underhill Hardware Co., hardware 
Samuel Ward Co., stationery . 
Western Electric Co., supplies 
Asahel Wheeler Co., enamel . 
H. G. White, wagon .... 

Amount carried forward 



$5,361 83 

4 99 
184 53 

1 50 
77 60 

5 75 
3 50 

34 00 

3 00 

17 10 

100 13 

5 25 

75 

14 70 

147 08 

10 50 
40 16 
50 08 

5 70 
90 00 

11 00 

1,213 9.1 

9 00 
3 08 

2 50 
2 10 

1 00 
26 45 

2 75 

2 00 

34 75 

70 

30 00 

3 66 
7 00 
5 10 
1 50 



76 65 
15 00 
37 66 
54 71 
22 60 

4 00 
3 05 

25 

9 75 

85 

15 80 

22 50 

1 00 

42 31 

5 75 
120 84 

22 15 
50 00 

$8,102 50 



7-i 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward .... 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co., hardware . 
Waite, Ranlet & Co., gutters, etc. 
I. B. Walker, frame for lamp . 
Wetherbee Brothers, service and auto 
hire 



Fire Department, board of horse 
Police Department, board of horse 



$8,102 50 
4 90 

2 50 

3 00 

12 00 


$8,124 90 
300 00 
131 72 



$8,556 62 



Electrical Department, Underground Construction, 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 

Sewers Construction account, amount transferred 

Balance to credit of account, 1910 .... 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid laborers .... 

Barbour, Stockwell Co., castings . 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight . 
Highland Coal Co., cement 
Wesley A. Maynard, advertising 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., labor and materials 
New York Insulated Wire Co., wire 
James Sugden, installing cable 



Highways Maintenance account, crushed 
stone 



$769 20 

102 00 

4 50 

4 60 

4 00 


i 

503 92 

2.213 31 

139 51 



53,741 04 
1 93 



$3,171 87 
1,500 00 

$4,671 87 
928 90 

$3,742 97 



$3,742 97 



Excess and Deficiency. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 

Printing and Stationery account, amount transferred 



Balances of 1909 accounts: — 

Assessors 

City Auditor 

City Clerk . . 

City Engineer 

City Messenger 

City Solicitor 

City Treasurer 

Clerk of Committees and Departments 
Contingent Fund . 

Amount carried forward 



$11,256 80 


1,500 00 


$9,756 80 


189 24 


20 57 


69 77 


30 86 


107 91 


70 31 


236 16 


62 15 


77 72 



$10,621 49 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



75 



Amount brought forward . 
Election Expenses: — 

City Clerk 

Commissioner of Public Buildings 

Pay of Election Officers . 

Registrars of Voters 
Electrical Department 
Executive Department 
Health Department, Medical Inspection in Public Schools 
Highways, Suppression of Elm-leaf Beetle 
Highways, Suppression of Gypsy and Brown-tail Moths 
Highways, Sprinkling Streets 

Interest 

Military Aid .... 
Printing and Stationery . 
Public Grounds 
Reduction of Funded Debt 
School Contingent . 
School Teachers' Salaries 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Sewers, Maintenance 

State Aid 

Support of Poor, City Home . 
Support of Poor, Miscellaneous 



Balance to credit of account, 1910 



$10,621 49 



631 92 


277 09 


62 00 


152 03 


129 88 


62 89 


72 55 


153 20 


2,176 15 
10 96 


14,069 20 
390 00 


514 77 


18 84 


10,519 34 
202 46 


1,793 65 

21 80 


29 60 


5 00 


464 92 


785 93 


$43,165 67 
10,708 05 



$32,457 62 



DEBIT. 



Balances of 1909 accounts: — 
Fire Department 
Health Department 
Health Department, Collection 

and Offal 
Health Department, Contagious 

Hospital 
Inspection of Buildings 

Police 

Public Buildings Maintenance: — 

City Buildings . 

Fire Department 

Janitors' Salaries 

Schoolhouses . 
Soldiers' Relief 
Street Lights .... 



of Ashes 
Disease 



$2,197 21 
3,082 92 


5,072 99 


709 12 

168 95 

8,161 84 


2,029 19 
1,081 78 

921 80 
6,447 55 

285 64 
2,298 63 



$32,457 62 



Executive Department. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Contingent Fund account, postage and stationery 



$4,000 00 
62 89 

$3,937 11 
28 45 



$3,965 56 



76 



ANNUAL EEFOKTS. 



DEBIT. 



(Expenditures.) 
W :ds, salary 



as 



Cash, paid John M. 

mayor 
Fred E. Warren, secretary to the mayor, 

disbursements .... 
American Express Co., expressing . 
Carter's Ink Co., ink 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directory . 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

Somerville Post-office, postage 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
Underwood Typewriter Co., supplies 
Sampson & Murdock Co., directory 
Samuel Ward Co., stationery . 





$2,500 00 


5 


1.300 00 




49 




30 




1 13 


u 


4 00 


n 


60 09 




46 40 




•27 25 




2 00 




6 00 




17 90 



$3,965 56 



Fire Department. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 . 

Writer Works Income account, amount appropriated 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 



Stock and labor billed other departments: — 
Electrical Department account, board of horses 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of City Treasurer, fines . $969 67 

Ralph M. Sturtevant, horses ... 75 00 



DEBIT. 

I Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid Tames R. Hopkins, salary as 

chief engineer .... 

Edward W. Ring, assistant engineer 
Permanent firemen and substitutes 
Callmen:— 

Steamer Co. No. 1 . 

Steamer Co. No. 2 

Steamer Co. No. 4 

Steamer Co. No. 6 

Hose Co. No. 2 

Hose Co. No. 3 

Hose Co. No. 5 

Hose Co. No. 7 

Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 

Hook and Ladder Co. No. 2 
T. H. Edwards, horseshoeing . 
David Keefe. horseshoeing 
George W. Ladd, horseshoeing 
George McDormand, horseshoeing 
Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing 
Pearl Street Shoeing Forge, horse 

shoeing 

Amount carried forward 



. 


1.456 00 


46,982 30 


1.347 32 


1,359 59 


1,604 86 


1,010 58 


1.196 30 


1,205 52 


941 12 


996 14 


1,835 10 


1.075 07 


303 80 


34 20 


119 05 


112 55 


52 % 


79 40 


$64,612 03 



00 00 
38,000 00 

2.1-7 21 

$78,197 21 
30000 



1,044 67 
$79,541 88 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT 1*1 



Amount brought forward . 
J. B. Rufer, horseshoeing 
J. H. Thompson, horseshoeing 
Harry Tobin, horseshoeing 
I. B. Walker, horseshoeing 
Margaret E. Calvert, washing 
Mrs. I. C. Jackson, washing 
A. M. Spike, washing 
Mrs. W. Loveland, washing 
Mary Shaw, washing . 
Mrs. E. F. Trefren, washing 
American Express Co., expressing . 
American La France Fire Engine Co 
valves ...... 

George A. Ayer, brushes . 

Ame & Co., food 

American Metal Polish Co., polish . 

F. W. Barry, Beale & Co., stationery 

D. J. Bennett, repairing harnesses . 
Charles E. Berry, repairing apparatus 
James M. Berry, surgical supplies . 
Boston Ice Co., ice . 

Braman, Dow & Co., wrenches 
H. A. Brownell, repairing harnesses 
W. S. Burbank & Co., sawdust 
Boston Coupling Co., repairing 
A. & E. Burton Co., dusters, etc. . 
Boston Chemical Co., insecticide . 
Cornelius Callahan Co., hose . 
C. C. C. Fire Hose Co., hose . 
John L. Crafts, aprons . 

E. J. Cambridge, stamps . 
Commonwealth Oil Co., soap . 

G. W. Cutter, insignia, etc. 

Crosby Steam Gage & Valve Co., re 
pairing 

F. E. Cheney Co., soap, etc. . 
Combination Ladder & Rhode Island 

Coupling Co., hose 

Cambridge Ice Co., ice . 

Jackson Caldwell & Co., comforters 

Joseph A. Cribby, services 

J. Albert Dow, services . 

Davenport-Brown Co., posts . 

J. A. Durell, hardware 

Eastern Drug Co., sulphuric acid . 

J. Wesley Edmonds & Son, metal polish 

Eureka Fire Hose Mfg. Co., hose . 

Samuel Eastman & Co., holders 

Firestone Tire & Rubber Co., re-setting 
tires 

F. E. Fitts Mfg. & Supply Co., waste 

Fred W. Farrar, repairing 

"Fire & Water Engineering," subscrip- 
tion 

Fresh Pond Ice Co., ice . 

Gilman Express Co., expressing 

Glines & Co., expressing . 

W. A. Greenough & Co., directories 

Amount carried forward 



$64,612 03 

446 25 

27 05 

55 90 

232 00 

194 31 

150 85 

22 49 

7 25 

40 77 
35 68 

3 40 

41 95 

35 50 

17 50 
9 00 

36 00 
104 05 
671 64 

7 25 

15 00 
14 03 
46 30 

3 00 

304 92 

39 00 

10 00 

159 00 

660 00 

•27 25 

5 00 

74 79 
63 00 

18 45 

8 02 

14S 92 

27 09 
25 00 

100 00 
68 00 

9 24 
73 

38 41 

33 m 

75 00 
50 00 

139 78 
80 45 

2 50 

3 00 

28 32 
8 97 

10 18 

16 00 

$69,063 88 



78 



ANNUAL HEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 

Charles T. Garland, use of horses 

George E. Grover, horse medicine 

Hale & Mayhew Co., repairing 

Henry S. Harris & Son, harnesses, etc. 

Henry S. Harris' Sons, horses 

Hill & Holt, oil, etc. 

R. Hull, oil . . . . 

S. D. Hicks & Son, repairing . 

William H. Hitchings, dentistry 

William S. Howe, repairing . 

S. F. Hayward & Co., hose patches 

Jim Hodder & Brother, blankets 

Hill & Hill, harness snaps 

O. L. Hill, use of autos . 

Industrial Department, . Massachusetts 
Commission for the Blind, mops 

J. A. Kiley, repairing 

F. W. Kimball, repairing . 

Knox & Morse Co., disinfectant 

O. F. Kress & Son, nozzle 

Lord & Webster, hay and straw 

J. Loring & Co., nutrotine 
. Leousi, Clonney & Co., sponges . 

J. G. Lesure, medicine 

H. W. Litchfield, milk 

Little, Brown & Co., Acts and Resolves 

Martin & Wood, repairing 

Mitchell Mfg. Co., badges 

C. W. H. Moulton & Co., repairing 
ladders 

D. McDonald, repairing . 
Joseph Moran, food . . 
Manhattan Rubber Mfg. Co., hose . 
Mathieson Alkali Works, soda 
John H. Melavin, nozzles, etc. 
Harry E. Morton, inspecting boilers 
A. M. Morton & Co., oiler 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service .... 
George W. Norton, soap . 
Fulton O'Brion, hay and straw 
H. H. Osgood & Co., squilgees 
R. G. Perkins, surgical supplies 
Proctor Brothers, oats, etc. 
W. E. Plumer & Co., oil . 
Perham's Express, expressing 
C. N. Perkins Co., brakes 
A. W. Phillips, gall cure . 
Henry D. Padelford, drugs 
John B. Rufer, repairing . 
F. W. Ramsey, M. D., services 
Wilbur P. Rice, lumber . 
O. S. Ryerson, sharpener 
R. F. Reichard Co., soap powder . 
Rufer & Creamer, use of horse 
Scovill Mfg. Co., buttons . 
Charles R. Simpson, veterinary services 
Somerville Journal Co., printing . 

Amount carried forward 



$69,063 88 

10 00 

3 15 

14 55 

109 40 
846 90 

2 70 

110 59 

17 27 

14 00 
2 94 
2 70 

109 94 
12 00 
55 50 

18 00 
319 50 

2 50 

28 00 

12 00 

2,048 43 

26 00 

46 18 
34 00 

40 
2 00 

1 60 
59 25 

40 20 

40 70 

12 40 

150 00 

47 04 
12 40 

25 00 
66 

163 75 

26 60 
1,196 99 

6 00 

5 65 
787 78 

7 95 
70 

220 00 

2 00 
2 50 

207 10 
10 00 

6 06 
75 00 

15 30 
6 00 

33 75 

97 70 

101 75 

$76,274 36 



APPENDTX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



79 



Amount brought forward . 
E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 
Sartwell, Heinold & Humphrey, soap 
Somerville Brush Co., sweepers 
R. M. Sturtevant, bay horse . 
Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., repair- 
ing 

William J. Thompson & Co., hay . 
Nathan Tufts & Sons, oats, etc. 
Charles L. Underhill, hardware 
Underhill Hardware Co., hardware 
Union Square Hotel, dinners . 
Harry Van Iderstine, insurance 
Welch, Dwyer & Grady, repairing . 
Welch & Hall Co., horse . 
Oliver Whyte Co., baskets 
William J. Wiley, linseed oil . 
Winter Hill Ice Co., ice . 
L. A. Wright, repairing 
West Disinfecting Co., soap and disin- 
fectant 

Charles A. G. Winther, mats . 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
Western Electric Co., motor . 
Winchester Tar Disinfectant Co., disin 
fectant ...... 

Fred H. Wentworth, badges . 



;76,274 36 
2 60 

4 80 
12 00 

300 00 

1 00 

193 56 

1,558 38 

5 75 
51 03 
23 00 

8 19 

196 00 

471 20 

47 25 

4 34 

12 00 

56 75 

82 00 

102 00 

18 67 

78 00 

12 00 

27 00 



$79,541 88 



Fire Department, Additional Apparatus, 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 

Sewers Construction account, amount transferred 

Balance to credit of account, 1910 



$59 55 

5,000 00 

$5,059 55 

5,059 55 



Funded Debt. 

CREDIT. 

Funded Debt, January 1, 1909 

Issue of 1909: — 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 3726 to 3845 
Sewer Loan Bonds Nos. 469 to 498 
Lowell Street Bridge Loan Bonds Nos. 
1 to 40 



DEBIT. 

Bonds matured in 1909: — 

City Loan Bond No. Reg. 114 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3519 to 3529 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3646 to 3652 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 1698 to 1703 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 1963 to 1976 

Amount carried forward 



$120,000 00 
30,000 00 

40,000 00 



$9,000 00 

11,000 00 

7,000 00 

6,000 00 

14,000 00 

$47,000 00 



$1,466,500 00 



190,000 00 
$1,656,500 00 



80 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
City Loan Bond No. Reg. 171 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2326 to 2330 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2466 to 2470 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2585 to 2591 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2716 to 2725 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2833 to 2839 
City Loan Bond No. Reg. 163 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3065 to 3073 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3226 to 3233 
City Loan Bond No. 3234 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3444 to 3451 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3160 to 3161 
Sewer Loan Bond No. Reg. 132 

.Sewer Loan Bond No. Reg. 19 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 439 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 6S 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 185 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 209 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 231 
Sewer Loan Bond No. Reg. 167 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 284 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 308 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 361 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 51 
Sewer Loan Bonds Nos. 123 to 125 
Paving Loan Bonds Nos. 81 to 85 
Water Loan Bonds Nos. 423 to 424 
Water Loan Bond No. 293 
Water Loan Bond No. Reg. 102 . 
Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan 
Bond No. Reer. 160 ... . 



Present Funded Debt, balance of account 



$47,000 00 
8,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
7,000 00 
10,000 00 
7,000 00 
9,000 
9,000 
8,000 
500 
8,000 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
3,000 
5,000 
2,000 
1,000 
3,000 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



1,000 00 



$153,500 00 
1,503,000 00 



$1,656,500 00 



Grade Crossings. 

CREDIT. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, amount received, 12 
per cent. 

City of Somerville, received from Commonwealth, 10 
per cent. 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of Boston & Maine Rail- 
road, decree, 60 per cent. 

West End Street Railway Co., Boston 
Elevated Railway Co. Lessee, decree, 
13 per cent 

Boston & Albany Railroad, New York 
Central & Hudson River Railroad, 
Lessee, decree, 5 per cent. 

Frank W. Kaan, 50 per cent, of bills not 
allowed . ' . 



Balance to debit of account, 1910 



$12,684 17 

12,893 34 

$25,577 51 



$43,912 79 




13,741 18 




5,285 07 




577 50 


63 516 54 


. 


9,376 54 



$98,470 59 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 81 

DEBIT. ' 

(Expenditures.) 

Balance from 1908 $32,879 52 

Cash, Fitchburg Railroad Co., Boston & 
Maine Railroad, Lessees, city's por- 
tion expense of construction 

Eugene H. Jones, photographs 

Frank W. Kaan, legal services as spe- 
cial counsel 

George F. Marshall, Trustee, settlement 
of claim for damage to estate 

Elizabeth J. O'Neil, settlement for tak- 
ing estate 

North Packing & Provision Co., settle- 
ment of claim for damage to estate, . 

Daniel O'Sullivan, settlement of claim 
for damage to estate .... 

William Phelan, taking estates 

Frank O. Squire, Fred F. Squire, and 
John P. Wyman, Trustees, settlement 
of claim . # 10,789 74 

John P. Squire & Co., settlement of 

claim for damage to estate . . . 36,000 00 

Francis Tufts, land damage . . . 100 00 



$2,323 20 
9 00 


1,184 09 


650 00 


3,035 04 


3,000 00 


2,500 00 
6,000 00 



$65,591 07 
$98,470 59 

Health Department. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 . . . . . $8,000 00 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . . 3,082 92 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, care of patients 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of J. E. Richardson, milk in 

spector's fees 

witness fees returned .... 
Herbert E. Bowman, milk inspector's 

fees 

William P. Mitchell, permits to keep 

swine 

witness fees returned 
City of Boston, care of patients 
City of Cambridge, care of patients 
City of Worcester, care of patients 
George W. Harding, care of patient 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Caleb A. Page, salary as agent, $1,500 00 

disbursements 3 10 

Sundry persons, burying dead animals, 103 75 



tients . 


$11,082 92 

28 57 


$321 00 
4 85 




32 35 




56 00 

1 30 

151 43 

34 00 

27 14 

5 00 


633 07 







$11,744 56 



Amount carried forward .... $1,606 85 



82 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Frank L. Morse, M. D., salary as medi 
cal inspector ..... 
visits to dangerous cases . 
Charles M. Berry, salary as inspector 
of animals and provisions 

disbursements .... 
Julius E. Richardson, salary as milk in 

spector 

disbursements • . . 
Herbert E. Bowman, salary as milk in 

spector 

M. W. White, M. D., salary as medical 

inspector of parochial school 
Adams Pharmacy, delivering cultures 
American Express Co., expressing . 
J. H. Atkinson, painting . 

D. J. Bennett, harness work, etc. . 
H. E. Bowman, medicines 

J. H. Brooks, cleaning blankets 

E. J. Cambridge, postage 
Cambridge Ice Co., ice . 
City of Salem, care of patients 
City of Worcester, care of patients 
Claude Curtis, delivering cultures . 

E. B. Carpenter, delivering cultures 
City of Boston, care of patients 
City of Newton, care of patients 
Chelsea Health Department, care o 

patients 

City of Cambridge, care of patients 
Edward Edwards, medicine and deliver 

ing cultures 

P. S. Eaton, delivering cultures 

W. S. Furbush, delivering cultures . 

C. F. Giles, provisions 

F. W. Gay, delivering cultures 
Thomas GrOom & Co., stationery . 
Gilman Brothers, sulphuric acid 

R. Hull, oil 

Percy A. Hall, delivering cultures . 
Hobbs & Warren Co., notices . 
Jaynes Drug Co., alcohol 
Martin & Wood, repairing generator 
Massachusetts State Sanato- 
rium, care of patients . . $17 71 
(Cash) 2 29 



City of Maiden, care of patients 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, care 
of patients . . . . . 

Melvin & Badger, drugs . . . . 

Theodore Metcalf Co., drugs . 

T. H. Mooers, plumbing .... 

Wesley A. Maynard, advertising 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 
Co., service . . . . 

North Packing & Provision Co., pro- 
visions 

Amount carried forward .... 



$1,606 85 

1,400 00 
543 80 

1,141 62 
1 90 

860 42 
61 69 

201 06 

100 00 

1 30 
10 25 
22 00 
78 20 

21 25 
5 00 

89 36 

22 72 
72 17 

2 86 

3 90 
10 

2,381 44 
153 99 

200 00 
1,001 43 

14 10 

70 

10 

110 00 

2 90 

76 10 

2 40 

60 

9 70 

2 24 

7 18 



24 00 



15 42 
22 30 


174 00 

80 

29 

16 05 

5 50 


90 69 


135 89 



$10,694 27 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S RErORT. 83 



Amount brought forward . 
North Reading State Sanatorium, care 

of patients 

David O'Keefe, shoeing . 

R. G. Perkins, medicine . 

A. P. Rockwood, board of horse . 

G. W. Ryan, provisions . 

Estate of J. E. Richardson, office rent 

Somerville Journal Co., printing 

SchiefYelin & Co., medicine 

R. M. Sturtevant, provisions . 

Somerville Hospital, care of patients 

F. H. Thomas Co., gas tubing . 

Harry Tobin, shoeing 

Thorpe's Express, expressing . 

Thorpe & Martin Co., stationery . 

Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 

L. A. Wright, tires, etc. . 

Whitney & Snow, hardware . 

Williams & Neiley, printing 

I. B. Walker, repairing wagon 

Samuel Ward Co., typewriter paper 



$10,694 27 



20 


00 


2 


00 


20 


00 


376 


80 


8 


00 


20 00 


151 


95 


65 


12 


48 


00 


181 


43 


11 


71 


30 


50 


2 13 


7 


85 


4 43 


28 


00 




97 


50 


00 


20 


10 


1 30 



$11,744 56 



Health Department, Collection of Ashes and Offal. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Stock and labor billed other departments 
Support of Poor, City Home account, offal 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry persons, offal 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid Edgar T. Mayhew, salary as 

superintendent .... 

Laborers ...... 

T. Allen, teaming .... 

D. J. Bennett, harnesses, etc. 

Jerry Buttimer, teaming '. 

Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co 

hose 

H. E. Bowman, medicine . 

Joseph Breck & Sons, tools 

J. A. Durell, hardware 

R. W. Doe, heater .... 

J. H. Edwards, horseshoeing . 

John Fisher & Co., offal tubs . 

Thomas Groom & Co., books . 

Hale & Mayhew Co., repairing wagons 

William T. Kilmartin, teaming 

George W. Ladd, horseshoeing 

Amount carried forward 



$1,400 


00 


46,539 


25 


217 


50 


809 


33 


5 00 


41 


50 


9 43 


35 


86 


69 


32 


21 


00 


45 


80 


20 


70 


38 


60 


192 


80 


322 50 


156 


15 



$50,000 00 
5,072 99 

$55,072 99 

287 25 

8,731 01 

$64,091 25 



$49,924 74 



6*4 



ANNUAL KEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Lord & Webster, straw . 
Frank W. Leavitt, ash carts 
T. E. Littleneld, shingles . 
George McDormand, horseshoeing 
J. B. Mayhew, canvas cover . 
Xew England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing 
Fulton O'Brion, grain 
Proctor Brothers, grain . 
John B. Rufer, repairing . 

0. B. Shepley, horses 

Charles R. Simpson, veterinary services 
Shepard, Clark & Co., ^sponges 
Walter H. Snow & Son, teaming . 
J. H. Thompson, teaming and board o: 

horse 

William J. Thompson Co., hay 
Nathan Tufts & Sons, oats, etc. 

1. B. Walker, horseshoeing 
Welch & Hall Co., horses 
L. A. Wright, repairing wagons 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
John Wilson, teaming 
Winter Hill Press, printing 



Highways Maintenance* account, use of 
teams 



$49,924 74 

1,752 SS 

450 00 

2 25 

276 50 

13 00 

47 05 

324 14 

2.570 52 

1.495 02 

171 35 

650 00 

140 75 

37 40 

20 

53S 93 

199 74 

1,843 89 

604 53 

928 96 

6$ 70 

59 45 

20 00 

4 75 

$62,144 55 

1,946 70 



$64,091 25 



Health Department, Contagious Disease Hospital. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, care of patients . 

Cash, received of Cit\- of Boston, care of 

patients . $^18 59 

City of Cambridge, care of patients . 655 71 

City of Chelsea, care of patients . 87 86 

City of Everett, care of patients . . 261 44 

City of Gloucester, care of patients . 113 57 

City of Lynn, care of patients ... 83 57 

City of Medford. care of patients . . 800 13 

City of Newton, care of patients . . 109 29 

City of Waltham, care of patients . . 92 14 

City of Woburn, care of patients . . 85 71 

Town of Amesbury. care of patients . 107 14 

Town of Arlington, care of patients . 232 13 

Town of Norwood, care of patients . 34 29 

Town of Revere, care of patients . . 25 71 

Town of Sutton, care of patients . . 109 29 

Town of Truro, care of patient? . 40 72 



Amounts carried forward 



$1,000 00 
709 12 

$1,709 12 

1,243 27 



$3,657 29 $2,952 39 






APPENDIX TO TKEASUliER AND COLLECTOR S EEPOET. 



85 



Amounts brought forward 
Town of Wakefield, care of patients 
Town of Walpole, care of patients . 
Town of Weston, care of patients . 
Town of Williamstown, care of patients, 
Sundry persons, care of patients . 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Nellie J. Van Cor, matron . 
incidental expenses 
Edith M. Grant, matron . 

incidental expenses 
Nurses and assistants 
Edward B. Bruce Co., whiskey 
C. J. Bailey & Co., rubber goods . 
Charles M. Berry, disbursements . 
Borden's Condensed Milk Co., milk 
Robert Burlen, book binding . 
Cambridge Ice Co., ice 
Empire Laundry Machine Co., ironing 

board and iron .... 
Farley, Harvey & Co., dry goods . 
J. B. Fuller & Co., alcohol and brandy 
Willis S. Furbush & Co., medicine . 
Mary E. Fales, room rent 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directory 
C. H. Goldthwaite, supplies 
J. Frank Gear, supplies 
Glines & Co., expressing . 
C. F. Hathaway & Son, bread 
Martin L. Hall Co., groceries 
H. P. Hood & Sons, milk 
F. J. Hopkins, fish 
I. N. Holman, sharpening 
J. W. Howard, plants 
E. Houston Co., games . 
Hobbs & Warren Co., blanks 
George T. Johnson & Co., toilet paper 
Jordan Marsh Co., dishes, etc. 
Jones, McDuffee & Stratton, dishes 
William Leavens & Co., furniture . 
Lewis Mfg. Co., gauze 
C. E. Morse, room rent . 
Miley Soap Co., soap 
Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 
National Biscuit Co., biscuits . 
New England Mfg. Co., butterine . 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service ..... 
National Thermometer Co., ther 

mometers, etc. .... 

S. S. Pierce Co., coffee 
Richardson, Wright & Co., cribs, etc. 
Randall-Faichney Co., thermometers 

Amount carried forward 



$3,G57 29 


$2,952 39 


6 43 




267 86 




98 57 




68 57 




1,439 72 






$5,538 44 





$804 84 

250 00 

64 00 

50 00 

4,431 96 

53 47 

14 73 

1 

3 

7 



00 
20 
50 



68 13 

20 00 
54 44 
19 00 
75 34 
13 18 

3 50 

4 00 
7 55 

13 79 

25 

42 48 

382 25 

310 92 

53 28 

3 55 

2 

1 

1 

5 



50 
25 
00 
50 
40 66 



20 
5 



11 

50 



13 55 

2 00 
17 25 

2 25 
13 28 
48 15 

64 74 



65 
65 



139 04 
3 50 



$8,490 83 



$7,141 94 



86 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward .... $7,141 94 

Somerville Post-office, postage . . 10 62 

E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware . 11 98 

C. L. Stevens, provisions .... 861 79 

Schieffelin & Co., medicine ... 21 48 

Somerville Journal Co., printing . . 16 55 

Leslie H. Steele, papers , 6 00 

George W. Steele, room rent ... 12 53 

Shepard, Norwell Co., gowns ... 41 40 

Mrs. F. O. J. Tarbox, room rent . . 65 00 

Henry A. Wheeler & Co., awnings . 39 75 

Wilson,, Larrabee & Co., towels, etc. . 69 49 

Samuel Ward Co., stationery .... 6 54 
Woman's Educational and Industrial 

Union, securing nurses .... 3 60 

$8,308 67 
Support of Poor, City Home account, 

produce and milk 182 16 



$8,490 83 



Health Department, Contagious Disease Hospital, 
Accounts for Collection. 

CREDIT. 

Cash, received from City of Cambridge, care . 

DEBIT. 

Balance from 1908 



$1,956 43 
$1,956 43 



Health Department, Medical Inspection in Public 
Schools. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



' DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid W. L. Bond, medical inspection 
Herbert Cholerton, medical inspection 
Edward J. Dailey, medical inspection 
Robert F. Gibson, medical inspection 
L. H. Raymond, medical inspection 
Francis Shaw, medical inspection . 
H. M. Stoodley, medical inspection 
Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 



$1,500 00 
72 55 

$1,427 45 



$200 00 




200 00 




200 00 




200 00 




200 00 




200 00 




200 00 




19 95 




7 50 






$1,427 45 





Highway Betterment Assessments. 

CREDIT. 

Cash, received of sundry persons . 
Highways Construction account, abatements 
Balance to debit of account, 1910 . 



$7,080 06 

67 79 

3,394 37 



$10,542 22 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 87 

DEBIT. 

Balance from 1908 $7,179 21 

Highways Construction account, assess- 
ments levied 3,363 01 

$10,542 22 

Highways, Construction. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1909 .... $80,000 00 
Highways, Shade Trees account, amount transferred . 33 38 

Stock and labor billed other departments: — 
Highways, Lowell Street Bridges account, 

paving blocks $275 37 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings ac- 
count, paving blocks .... 6,955 09 

7,230 46 



Charged to Highway Betterment Assess- 
ments account, assessments levied . $3,363 01 
less abatements 67 79 



3,295 22 



$90,559 06 
Balance from 1908 2,099 80 



$92,658 86 
Balance to credit of account, 1910 5,951 51 



i ; $86,707 35 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers $13,578 37 

Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia .... 8,492 09 
Coleman Brothers, crushed stone and 

use of roller . . . . 2,905 48 
Edwin O. Child, Register, recording 

documents 54 05 

Fred E. Ellis, trap rock .... 1,010 92 
Fred S. and A. D. Gove Corporation, on 

account of paving Washington street . 10,718 41 
George D. Haven, land taken and 

damages . . _ . . . . 1,349 02 

S. & R. J. Lombard, paving blocks . 2,316 65 

Massachusetts Broken Stone Co., stone . 821 48 

W. B. Mullen, car pebbles _ . . . 232 50 

Wesley A. Maynard, advertising . 16 50 

William J. McCarthy Co., stone . . 91 47 

Somerville Journal Co., advertising . 32 00 
Simpson Brothers Corporation, on ac- 
count of paving Highland avenue, and 

labor, teaming, etc 32,946 19 

Somerville Coal Co., discharging rock . 24 30 
Abbie E. Taylor, laying out Cleveland 

street, damages 500 00 

Tide Water Broken Stone Co., rock . 320 60 
Charles L. Upham, land damages, Heath 

street 75 00 

Winchester Stone Co.. stone . . 1,894 99 

Waltham Trap Rock Co., stone . . 586 75 

. ' $77,966 77 



Amount carried forward .... $77,966 77 



88 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward .... 
City Engineer account, inspection 
Highway Betterment Assessments account, 

assessment 

Highways Maintenance account, use of city 

teams, etc. 

Sewers Maintenance account, changing 

grade of catch basins .... 
Sidewalks Maintenance account, bricks 
Taxes account, taxes on ledge property, 

1905 and 1906 . • 

Water Maintenance account, stock, labor, 

etc 



$77,966 77 
200 00 


106 40 


7,610 95 


528 69 
44 88 


97 25 


152 41 



$86,707 35 



Highways Construction, Lowell Street Bridges. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1909 . 
Balance to credit of account, 1910 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers 

F. C. Aver, lumber . 

H. S. Angus & Son, raising houses 

John H. Adcock, plumbing 

S. F. Bowser & Co., repairs . 

John P. Burke, mason work 

Barbour, Stockwell Co., frame and grate 

W. F. Griffin, plumbing . 

Eugene H. Jones, photographs 

Frank Q. Johnson, furnace work 

T. E. Littlefield, lumber . 

P. Lacy, mason work 

S. & R. J. Lombard, edgestones 

Charles F. Mills, carpentering 

Edward L. McLean, dirt . 

New England Brick Co., bricks 

Somerville Journal Co., advertising 

Simpson Brothers Corporation, hauling 

rilling 

Somerville Furnace & Stove Co., fur 

nace work 

S. J. Sands, plumbing, etc. 
James Tevlin, labor, etc. . 
Waldo Brothers, cement . 



City Engineer account, services . 
Highway Construction account, labor . 
Highways Maintenance account, use of city 

teams 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings 

account, paving blocks .... 
Sewers Maintenance account, changing 

grade, etc. 



$2,231 26 


526 01 


460 00 


66 82 


1 90 


1,623 00 


2 62 


10 80 


16 50 


79 18 


3 36 


600 00 


29 69 


445 97 


358 00 


10 80 


13 00 



354 20 



57 66 
290 00 

so 5.;. 

15 88 


$7,277 15 
125 00 
275 37 


338 57 


9 50 


407 28 



$40,000 00 

31,567 13 

$8,432 87 



$8,432 87 



APPENDIX TO TREASURES AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 89 

Highways, Maintenance. 



CREDIT. 



Balance from 190S $5,613 98 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts: — 

Street Railway Tax $45,778 32 

Boston Elevated Railway Tax . . 9,236 99 

55,015 31 



$60,629 29 
Amount transferred to Sidewalks Maintenance account . 1,082 19 



$59,547 10 
Balance to credit of account, 1910 12,341 59 



Stock and labor billed other departments: — 

Electrical Department, Underground Con- 
struction account, crushed stone . . $1 93 

Health, Collection of Ashes and Offal ac- 
count, teams 1,946 70 

Highways Construction account, use of city 

teams, etc 7,610 95 

Highways Construction, Lowell Street 

Bridges account, use of city teams . 338 57 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings ac- 
count, use of city teams . . . 1,425 44 

Highways, Sprinkling Streets account, use 

of city teams 2,612 99 

Highways, Suppression of Elm Leaf Beetle 

account, use of city teams ... 58 80 

Highways, Suppression of Gypsy and 
Brown Tail Moths account, use of city 
teams 123 20 

Public Buildings Maintenance, City Build- 
ings account, coal, etc 14 78 

Public Grounds account, stock and labor . 309 52 

Public Library Construction, West Somer- 
ville Branch account, constructing 
driveway 44 59 

Sewers Construction account, repairing 

sidewalk 104 30 

Sewers Maintenance account, gravel . 6 80 

Sidewalks Construction account, use of city 

teams 3,612 94 

Sidewalks Maintenance account, use of city 
teams 

Soldiers' Monument account, teaming 

Water Maintenance account, labor and 
stone 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry persons, construct- 
ing driveways 

Cambridge Gas Light Co., labor . 
Boston Elevated Railway Co., labor 
Waldo Brothers, bags .... 
F. R. Mathison, loam .... 



$47,205 51 



172 24 

6 55 

27 73 


$302 98 

1,207 95 

248 68 

227 05 

142 50 



18,418 03 



Amounts carried forward .... $2,129 16 $65,623 54 



90 



ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 



Amounts brought forward .... 
F. T. Ley, crushed stone .... 
Simpson Brothers Corporation, labor . 
Somerville Y. M. C. A., crushed stone, 

etc 

Sundry persons, labor, etc. 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Asa B. Prichard, salary as street 

commisioner 

disbursements 

Laborers . . . ' . $45,547 17 

(Cash) .... 63 00 



American Broom Co., brooms 
American Express Co., expressing . 
Ashton Valve Co., repairing valves 

F. C. Ayer, lumber .... 
. Abbot-Downing Co., chain 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight . 

Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia . 

J. A. Bremner, frames and glass . 

Jerry Buttimer, stone 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co., repairing 
rollers ...... 

Charles E. Berry, labor on stone 
crusher 

H. E. Bowman, medicine . 

Boulevard Auto Co., use of car 

Braman, Dow & Co., supplies . 

Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co 
hose 

Boston Grease Co., lubricator . 

Boston Steam Roller Co., grease . 

Chandler & Farquhar Co., supplies 

Charles A. Claflin Co., belt lacings, etc. 

Richard A. Crocker, settlement for in- 
juries 

G. S. Cheney Co., medicine 
T. A. Cunningham, brush . 
Cling Surface Co., cling surface 
Catherine Cunningham, settlement o 

claim 

Davenport-Brown Co., lumber 

Dyar Supply Co., wagon . 

R. W. Doe, iron rivets, etc. 

Thomas Damery, disbursements 

Dodge & Haley Co., bolts, etc. 

Edson Mfg. Co., chains for sweeper 

J. H. Edwards, setting shoe . 

J. Hatfield Estey, sand 

J. H. Fannon, repairing crossings . 

Walter W. Field, repairing machine 

etc 

Amount carried forward 



52,129 16 
142 20 

1 70 

53 45 
14 63 



$65,623 54 



$2,000 00 
50 



45,484 17 
143 90 

2 40 
4 60 

253 59 

7 00 

4 43 

1,023 28 

3 00 
27 08 

447 46 



23 31 


7 85 


15 00 


21 48 


13 40 


17 10 


3 50 


22 94 


105 82 


25 00 


23 54 


2 25 


7 00 


150 00 


8 54 


170 00 


11 95 


10 00 


78 10 


13 00 


25 


129 00 


16 98 


61 23 



2,341 14 

$67,964 68 



$50,338 65 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



91 



Amount brought forward . 
F. C. Fuller & Co., white lead . 
Glincs & Co., expressing . 
Thomas Groom & Co., books . 
Good Roads Machinery Co., snow plow 

etc. ....... 

Goodwin & Rimbach, dinners . 

Mary G. Geary, settlement for injury 

B. B. Holton, gravel and sand . 

E. J. Hervey Co., dynamite 

Thomas Hollis Co., anodyne . 

Alfred O. Heustis, hames fasteners 

J. W. Howard, tree and flowers 

J. F. Hanley, horse collars 

William Houley, settlement for injury 

William H. Hitchings, veterinary ser 

vices 

Ingersoll-Sargent Drill Co., bolts, etc. 

A. W. Isele & Son, hammers . 

H. W. Johns-Manville Co., roofing 

William T. Kilmartin, sand, etc. 

J. A. Kiley, bolt .... 

T. E. Littlefield, lumber . 

Lord & Webster, hay and straw 

A. C. Libby & Sons, stationery 

P. J. Lennon, stone . 

George W. Ladd, horseshoeing 

Estate of Charles Linehan, rent of land 

S. & R. J. Lombard, circles 

Martin & Wood, sharpening saws 

Morgan & Bond, saddlery supplies 

Massachusetts Broken Stone Co., stone 

D. J. Moynahan, board of horse 

George F. McKenna & Son, horses 

W. B. Mullen, sand . 

Miller & Co., chain fall . 

George McDormand, horseshoeing 

Medford Street Market, lard . 

Alfred E. Mann, repairing wagon 

Massachusetts Commission for the 

Blind, push brooms 
Wesley A. Maynard, advertising 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service .... 
New England Oil Co., oil 
North Packing & Provision Co., lard 
New England Towel Supply Co., wash 

ing towels .... 

Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing 
J. O'Keefe, gravel, etc. 
Fulton O'Brion, feed, etc. 
Proctor Brothers Grain Co., grain 
Perrin, Seamans Co., plow, etc. 
S. D. Pierce, stone . 
Perkins Wood Working Co., oak 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
John A. Pendergast, push brooms 
John M. Riley, sand . 
Roberts Iron Works Co., grate 

Amount carried forward 



$50,338 05 
30 00 
13 80 
37 75 

59 75 

23 00 

175 00 

10 00 

183 48 

4 00 

1 

5 

5 



00 
90 
00 
600 00 



101 
3 



00 
55 



27 00 

32 50 

51 27 

10 

2 00 

1,945 50 

40 75 

35 85 

6 10 
75 00 

109 98 

7 25 
592 99 

58 70 

213 33 

600 00 

1,034 96 

32 60 

4 65 

7 30 

46 50 

9 50 

1 87 

106 20 
262 24 

1 80 

2 25 

166 25 

101 25 

2,173 02 

1,430 67 

80 26 

2 76 

64 03 

49 88 

9 25 

121 00 

6 68 



$61,105 12 



92 



ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
John B. Rufer, clipping 
Fred Schumacher, stone . 
Suffolk Hide Co., salt 
Shea Lubricator Co., lubricator 
J. H. Strain, repairing scraper 
George H. Sampson Co., packing rings 
E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 
Sherburne & Co., shovels, etc. 
W. A. Sanborn & Co., bricks . 
Sampson Draught Spring Co., springs 
Walter H. Snow, catering 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
J. H. Shannon, stone 
W. A. Smith, tools, etc. . 
Sexton Car Co., cans and barrels 
T. A. Sallaway, lamp black and oil 
Somerville Post-office, postage 
Albion Towle, board of horse 
William Thumith, loam 
Nathan Tufts & Sons, grain 
Thorpe's Express, expressing 
Valvoline Oil Co., oil 
Underhill Hardware Co., hardware 
A. M. Wood Co., iron and nails 
Wellington- Wild Coal Co., fuel 
Whitney & Snow, paint stock, etc. 
I. B. Walker, repairing carts . 
William J. Wiley, repairing 
L. A. Wright, repairing 
Walworth Mfg. Co., supplies . 
Mary E. Walsh, settlement of claim 
Asahel Wheeler & Co., gold leaf 
Waldo Brothers, cement . 
City of Waltham, taxes 
Waltham Trap Rock Co., stone 



Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings ac- 
count, paving blocks 
Sidewalks Construction account, lumber 
Sidewalks Maintenance account, bricks 
Water Maintenance account, stock and 
labor 



$61,105 12 



4 85 


39 10 


7 50 


18 90 


34 60 


2 20 


170 33 


311 56 


38 43 


5 00 


10 49 


32 10 


13 65 


• 59 86 


54 00 


8 40 


18 62 


75 00 


13 50 


2,271 88 


1 00 


127 14 


174 49 


268 26 


1,057 37 


83 00 


136 57 


13 70 


43 45 


4 17 


6 00 


7 50 


1,497 38 


106 80 


30 69 


$67,852 61 


37 81 


10 33 


40 09 


23 84 



$67,964 68 



Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1909 . 
Sewers Construction account, amount transferred 



Stock and labor billed other departments: — 
Highways Maintenance account, paving 

blocks 

Highways Construction, Lowell Street 
Bridges account, paving blocks 



$37 81 
9 50 



$^,000 00 
7,670 95 

$15,670 95 



47 31 



$15,718 26 



ArrENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



33 



DEBIT. 



(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers 

Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia . 

S. & R. J. Lombard, flagging, etc. 

W. A. Sanborn & Co., paving bricks 



Highways Construction account, paving 
blocks 

Highways Maintenance account, use of city 
teams, etc. ...... 



$5,130 19 

203 85 

1,983 72 

10 97 

$7,337 73 

6,955 09 

1,425 44 



$15,718 26 



Highways, Shade Trees. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 

Highways Construction account, amount transferred 



3 38 
33 38 



$30 00 


70 00 


29 00 


59 47 



Highways, Sprinkling Streets. 

CREDIT. 

Taxes, assessments levied ..... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts : — 
Cash, received of abutters 
Sundry persons, insuring . 
Barrett Mfg. Co., barrels . 
Gulf Refining Co., barrels returned 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers 

Thomas Allen, sprinkling . 
Cornelius R. Bowlby, sprinkling 
Fred R. Brown, sprinkling 
Frank Buttimer, sprinkling 
James W. Buckley, sprinkling . 
George E. Carr, sprinkling . 
Daniel Collins, sprinkling 
Timothy F. Crimmings, sprinkling 
J. F. Elkins Co., sprinkling 
James H. Fannon, sprinkling . 
Charles T. Garland, sprinkling 
William A. Hall, sprinkling . 
J. F. Hause & Co., sprinkling . 
Jameson Bros., sprinkling 
Howard Lowell & Son, sprinkling 
J. A. Marsh Coal Co., sprinkling 
Annie M. McAvoy, sprinkling 
Joseph J. Manning, sprinkling 

Amount carried forward 



$5,348 55 


556 00 


200 32 


150 00 


150 


00 


540 00 


540 


00 


564 


00 


108 


00 


540 


00 


233 


93 


540 


00 


578 00 


540 


00 


540 


00 


566 


00 


570 00 


540 00. 


540 


00 



$30,677 25 
10 96 

$30,666 29 



188 47 



$30,854 76 



$13,344 80 



94 



AtfXTTAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Michael J. McLaughlin, sprinkling 
Mark W. Patten, sprinkling 
George Patten, sprinkling 
Albion M. Prescott, sprinkling 
Albert P. Rockwood, sprinkling 
Thomas F. Reardon, sprinkling 
J. B. Rufer & Co., sprinkling 
David M. Smith, sprinkling 
James Simpson, sprinkling 
George Stevenson,- sprinkling 
Suburban Coal Co., sprinkling 
Mary J. Shean, sprinkling 
Ralph M. Sturtevant, sprinkling 
R. Allen Sturtevant, sprinkling 
J. Herbert Thompson, sprinkling 
John Wilson, sprinkling . 
Thomas Walsh, sprinkling 
Delia M. Wilson, sprinkling 
Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia . 
Josephine M. Briggs, clerical services 
Dodge-Haley Co., iron 
W. J. Emerson, rubber boots . 
Gulf Refining Co., asfaltoid emulsion 
Good Roads Improvement Co., asphal 

toilene 

Florence Ham, clerical services 
Headley Good Roads Co., dust preven 

tive , 

Indian Refining Co., asphalt . 
Florence R. Kenneson, clerical services 
Margaret E. Lawler, excess paid for 

1903-1906 

James H. Maguire Co., lard 

City of Medford, sprinkling . 

J. L. & H. K. Potter, repairing carts 

Somerville Journal Co., printing 

Joseph Palmer, repairing springs . 

Charles S. Robertson, insurance . 

E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 

A. M. Wood Co., steel ... 

Walworth Mfg. Co., nipples, etc. . 

I. B. Walker, repairing carts, etc. . 

Samuel Ward Co., book . 



Highways Maintenance account, use of 
city teams 

Water Maintenance account, maintenance 
of water posts . . • . 



$13,344 80 

519 68 

572 00 

81 68 

643 6S 

540 00 

580 00 

540 00 

572 00 

540 00 

566 00 

562 00 

550 07 

576 00 

540 00 

90 00 

540 00 

372 00 

32 00 

3,669 53 

14 67 

31 31 

21 00 

263 20 

270 00 
20 00 

1,270 50 

248 45 

90 67 

5 92 

1 76 

66 43 

59 64 

12 37 

14 50 

90 00 

7 55 

1 48 

7 51 

3 50 

17 25 

$27,949 15 

2,612 99 

292 62 






$30,854 76 



Highways, Suppression of Elm-Leaf Beetle. 



CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



$1,000 00 
153 20 



$846 80 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



95 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers 

Frost Insecticide Co., arsenate of lead . 
Walsh Bros., spraying trees 



Highways Maintenance account, use of city 
teams 



$670 50 

112 50 

5 00 



$788 00 
58 80 



Highways, Suppression of Gypsy and Brown=Tail Moths. 



$84G 80 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 
Taxes, assessments levied 



Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of New England Oil Co., barrel . 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid laborers 

T. Allen, cement, etc. 
Barrett Mfg. Co., creosote 
T. A. Cunningham, brushes 
Fellows & Co., ladders, poles, etc. 
Florence Ham, clerical services 
Martin & Wood, springs 
W. E. Plumer & Co., supplies 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
Underhill Hardware Co., supplies 
Walsh Bros., spraying trees . 
Samuel Ward Co., book . 



Highways Maintenance account, use of 
teams 



Inspection of Buildings. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of Walter T. Littlefield, plumbers' licenses, 



$3,800 00 
1,649 41 

$5,449 41 
2,176 15 

$3,273 26 

1 50 

$3,274 76 





$2,860 58 






9 00 






8 64 






1 50 






48 25 






53 34 






8 00 






15 20 






122 75 






2 30 






8 50 






13 50 


1 




$3,151 56 




e o\ 


123 20 


$3,274 76 







$4,450 00 
168 95 

$4,618 95 

41 25 



$4,660 20 



96 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Walter T. Littlefield, salary as 

commissioner of public buildings 
William F. Barker, deputy commissioner 

of public buildings 
George H. Galpin, assistant to commis 

sioner of public buildings 
Duncan C. Greene, inspector of plumb 

ing . . ... 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directory 
Glines & Co., expressing 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 
W. J. Hanson, oil ... 
Alexander H. Irvin, paper fasteners 
Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 
B. L. Makepeace, supplies 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service . . 
Samuel Ward Co., stationery 
Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., repairs 

and supplies 

Somerville Journal Co., supplies 

S. M. Spencer Mfg. Co., rubber stamp 

F. S. Webster Co., supplies 

Samuel Ward Co., supplies 

Yawman Erbe Mfg. Co., cards, etc. 



$2,000 00 


r 

336 07 


- 

. 800 00 


1,200 00 


4 00 


15 


6 26 


50 


30 


3 00 


9 80 
u 


n 

125 55 


11 40 


8 25 


98 90 


s 53 


1 05 


5 73 


48 71 



$4,660 20 



Interest. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry persons . 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Coupons maturing April 1, 1909 . $5,545 00 
Coupons maturing July 1, 1909 . 16,057 50 
Coupons maturing October 1, 

1909 8,315 00 

Coupons maturing January 1, 1910, 14,312 50 



Cash, paid interest on Registered 
Bonds: — 

Interest due April 1, 1909 . $3,487 50 

Interest due July 1, 1909 . 2,085 00 

Interest due October 1, 1909 3,447 50 

Interest due January 1, 1910 1,732 50 



$44,230 00 



Amount carried forward 



10,752 50 

$54,982 50 



$75,000 00 
14,069 20 

$60,930 80 

12,395 32 

$73,326 12 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 97 

$54,982 50 



Amount brought forward . 
On Temporary Loans: — 
Note No. 6S6, 12 months 

$25,000 .... 
Note No. 688, 6 months 

$25,000 .... 
Note No. 687, 6 months 

$50,000 .... 
Notes Nos. 691-2-3, 251 days 

$150,000 .... 
Notes Nos. 694 to 697, 236 

days, $100,000 
Notes Nos. 698 to 705, 310 

days, $150,000 
Note No. 706, 6 months 

$25,000 .... 
Note No. 687, six months 

$50,000 .... 
Notes Nos. 707 to 722, 261 

days, $200,000 



$937 50 

468 75 

962 50 

3,157 92 

1,966 67 

4,178 00 

375 00 

962 50 

5,334 78 



$18,343 62 



Metered Water Charges. 

CREDIT. 

Cash, received of sundry water takers 
Balance to debit of account, 1910 



$24,971 96 
2 50 



DEBIT. 



Balance from 1908 . 

Last quarter, 1909, uncollected 



$24,974 46 
15,664 46 



riilltary Aid. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, amount charged 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid sundry persons as per pay-rolls . 

Overlay and Abatement. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 

Taxes, amount of overlay from assessors' warrant 
Amount of assessors' supplementary warrants, 1909 



$73,326 12 



$24,974 46 
15,664 46 

$40,638 92 
$40,638 92 



$900 00 
390 00 



$510 00 
510 00 



Amount carried forward 



$1,020 00 
$1,020 00 



$11,563 04 

10,304 53 

-4,356 48 

$26,224 05 

$26,224 05 



98 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward $26,224 05 

Balance to credit of account, 1910 6^882 29 

$19,341 76 

Taxes, to correct warrant 248 00 

Taxes, moth tax re-assessed 2 00 



DEBIT. 



Taxes, amount of abatements . . . $19,538 42 
Cash, paid sundry persons, money re- 
funded 53 34 



$19,591 76 



$19,591 76 



Overplus on Tax Sales. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 $118 13 

DEBIT. 

Balance to credit of account, 1910 $118 13 



Police. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 $45,000 00 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . . 8,161 84 



Receipts: — 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, corpora- 
tion tax, 1908 $5,418 15 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, corpora- . 

tion tax, 1909 .... . 26,357 24 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

national bank tax, 1909 . $3,481 19 

less tax of 1908 ... 71 90 

3,409 29 



$53,161 84 



35,184 68 

Stock and labor billed other departments: — 

Electrical Department, hay and grain 131 72 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of John R. Fairbairn, Master 

of House of Correction, fines . . $281 00 

Herbert A. Chapin, Clerk of the Courts, 

fines 

Sundry persons, cloth for uniforms 
Boston & Maine Railroad Corporation, 

police service 

John B. Rufer, old wagon 

John J. McCarthy, junk .... 

Helen B. Choate, police services 

--•--'-■ $91,690 53 



2,040 00 
382 44 




480 00 

10 00 

9 85 

9 00 


3,212 29 





APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR^ RErORT. 



99 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Charles A. Kendall, chief 
Robert R. Perry, captain . 
Lieutenants: — 

Dennis Kelley 

Eugene A. Carter . 

Charles E. Woodman 
Sergeants: — 

Edward McGarr 

George H. Carleton 

James M. Harmon . 

John A. Ray . 
Inspector: — 

Thomas Damery 
Patrolmen (salaries and extra duties) : — 

Charles W. Allen . 

Louis F. Arnold 

Louis J. Belzarini . 

Robert T. Blair 

David A. Bolton 

Joseph J. Burns 

Samuel Burns 

Edward M. Carter 

Jotham Chisholm . 

Claude L. Crossman 

John J. Cummings . 

John A. Dadmun . 

William J. Davidson 

Edward M. Davies . 

Robert D. Dewar . 

Ezra A. Dodge 

Patrick J. Doolin 

Dennis Downey 

Elmer E. Drew 

Joseph A. Dwyer 

Augustine J. Fitzpatrick 

Harvey R. Fuller . 

Ernest S. Goff 

Frederick H. Googins 

Myron S. Gott 

Frank H. Graves . 

Walter L. Groves . 

Theodore E. Heron 

Herbert Hilton 

Edward J. Hopkins 

Frank C. Hopkins . 

Ernest Howard 

Hudson M. Howe . 

Charles S. Johnston 

William H. Johnston 

Frederick G. Jones 

Edmund J. Keane . 

Michael T. Kennedy 

William G. Kenney 

Sanford S. Lewis . 

James M. Lynch 

Bernard McCabe 

Amount carried forward 



$1,598 08 


1,500 00 


1,350 00 


1,350 00 


1,350 00 


1,200 00 


1,200 00 


1,200 00 


1,200 00 


1,150 00 


1,041 50 


1,107 00 


1,076 75 


1,093 25 


1,110 75 


987 75 


1,115 75 


1,097 00 


1,108 25 


1,107 00 


1,104 75 


1,108 25 


1,108 25 


1,109 50 


842 50 


1,093 25 


985 25 


1,103 25 


1,083 00 


937 25 


848 00 


1,105 75 


951 00 


1,104 50 


1,109 50 


1,110 75 


981 50 


1,092 00 


1,095 75 


984 00 


1,103 25 


1,104 50 


1,112 75 


1,115 75 


1,108 25 


990 25 


1,118 25 


1,102 00 


987 75 


1,098 25 


1,114 50 


955 00 



$57,711 58 



100 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 






$57,711 58 


Patrick McGrath . 






844 25 


Thomas F. McNamara 






1,113 25 


Peter Moore . 






930 00 


Dennis G. Mulqueeney 






1,001 50 


Dennis Neylon 






1,122 00 


Francis A. Perkins 






963 00 


George A. C. Peters 






1,116 00 


James E. Phillips 






1,108 25 


Walter Reed . 






1,080 00 


Charles W. Reick . * . 






1,015 75 


George L. Rice 






1,105 75 


Martin Sharry 






1,118 25 


Daniel G. Simons 






1,123 25 


• Lemuel J. Simons . 






1,100 75 


Jacob W. Skinner . 






1,119 50 


George L. Smith 






1,092 00 


Clyde W. Steeves . 






930 00 


Charles W. Stevens 






1,114 50 


Henry A. Sudbey . 






1,124 50 


William E. Taylor . 






908 75 


Thomas P. Walsh . 






898 75 


Eugene A. Woodsum 






1,103 25 


Harry C. Young 






922 50 


Drivers: — 








Edward E. Ware 






910 00 


Martin E. Driscoll . 






819 00 


John J. Scannell 






819 00 


James F. Flynn 






94 50 


. Retired list (half pay) : — 






- 


Melville C. Parkhurst 






1,000 00 


George W. Bean . 






546 00 


Albion L. Staples . 






546 00 


John E. Fuller 






546 00 


James J. Pollard 






546 00 


Ira S. Carleton 






546 00 


Special patrolmen: — 








Robert C. Brown . 






18 75 


Colby Hawes . 






32 50 


Frank O. Downer . 






6 25 


Albert C. Hawes 






2 50 


Officers at polling places 




80 00 


Minnie F. Woodland, matron . 




183 25 


American Towel Supply Co., towels 


sup 




plied 




50 50 


Allen Brothers, supplies . 




9 95 


American Express Co., expressing 




2 75 


L. H. Brown, carriage hire 




32 00 


Henry Barrett, photographs . 




38 00 


D. J. Bennett, harness repairs 




29 25 


David Bruce, stop watch . 




13 00 


Bostonian Laundry, washing . 




6 60 


H. A. Brownell, blanket . 




150 


S. W. Bennett, repairing police numbers 


2 10 


Justin J. Bradshaw & Co., scrap book 


2 25 


Eugene A. Carter, disbursements . 


115 12 


Henry F. Curtis, M. D., services 


2 00 


B. W. Carpenter, saddle h 


orse 

i 




26 00 



Amount carried forward 



$88,694 10 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 101 



Amount brought forward .... $88,694 10 

Charles S. Clark, dictionary and ex- 
press 

Clarendon Stable, boarding and supplies 

Thomas Damery, disbursements 

George E. Damon Co., year book . 

Elmer E. Drew, disbursements 

J. W. Denehy & Co., copy of liquor laws 

B. F. Freeman, photographs . 

Fred W. Farrar, repairs . 

Fresh Pond Ice Co., ice . 

Fitzherbert & Wing, newspapers . 

W. A. Greenough & Co., directory . 

Glines & Co., expressing . 

Globe-Wernicke Co., case and cards 

Gilman Express Co., expressing 

F. W. Hopkins, disbursements 

Hobbs & Warren Co., stationery 

James Harper & Co., furniture and re- 
pairs 

Henry S. Harris & Son, harness 

Edward J. Hopkins, disbursements 

James M. Harmon, disbursements . 

Iver Johnson Sporting Goods Co., hand 
cuffs and supplies .... 

M. Linsky & Brothers, shoulder straps 
etc. ....... 

Little, Brown & Co., law books 

Lord & Webster, hay and grain 

George W. Ladd, shoeing 

Sanford S. Lewis, disbursements 

Martin & Wood, fittings . 

Mary McEachern, meals for prisoners 

Raphael Masstrangialo, police trim 
mings, etc. 

Moseley Safe Co., work on safe 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 
Co., service 

Fulton O'Brion, hay, straw, etc. 

Proctor Brothers, grain . 

A. P. Rockwood, storage, etc. 

Ira L. Roberts, horseshoeing . 

F. W." Ramsey, M. D., medical services 

Robart-Carleton Co., repairs . 

John B. Rufer, ambulance repairs . 

Somerville Journal Co., printing 

Scoville Mfg. Co., buttons 

R. C. Small & Co., wagon repairs . 

R. M. Sturtevant, horse and supplies 

Parke Snow, bedding .... 

Charles R. Simpson, veterinary services, 

The Frank Shepard Co., Massachusetts 
citations 

Malcolm E. Sturtevant, commitments 

Somerville Post-office, postage 

Idella A. Taylor, washing . 

Thorpe's Express, expressing 

William J. Thompson & Co., hay 

Nathan Tufts & Sons, grain 

Underwood Typewriter Co., ribbons 

' j 

Amount carried forward .... $91,310 50 



4 30 


160 25 


114 82 


2 00 


2 15 


2 50 


4 00 


2 25 


32 05 


7 75 


12 00 


1 35 


24 60 


50 


96 11 


51 90 


28 40 


85 00 


1 95 


93 


57 23 


108 08 


4 50 


117 44 


22 00 


20 90 


6 45 


31 00 


63 60 


2 50 


213 18 


102 46 


86 20 


41 00 


121 25 


4 00 


1 25 


206 10 


135 45 


33 75 


19 50 


345 70 


32 15 


8 00 


3 00 


30 41 


10 00 


32 40 


1 55 


16 90 


101 64 


2 00 



102 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward .... 

M. L. Vinal, envelopes .... 

Whitney & Snow, supplies 

Warrenton Woolen Co., cloth . 

M. W. White, M. D., professional ser- 
vices 

H. A. Winship, saddle, etc. 

Charles Waugh & Co., ambulance and 
wagon repairs 



Printing and Stationery (Public Documents and 
Stationery for the Board of Aldermen). 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 $750 00 

Excess and Deficiency account, amount transferred . . 1,500 00 



$91,310 50 

1 20 

27 92 

247 22 




2 00 

48 75 




52 94 


$91,690 53 





$2,250 00 



Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . . 514 77 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid John F. Biggs & Co., registers . $175 00 
Wesley A. Maynard, printing and adver- 
tising 

Somerville Post-office, postage 
Somerville Evening Sun, advertising 
Somerville Journal Co., printing annual 

reports, etc 

H. C. Whitcomb & Co., electros 



$1,735 23 



111 75 

39 00 
5 00 


1,399 48 
5 00 



$1,735 23 



Property and Debt Balance. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 $3,835,583 08 

Public Property, property acquired in 1909 . . . 58,746 06 

Funded Debt, bonds matured 153,500 00 



DEBIT. 

Funded Debt, issue of 1909 .... $190,000 00 
Balance to credit of account, 1910 . . 3,857,829 14 



$4,047,829 14 
$4,047,829 14 



Public Buildings Construction, Addition to Con- 
tagious Disease Hospital. 

CREDIT. 

Public Buildings Construction, Building Public Buildings 

account, amount transferred $7,000 00 

Balance to credit of account, 1910 2,937 60 



$4,062 40 



APPENDIX TO TliEASUKER AND COLLECTORS HEPOKT. 103 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid D. A. Carr, on account of con- 
tract 

B. L. Makepeace, blue prints . 
J. E. L. McLean, on account of con- 
tract 

Slade & Crawford, copying 

Whitten & Jackson, payment on account, 



Public Buildings Construction, Bath House Addition. 

CREDIT. 

Public Buildings Construction, Building Public Buildings 
account, amount transferred 

Public Buildings Construction, Building Public Buildings 
account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 



$150 00 
5 15 




3,600 00 

7 25 

300 00 


$4,062 40 





Cash, paid B. 
William J. 

etc. 
J. Edward 



(Expenditures.) 
L. Makepeace, blue prints 
McCarthy Co., teaming sand, 



L. McLean, carpentering 
on account of contract 
George H. Wickes & Son, painting 
L. A. Wright, iron bands . 



Public Buildings Construction, Building 
Public Buildings. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1909 



Amounts transferred to the following: 
Public Buildings Construction: — 

Addition to Contagious Disease Hos- 
pital .... 

Bath House Addition 

Bath House Addition 

Cummings School Sanitaries 

Cummings School Sanitaries 

Davis School Sanitaries 

Davis School Sanitaries . 

High School Building 

Highland School, Heating and Ventilat- 
ing . . . . . . 

Highland School, Heating and Ventilat- 
ing 

Public Library Construction, West Som- 
erville Branch . 

Soldiers' Monument 



Balance to credit of account, 1910 



$ 53 



$7,000 00 


1,000 00 


362 03 


1,500 00 


14 25 


1,500 00 


81 72 


828 00 


7,000 00 


1,013 99 


449 52 


515 83 



$1,000 00 

362 03 

$1,362 03 



191 84 




558 93 




474 00 




125 23 




11 50 






$1,362 03 





$1,680 83 
20,000 00 

$21,680 83 



21,265 34 
$415 49 



104 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Public Buildings Construction, Cummings 
School Sanltaries. 

CREDIT. 

Public Buildings Construction, Building Public Buildings 
account, amount transferred 

Public Buildings Construction, Building Public Buildings 
account, balance transferred 



i DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid John H. Adcock, on account of 

contract 

plumbing . . 
S. D. Hicks & Son, pipes, etc. 
John Lingard, painting 
J. Edward L. McLean, carpentering 
George F. McKenna, teaming . 
A. W. Phillips, mason work 
Simpson Brothers Corporation, laying 

asphalt floors 

E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 
. Waldo Brothers, cement . 



$150 00 


517 00 


68 00 


91 60 


409 49 


5 00 


98 35 


112 75 


59 36 


2 70 



Public Buildings Construction, Davis School 
Sanltaries. 

CREDIT. 

Public Buildings Construction, Building Public Buildings 
account, amount transferred 

Public Buildings Construction, Building Public Buildings 
account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid F. C. Ayer, lumber 

J. M. Andrews & Son, carpentering 
S. D. Hicks & Son, pipes, etc. 
B. L. Makepeace, blue prints . 
William J. McCarthy Co., mason work 
Frank T. Murphy, painting, etc. 
E. S. Stack & Co., plumbing . 
E. S. Stack, plumbing 
Simpson Brothers Corporation, laying 
asphalt floors 



$1 78 

163 46 

305 00 

60 

156 90 

70 10 

18 70 

680 00 

185 18 



Public Buildings Construction, High School Building. 

CREDIT. 

Public Buildings Construction, Building Public Buildings 
account, amount transferred 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid F. C. Alexander, on account of contract . 



$1,500 00 

14 25 

$1,514 25 



$1,514 25 



$1,500 00 

81 72 

$1,581 72 



$1,581 72 



$828 00 
$828 00 



APrENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S RErORT. 105 



Public Buildings Construction, Highland School 
Heating and Ventilating. 



CREDIT. 



Public Buildings Construction, Building Public Buildings 
account, amount transferred 

Public Buildings Construction, Building Public Buildings 
account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid D. P. Bucknam, mason work 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., piping . 
J. J. Hurley & Co., on account of con 

tract 

Charles H. M. Hunnewell, plumbing 
H. W. Johns-Manville Co., covering 

boilers 

J. E. Locatelli & Co., mason work 
B. L. Makepeace, blue prints . 
G. F. McKenna & Son, teaming 
J. Edward L. McLean, carpentering 



Water Maintenance 
pipes 



account, re-placing 



$56 00 
3 40 


4,870 00 
112 79 


95 00 

1,386 53 

2 90 

62 50 
1,394 14 



$7,983 26 
30 73 



$7,000 00 
1,013 99 

$8,013 99 



$8,013 99 



Public Buildings Haintenance, City Buildings. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 . 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 



County of Middlesex, rent of court room .... 

Receipts: — 

Cash, received of Thomas Ormond, rent . $120 00 

Arthur Murley, rent 120 00 

Walter T. Littlefield, bath house re- 
ceipts 426 66 

B. Cohen, boiler 50 00 

J. J. McCarthy, junk 24 57 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid F. C. Ayer, lumber 

Andrews & Andrews, covering flue 
American Steam Gauge & Valve Co., re- 
pairing 

John Andrews, covering pipes and boiler, 
American Express Co., expressing 
Matthew M. Blount, repairing chair 
Boston Varnish Co., varnish 



Amount carried forward .... $150 13 



$87 68 
5 00 

1 00 
30 00 

20 

2 25 
24 00 



$11,000 00 
2,029 19 

$13,029 19 
600 00 



741 23 



$14,370 42 



106 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
James Bartley, supplies 
Baker School Specialty Co., umbrella 

stands 

Boston Chemical Co., disinfectant . 
Patrick Bowdren, work on lawns . 

C. Bowen, carting lockers 
Bliss Brothers, hardware . 

D. P. Bucknam, mason work . 
F. J. Butler, painting 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., furniture . 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
Cambridge Ice Co., ice . 
L. E. Clayton, cotton cloth 
C. W. Cahalan, plumbing . 
Chandler & Farquhar Co., hardware 
T. A. Cunningham, brush 
M. P. Canfield, work on lawns 
S. H. Davis & Co., hardware . 
James F. Davlin, plumbing 
Derby Desk Co., furniture 
Roger H. Ducey, making and repairing 

carpets, etc 

Davenport-Brown Co., bookcase sec 

tions 

J. A. Durell, wringer 

James Duncan, re-seating chairs 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co. 

lighting 

Enterprise Rubber Co., supplies 
Austin Ford & Son Co., re-pointing 

steps 

F. C. Fuller & Co., hardware . 
Fred W. Farrar, repairing clocks . 
Edwin Fitzgerald, custodian 
Benjamin F. Freeman, photographs 
Glines & Co., expressing . 
Gas Consumers' Association, service 
Eugene Girroir, cleaning boilers, etc. 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 
Globe-Wernicke Co., bookcase 
C. E. Gosse, repairing roof 
Walter J. Godfrey, painting 
Hemeon Brothers, carpentering 
Highland Coal Co., coal . 
Hodge Boiler Works, guards . 
William S. Howe, oakum 
J. J. Hurley & Co., steamfitting 

E. Howard Clock Co., clocks . 

R. Hull, oil 

L. M. Ham & Co., hook . 

James Harper & Co., repairing furni 

ture 

S. D. Hicks & Son, repairing roofs 
William J. Hanson, plumbing . 
Thomas J. Hinds, granolithic walk 
Robert L. Howland, carpentering 
Iver Johnson Sporting Goods Co., bath 

ing suits, etc. 

Amount carried forward 



$150 13 

4 85 

14 00 

2 50 

3 75 

5 60 
5 11 

37 49 

75 

588 05 

322 11 

74 10 

4 14 
46 07 

128 52 

50 

22 50 

13 13 

11 38 

269 00 

37 81 

106 13 

4 25 

16 25 

2,140 61 
19 90 

16 80 

39 55 

13 00 

324 00 

9 00 

40 

28 00 

31 30 

1 55 

57 00 

135 82 

269 24 

45 44 

1,221 24 

50 

10 93 

43 22 

76 00 

24 

30 

28 40 

135 00 

3 40 

110 00 

33 69 

134 10 



$6,796 75 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 107 



Amount brought forward . 
Frank O. Johnson, plumbing . 
James Kenney, carpentering 
Jarvis Engineering Co., grate . 
George T. Johnson & Co., toilet paper 
H. W. Johns-Manville Co., covering 

pipes 

Miss M. A. Jackson, repairing bathing 

stockings .... 

James Kenney, carpentering 
Knott & Co., electrical work . 
T. E. Littlefield, lumber . 
William Leavens & Co., costume pole 
Library Bureau, furniture 
C. A. Legallee, piping 
S. P. Larsen, roofing 
Martin & Wood, keys 
C. F. Mills, carpentering . 
G. F. McKenna & Son, teaming 

B. L. Makepeace, plans . 
William J. McCarthy & Co., teaming 
J. E. L. McLean, carpentering 
George W. Manning, splicing halyards 
McKenney & Waterbury Co., desk 

lights 

Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 
McLean & Cousens, steamfitting 
Mellish & Byfield Mfg. Co., altering 

desk 

Monarch Typewriter Co., table 
Morgan Drug & Chemical Co., dust 

layer 

New England Towel Supply Co., towels 

supplied 

Norton Door Check Co., door check 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
Prescott Brothers, brush . 
Pittsburg Plate Glass Co., glass 
A. W. Phillips, mason work . 
Pearlstein & Sons, clock . 
George L. Robinson, painting . 

W. P. Rice, lumber 

George H. Rupert & Co., sweeper 

spring ' 

George B. Robbins & Co., disinfectant 
Roberts Iron Works Co., grates 
Simpson Brothers Corporation, laying 

floors 

E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 
Standard Charcoal Co., charcoal 
Somerville Coal Co., coal 

C. A. Southwick, extra janitor's ser 
vices 

Mrs. Charles Southwick, cleaning . 

Savage & Son, teaming . 

Sanitary Dust Removing Co., cleaning 

carpets 

Toppan Boat Mfg. Co., oars . 
C. L. Underhill, repairing 

Amount carried forward . 



$6,796 75 
38 75 

3 28 

10 40 

11 50 

255 00 

9 00 

116 44 

579 43 

96 22 

228 00 

180 00 

34 32 

36 30 

4 20 
384 23 

16 75 

9 11 

629 38 

334 95 

16 00 

98 00 

4 00 

12 43 

8 75 

5 00 

4 00 

78 00 

6 50 

13 67 
85 

6 32 

14 51 
3 00 

234 02 
2 13 

60 

15 15 
10 52 

800 57 

215 15 

30 00 

94 20 

50 00 

5 85 
1 50 

65 00 
1 50 
5 30 



$11,576 53 



108 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Underhill Hardware Co., hardware 
Walsh Brothers, mason work . 
Wellington- Wild Coal Co., fuel 
William J. Wiley, plumbing 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co., repairing tools 
John M. Woods & Co., lumber 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co., paint 
G. A. Walker Co., stuffing box 
H. G. White, electrical work . 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
Arthur W. Walker, repairing clock 
Mrs. M. J. Whitney, repairing flag 
West Disinfecting Co., disinfectant 
Asahel Wheeler Co., chamois skins 
H. W. Waite & Co., dust layer 
Henry A. Wheeler Co., awning 
White Laundry Co., laundering 
A. M. Wood Co., iron bars, etc. 
Western Electric Co., supplies 
Walker & Pratt Mfg. Co., stove 



Highways Maintenance account, coal, etc., 
Water Maintenance account, pipe 



$11,576 53 

9 80 

400 53 

1,740 07 

107 49 

1 75 

28 29 

23 00 

65 

161 02 

16 24 



00 
00 
50 
40 



15 00 
17 75 
187 36 
2 45 
27 50 
22 00 



$14,350 33 

14 78 

5 31 



$14,370 42 



Public Buildings Maintenance, Fire Department. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid F. C. Ayer, lumber 
John H. Adcock, plumbing 
Braman, Dow & Co., steamfitting . 
William E. Bucknam, mason work . 
Patrick Bowdren, work on lawns . 
F. J. Butler, painting 
Arthur W. Berry, carpenter work . 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., furniture . 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
Carlisle-Ayer Co., doors . 
Charlestown Gas & Electric Co., gas 
T. A. Cunningham, brushes 
Davenport-Brown Co., lumber 
F. H. Dunning & Co., shades 
J. A. Durell, plumbing 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., light 



rag ..... . 

Albert B. Franklin, grates 
J. J. Fisher, plumbing 

Amount carried forward 



$214 15 


1 65 


5 88 


74 07 


8 75 


136 50 


124 12 


357 10 


40 14 


14 10 


42 39 


40 


20 82 


22 00 


4 04 


1,082 78 


5 30 


4 76 



$5,000 00 
1,081 78 

$6,081 78 



$2,158 95 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



109 



Amount brought forward . 
Fred W. Farrar, repairing clock . 
Gurney Heater Mfg. Co., grate bar 
Gilman Express, expressing 
J. H. Gerlach Co., sheathing . 
Eugene Girroir, steamfitting . 
Highland Coal Co., fuel 
Hodge Boiler Works, repairing boiler 
Charles H. M. Hunnewell, plumbing 
J. J. Hurley & Co., steamfitting 
S. D. Hicks & Son, repairing venti 

lators .... 

Frank O. Johnson, plumbing 
James Kenney, carpentering 
T. E. Littlefield, lumber 
S. P. Larsen, repairing roof 
C. A. Legallee, cleaning drain 
Charles F. Mills, carpentering 
George W. Manning, work on flagstaff 
George F. McKenna, teaming 
A. M. Morton & Co., steamfitting 
G. F. McKenna & Son, teaming 
James W. O'Neil, plumbing . 
A. W. Phillips, mason work 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
Pittsburg Plate Glass Co., glass 
George L. Robinson, painting 
John B. Rufer, bolts . 
Roberts Iron Works Co., repairing 

boiler 

C. H. Sanborn, steamfitting 

Somerville Coal Co., fuel . 

E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 

W. A. Snow Iron Works, pipe, etc. 

John Stackpole, carpentering . 

Underhill Hardware Co., hardware 

C. L. Underhill, supplies . 

Wellington- Wild Coal Co., fuel 

William J. Wiley, pipe 

John M. Woods & Co., lumber 

Waldo Brothers, bricks . 

Asahel Wheeler Co., paint, etc. 

Whitney & Snow, hardware 

H. W. Waite & Co., disinfectant . 

Frederick B. Witherley, grates 



$2,158 95 



00 
1 25 
15 

9 60 

4 00 

342 21 

10 00 

38 70 
15 03 

20 00 
145 63 

39 36 
128 40 
231 00 

4 97 

210 30 

42 75 

5 

1 



13 

09 

75 

15 85 

85 97 

18 31 

1 93 

416 07 

15 51 

4 80 

12 65 

310 40 

15 05 
43 88 

189 45 

16 96 
1 50 

1,373 24 
42 43 
28 29 

4 45 
18 18 
34 79 

7 75 
10 00 



$6,081 78 



Public Buildings Maintenance, Janitors' Salaries. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Cash, paid janitors' salaries 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 



$30,000 00 
921 80 

$30,921 80 
$30,921 80 



110 



AtfNtfAL REPORTS. 



Public Buildings Maintenance, Schoolhouses. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 .... 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 



Stock and labor billed other departments: — 
School Contingent account, telephone tolls 

Receipts: — ■ 
Cash, received of Walter T. Littlefield, 

telephone tolls '..... $84 05 

Mrs. E. H. Norrby, gas ... 13 41 

Sundry persons, use of ward rooms . 38 00 

Sundry persons, damage to property . 2 55 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid American Radiator Co., air 

valves . . . 

Armour & Co., washing powder 
Armstrong Brothers, plumbing 
American Express Co., expressing . 
American Steam Packing Co., packing 
J. M. Andrews & Son, carpentering 
T. Allen, repairing walks . 
American School Board Journal 

journal 

Ashton Valve Co., repairing valve . 
John H. Adcock, plumbing 
F. C. Ayer, lumber .... 
American Seating Co., school furniture 
American Steam Gauge & Valve Mfg 

Co., supplies 

Edward H. Barter, repairing clocks 
Matthew Blunt, repairing chairs 
Boston Feather Duster Co., dusters 
J. A. Bremner, frames and glass . 
W. E. Bucknam, plastering 
Blodgett Clock Co., repairing clocks 
Boston Steam Specialty Co., supplies 
H. C. Bradford, janitor's service 
D. J. Bennett, strap .... 
A. & E. Burton Co., brushes . 
Baker School Specialty Co v repairing 

blackboards .... 
William F. Barker, tools . 
Boston Varnish Co., varnish . 
P. Bowdren, work on lawns . 
Burbank & Ryder Varnish Co., varnish 
Broad Gauge Iron Works, gilded ball 

C. C. Bailey Co., carpet . 
J. E. Bell, repairing blackboards 

D. P. Bucknam, mason work . 
John P. Burke, mason work . 
Frank J. Butler, painting . 

Amount carried forward 



$11 73 

30 03 

81 76 

95 

8 05 

160 83 

159 75 

1 00 
5 50 

3 10 
92 88 

244 80 

2 50 

10 50 

22 50 

104 66 

94 75 

4 20 
46 45 

30 

1 50 

1 75 

75 00 

218 83 
59 37 
48 00 

259 99 
21 00 

3 00 
113 57 

27 39 
218 30 
172 65 
103 15 



$34,000 00 
6,447 55 

$40,447 55 

16 86 



138 01 

$40,602 42 



$2,409 74 



APPEXDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



Ill 



Amount brought forward . 
Bay State Belting Co., belting, etc 
J. F. Brown, repairing clock . 
Bartholomew Burke, laying drain 

D. F. Burke, mason work 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., furniture 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
Carlisle-Ayer Co., lumber, etc. 
T. A. Cunningham, flue brushes 
C. W. Cahalan, plumbing . 
Daniel T. Campbell, plumbing, etc. 
A. L. Carpenter, brushes . 
Chapman Valve Co., plugs 
Charlestown Gas & Electric Co., gas 
George A. Coombs, janitor's service 
Cotter's Express, expressing . 
John A. Cremen, janitor's service . 
L. E. Clayton, supplies 

T. F. Crimmings, repairing drain . 
Crosby Steam Gage & Valve Co., gage 
Cudahy Packing Co., soap polish . 
W. W. Calkin, carpentering 
John Cremen, weighing coal . 

E. P. Cook, disbursements 
R. W. Doe, plumbing 
Dalton-Ingersoll Mfg. Co., drinking 

fountains, etc. 
Thomas C. Dame, janitor's service 
Davenport-Brown Co., lumber . 
J. H. Derby, repairing clocks . 
Julian D'Este Co., gaskets 
J. A. Durell, supplies 
James F. Davlin, plumbing 

F. H. Dunning & Co., shades . 
Roger H. Ducey, making and repairing 

carpets, etc 

S. H. Davis Co., locks, etc. 
H. N. Dearborn, painting 
Alexander Duncan Co., steamfitting 
James Duncan, re-seating chairs 
Ellsworth S. Ernst, carpentering . 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., light 

ing . . . ■ . 
Enterprise Rubber Co., gaskets 
F. C. Fuller & Co., hardware . 
Fred W. Farrar, repairing clocks . 
J. H. Fannon, concrete work . 
Austin Ford & Son Co., mason work 
Fairbanks Co., wheels for trucks . 
J. D. Ford, painting .... 
Fuller & Warren Co., grate . 
Glines & Co., expressing . 
Charles Gallaway, janitor's service . 
Gas Consumers' Association, service 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 
Eugene Girroir, labor 
Walter J. Godfrey, painting . 
C. E. Gosse, gutters .... 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 



$2,409 74 
42 30 

1 50 
6 85 

491 83 

859 32 

974 70 

17 80 

6 75 
391 53 

2 50 
40 00 

2 40 

549 09 

1 50 

25 

1 50 

2 50 
129 82 

2 50 

7 50 
47 50 

50 00 
6 00 

45 14 

237 70 
75 

51 21 

6 50 

7 10 
45 

35 35 

8 00 

73 52 
67 85 
56 75 
14 80 

9 40 

46 22 

2,571 44 

47 07 
62 56 
23 50 

262 20 

39 20 

70 

30 97 

6 75 

17 40 

6 00 

42 00 

5 50 

192 00 

109 58 

66 20 

50 



Amount carried forward 



$10,189 69 



112 



AKtfTJAL KfiPORTg. 



Amount brought forward . 
Hercules Iron & Supply Co., sinks . 
Highland Coal Co., fuel . 
Hodge Boiler Works, repairing boilers 
William S. Howe, pails . 

R. Hull, oil 

Charles H. M. Hunnewell, plumbing 
J. J. Hurley & Co., steamfitting 
Hemeon Brothers, carpentering 
Charles A. Horton, janitor's service 
E. Home, mason work . 
William J. Hanson, repairing valves 
Edgar O. Hunt, plumbing 
S. D. Hicks & Son, roofing 
James Harper & Co., repairing furni 
ture . 

B. E. Higgins, mason work 
Robert L. Howland, carpentering . 
Heyward Brothers & Wakefield Co., ink 

w T ells 

Alfred H. Hines, mason work and car 

pentering 

Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection & 

Insurance Co., insurance 
H. James & Son, soap 
Jenkins Brothers, discs 
H. W. Johns-Manville Co., covering 

pipes 

Frank O. Johnson, plumbing 

Johnson Service Co., steamfitting . 

E. & F. King & Co., soda ash 

Martha Jackson, repairing flags 

Mrs. M. A. Jackson, repairing ensigns 

Frank J. Jameson, sponges 

Kenney Brothers & Wolkins, furniture 

Mrs. Clara Kenney, cleaning 

James Kenney, carpentering . 

E. S. Kearney, sawdust 

Knott & Co., electric work 

John Kennedy, mason work 

E. F. King & Co., soda ash 

S. P. Larsen, roofing . 

T. E. Littlefield, lumber . 

Howard Lowell & Son, board of horse 

George W. Libbey, janitor's service 

John Lingard, painting, etc. . 

J. E. Locatelli & Co., mason work 

Walter T. Littlefield, disbursements 

C. A. Legallee, labor, etc. 
George W. Ladd, jobbing 
Martin & Wood, keys, etc. 
George McDormand, horseshoeing 
George F. McKenna & Son, teaming 
J. E. L. McLean, carpentering 
A. M. Morton & Co., steamfitting . 
Charles F. Mills, carpentering 
George A. McGunnigle, janitor's service, 

Amount carried forward . 



$10,189 69 


4 75 


1,697 03 


77 54 


6 75 


44 88 


61 99 


670 97 


115 08 


75 


14 75 


85 36 


21 80 


1,210 00 


24 25 


118 58 


14 18 



2 00 
69 45 



17 00 


1 50 


3 81 


177 16 


212 95 


45 60 


5 30 


8 00 


11 00 


21 34 


1,134 20 


220 06 


305 04 


15 50 


561 17 


361 88 


10 12 


325 42 


31 51 


320 50 


75 


148 25 


194 57 


15 00 


23 70 


1 60 


12 50 


17 50 


125 66 


614 62 


11 98 


318 15 


2 25 



$19,705 39 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 113 



Amount brought forward .... 
George W. Manning, work on 
flagstaff .... $147 50 

(Cash) .... 12 00 



Morgan Drug & Chemical Co., dust 

layer 

C. W. H. Moulton Co., brooms 

J. C. McLean, furniture 

McLean & Cousens, steamfitting 

Daniel Mclntyre, labor, etc. . 

J. C. Miers & Son, roofing 

Franklin B. Miller, repairing, etc. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

Norton Door Check Co., supplies . 
J. F. O'Brien, janitor's services 
James W. O'Neil, plumbing 
L. A. Penney, carpentering 
Perham's express, expressing . 
Pittsburg Plate Glass Co., glass 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
William H. Page Boiler Co., supplies 
O. M. Pote, janitor's services 
A. W. Phillips, mason work 

A. G. Renner, expressing 
George L. Robinson, painting 
W. P. Rice, lumber .... 
J. W. Rich, janitor's service 
John B. Rufer, iron work 
Roberts Iron Works Co., arch plates, etc 
F. M. Rogers & Co., painting 
C. H. Sanborn, steamfitting . 
Shepard, Clark & Co., floor brushes 

E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 
Standard Charcoal Co., charcoal . 

B. F. Sturtevant & Co., repairing engine 
Somerville Coal Co., fuel 
John Shea, janitor's service . 
George W. Stacey, janitor's service 
Schultz Belting Co., belting . 
P. Sutherland & Co., oil and waste 
W. A. Snow Iron Works, wire fence 
Frank E. Seavey, roofing 
John Stackpole, carpentering . 
J. C. H. Snow, lumber 
T. A. Sallaway, lantern 
Somerville Brush Co., mop handles and 

brushes 

E. S. Stack & Co., plumbing 
E. H. Tarbell Co., shade 
Thorpe's Express, expressing 
Underhill Hardware Co., hardware 

C. L. Underhill, repairing 
Arthur W. Walker, repairing clock 
Walsh Brothers, mason work 

D. W. Webster, repairing chairs 
Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 
Western Electric Co., plugs 

Amount carried forward 



$19,705 39 



135 50 

23 00 

35 30 

36 75 
21 88 
27 73 
88 37 

3 60 

583 83 
3 33 
3 75 
9 2S 
34 25 
1 30 

149 49 

111 38 
1 20 
9 75 

499 05 
55 

278 21 

5 49 
75 

6 85 
531 30 
774 98 

1,390 59 

204 00 

70 92 

36 00 

43 50 

1,791 01 

3 75 

75 

3 38 

45 73 

252 50 

47 14 

93 01 

155 43 

60 

13 00 

3 70 

68 

75 

191 29 

16 50 

10 50 

77 35 

24 15 
11,470 67 

36 

$39,034 52 



114 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 

Asahel Wheeler Co., paint 

H. G. White, electrical work . 

Mary J. Whitney, mending flags, etc. 

Whitney & Snow, hardware . 

H. W. Waite & Co., floor oil, etc. 

G. A. Walker Co., bolts . 

Walters Governor Co., supplies 

Henry R. Worthington, plumbing sup 

plies 

Waldo Brothers, teaming, etc. 

Frederick B. Witherley, grate 

Wade Metal Polish Co., polish 

I. B. Walker & Co., bands for flagpole 

George A. Weld Co., steamfitting 

Henry A. Wheeler & Co., ensigns . 

A. J. Wilkinson & Co., springs 

William J. Wiley, plumbing . 

West Disinfecting Co., disinfectant 

G. A. Walker, painting 

Whitten & Jackson, steamfitting 

John K. Wells, labor 

L. A. Wright, repairing . 



Highway Betterment Assessments account, 

assessment 

Sidewalk Assessments account, assessment, 

Water Maintenance account, replacing and 

repairing pipes 



$39,034 52 

50 43 

441 83 

10 00 
67 67 

265 40 
5 51 
2 50 

11 00 
21 90 

2 52 
1 25 

1 75 
44 60 
36 15 

2 55 
53 26 
15 00 

109 00 

80 02 

27 00 

3 75 

$40,287 61 

66 73 
211 79 

36 29 



$40,602 42 



Public Grounds. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 ... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Stock and labor billed other departments: — 
Sidewalks Construction account, circles 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of Somerville High School 
Athletic Association, labor and mate- 
rials 

Boston Elevated Railway Co., part 

maintenance Broadway parkway . 
Richard Coughlan, lawn mower 
Dennis Neylon, lawn mower . 



DEBIT. 



Cash, paid laborers 

F. C. Ayer, lumber . 
T. Allen, grading 

Amount carried forward 



(Expenditures.) 



$352 15 



$6,962 19 

134 54 

75 00 

$7,171 73 



$11,750 00 
18 84 

$11,731 16 

108 69 



50 00 




1 00 




1 00 






404 15 





$12,244 00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 115 



Amount brought forward .... $7,171 73 

D. J. Bennett, repairing .... 30 75 
Charles E. Berry, labor and materials . 110 35 
Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia ... 552 40 
Boulevard Auto Co., use of car , 30 00 
Barbour-Stockwell Co., castings . 4 50 
Philip Bornstein, hay .... 39 00 
William F. Chester & Co., ladder rounds, 3 00 
Davenport-Brown Co., cedar posts, etc., 9 56 
J. A. Durell, hardware .... 24 79 
J. J. Fisher, plumbing .... 10 40 
Fellows & Co., swings, etc. ... 61 96 
Thomas J. Grey & Co., mower knife, etc. 6 00 
A. C. Gordon, glazing .... 5 75 
Glines & Co., expressing .... 15 
Hemeon Brothers, carpentering . . 249 83 
J. W. Howard, plants .... 1,013 51 
Highland Coal Co., lime .... 10 00 
Iver Johnson Sporting Goods Co., sup- 
plies 8 15 

E. S. Kearney, sawdust .... 8 75 

F. W. Kimball, ash slats .... 17 85 
Martin & Wood, sharpening ... 29 00 
George W. Manning, work on halyards 

and swings 42 50 

William J. McCarthy & Co., crushed 

stone 251 69 

Arthur F. Moynahan, plumbing . . 3 45 

Charles F. Mills, carpentering . . 3 00 

New England Brick Co., bricks . 3 60 

Fulton O'Brion, salt 1 45 

Parker Brothers, repairing water pipe, 2 00 

W. E. Plumer & Co., rope ... 43 46 

George G. Page Box Co., stakes . 2 00 

John B. Rufer, rods, etc. ... 65 45 

E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware . . 32 80 

M. A. Simpson, sand 2 00 

Somerville Iron Foundry, trap . . 1 80 

James Tevlin, use of teams . . 1,133 58 

Robert Travers, repairing flag . . 2 00 

Underhill Hardware Co., supplies . . 63 90 
Walter A. Wood Mowing & Reaping 

Machine Co., repairs .... 7 50 

Henry A. Wheeler & Co., ensigns . 13 62 

Whitney & Snow, hardware . . . 191 23 

I. B. Walker, repairing .... 46 11 

Wright & Ditsoii, bases, etc. ... 28 00 

Woodland Park Hotel, dinners . 27 00 

Walsh Brothers, spraying . . . 183 91 

L. A. Wright, repairing ...... 8 75 

f 

$11,558 28 

City Engineer account, services . . . 200 00 

Highways Maintenance account, labor, etc., 309 52 
Sewers Maintenance account, labor and 

materials . 84 88 

Water Maintenance account, stock and 

labor 91 32 



$12,244 00 



116 



ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 



Public Library. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 . 
County of Middlesex, dog licenses 



Stock and labor billed other departments: — 
Public Library, West Somerville Branch, catalogues, etc. 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of Sam Walter Foss, Librarian: — 

books $93 86 

fines 667 40 

telephone tolls 7 24 



Somerville Y. M. C. A. books . 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Sam Walter Foss, salary as 

librarian 

disbursements 

Florence D. Hurter, assistant librarian 

Esther Mayhew, cataloguer 

Edith B. Hayes, assistant cataloguer 

Anna L. Stone, assistant . 

Mabel E. Bunker, assistant 

Mary S. Woodman, assistant . 

Bessie L. Duddy, assistant 

Nellie M. Whipple, assistant . 

Alice W. Sears, assistant . 

Florence M. Barber, assistant 

A. Myrtle Merrill, assistant 

Ethel M. Nute, assistant . 

Ruby G. White, assistant . 

Bessie S. Cobb, assistant . 

Louise Thiery, assistant . 

Saxton C. Foss, assistant . 

Cecil M. Barlow, assistant 

William E. Bagster, assistant . 

Edgar L. Kaula, assistant 

Harry Benson, assistant . 

Stanley M. Bowlby, assistant . 

Richard Barlow, assistant 

Oscar H. Cederlund, assistant 

A. L. A. Publishing Board, books 

American Express Co., expressing 

American Library Association, member 
ship 

John R. Andrews Co., books . 

A. R. Andrews, supplies 

American Educational Co., books . 

American Political Science Association 
books 

Frank W. Atwood, supplies 

Robert Appleton Co., books . 

John R. Anderson Co., books . 

Amount carried forward 



$2,500 00 

35 00 

800 00 

700 00 

600 00 

650 00 

731 60 

650 00 

600 00 

250 00 

600 00 

600 00 

375 03 

91 64 

120 79 

60 39 

75 00 

55 20 

115 65 

191 70 

125 45 

35 64 
15 70 

8 50 

6 95 

2 10 
52 93 

5 00 
64 95 

7 63 

3 50 

3 00 

8 00 

36 00 
77 51 

$10,254 8Q 



$16,000 00 
3,796 11 

$19,796 11 

19 92 



768 50 
2 21 

$20,586 74 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 117 



Amount brought forward . 
William Abbott, periodicals . 
American Photo. Text-book Co., books, 
American Academy of Political and So- 
cial Science, book . 
Theodore Andel & Co., books . 
William E. Bagster, express . 
Cecil M. Barlow, expressing . 
R. E. Bisbee, books 
Stanley M. Bowlby, expressing 
Balch Brothers Co., books 
The Burrows Brothers Co., books 
Boston Book Co., books . 
Boston Music Co., music books 
Brentano's, books 
Brown's Express, expressing . 
George H. Blake, book . 
George T. Bailey, periodicals 
Boston Suburban Book Co., book 
The Bowker Torrey Co., lettering 
Albert Britnell, books 
Burnham's Antique Book Store, books 
Edward E. Babb & Co., books 
F. G. Bassette Co., books 
Justin J. Bradshaw & Co., supplies 
Cambridge Ice Co., ice . 
Charles W. Clark Co., books 
W. B. Clarke Co., books . 
College Bindery, binding . 
Current Literature Publishing Co., peri 

odical 

Cedric Chivers, books 
Frank W. Collier, books . 
Carnegie Library, books . 
E. J. Cambridge, postage . 
Carter, Rice & Co., supplies . 
Arthur H. Clark Co., books 
Chivers Bookbinding Co., books 
Chappie Publishing Co., books 
Olin S. Davis, supplies 
Desmond Publishing Co., books 
Oliver Ditson Co., music books 
George E. Damon Co., year book 
Dodd, Mead & Co., book 
Dennison Mfg. Co., supplies . 
DeWolfe, Fiske & Co., books 
Frederick J. Drake & Co., books 
Essex Institute, periodical 
Educational Review, periodical 
Charles Evans, book . 
Engineering News Publishing Co 

books ..... 

T. T. Fryer, books . 
David Farquhar, binding 
Fitzherbert & Wing, periodicals 
Benjamin F. Freeman, photographs 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 
Glines & Co., expressing . 

Amount carried forward 



$10,254 86 


11 50 


30 00 


5 00 


2 80 


4 50 


32 85 


3 37 


75 60 


6 00 


14 38 


12 45 


10 48 


10 97 


1 30 


75 


13 91 


1 50 


18 08 


6 90 


2 00 


4 95 


15 95 


1 75 


19 35 


72 75 


730 75 


543 03 


25 


62 28 


68 


11 00 


14 00 


35 


6 30 


94 38 


6 47 


56 50 


119 75 


48 30 


2 00 


4 50 


94 


574 55 


8 00 


2 00 


35 


15 00 


18 47 


41 00 


666 11 


20 50 


25 50 


105 91 


11 80 



$13,824 62 



118 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . . 
Herman Goldberger, periodicals 
H. J. Graham, books .... 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 
Ginn & Co., books .... 
W. A. Greenough & Co., books 
Globe Stamp Works, supplies 
Goodspeed's Book Shop, book 
The Grafton Press, books 
Granite State Publishing Co., books 
O. S. M. Haskell, agency . 
Heaton's Agency, books . 

D. C. Heath & Co., books 
H. R. Huntting Co., books 
Houghton Mifflin Co., books 
L. A. E. Harding, agency 
S. Henry Hadley, music books 
Hildreth Family Association, book 
J. L. Hammett Co., books 
Inventive Age, periodical . 

E. W. Johnson, books 
Journal of American History, periodical 
H. A. Kent, binding . 
W. A. Keating, books " . 
George H. Kent, books . 
John Lane, periodical 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Co., books 
Lexington Book Shop, books 
Library of Congress, cards 
C. S. Lombard & Co., agency 
C. F. Libbie & Co., books 
Library Bureau, stamps and supplies 

J. B. Lippincott Co., books and peri 

odicals 

George E. Littlefield, books . 
Charles E. Lauriat Co., books 
The Macmillan Co., books 
McDevitt-Wilson, books 
S. F. McLean, books 
Henry Malkan, books 
Municipal Journal, books 
Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 
Moody Manual Co., books 

F. B. McDewell^ books . 
Medford Historical Society, periodical 
H. D. Martin, books .... 
Mt. Tom Press, books 

Marshall, Son & Co., supplies . 
Massachusetts Magazine, periodical 
National Educational Association 

books 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

Niel Morrow Ladd Book Co., books 
New York & New England Publishing 

Co., books .... 
National Book Cover Co., supplies 
Neostyle Co., repairs 

Amount carried forward 



45 

00 
15 
50 



$13,824 62 

441 81 

1 50 

59 17 

55 04 

14 00 

2 

2 

2 

3 

107 57 
1 25 

5 75 
97 06 
38 50 
14 47 

1 13 

1 00 
33 63 

50 

13 70 

3 00 

20 00 

79 76 

90 

2 50 
1,604 32 

92 38 

2 50 
75 00 
41 11 

6 76 
48 32 

8 13 

64 65 

1,256 72 

7 86 
82 07 

3 50 
22 08 

5 00 
17 00 
10 00 



50 
25 

00 
25 



11 15 

6 00 

2 00 

42 71 

7 75 

50 80 
2 70 

7 85 



$18,311 32 



APPENDIX TO TREASURES AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 119 



Amount brought forward . 
Old Corner Book Store, books 
Outing Publishing Co., periodical . 
Oliver Typewriter Co., supplies 
Perham's Express, expressing 
Publishers' Weekly, periodicals 
G. P. Putnam's Sons, books . 
The Pandex Co., periodical 
The Prince Society, books 
Poor's Railroad Manual Co., book 
Pilgrim Press, periodical . 
S. A. Riker, agency .... 
Harry J. Ramsey, agency . 
Review of Reviews, books 
Rudder Publishing Co., periodical . 
Ritter & Flebbe, books . 
Charles S. Robertson, insurance 
Rand, McNally & Co., books . 
A. J. Renner, expressing . 
P. B. Sanford Co., binders 
Charles Scribner's Sons, books 
Somerville High School Radiator, peri 

odical 

Somerville Journal Co., printing 

Superintendent of Documents, books 

C. A. Southwick, Jr., expressing . 

Schoenhof Book Co., books 

Charles I. Shepard, books 

Sampson & Murdock Co., directory 

Theo. E. Schulte, book . 

Somerville Historical Society, periodical 

R. E. Sherwood, books . 

The Smith Book Co., books . 

The System Co., book 

Sprague & Hathaway Co., picture frame 

Silver Lotus Shop, book . 

Southern Publication Society, books 

Somerville Post-office, postage 

Tabard Inn Book Co., books . 

C. W. Tibbetts, periodical 

Topsfield Historical Society, periodical 

Thorpe's Express, expressing . 

Torch Press, book .... 

Underhill Hardware Co., supplies . 

Underwood & Underwood, stereograph 

Union Library Association, books . 

University of Chicago Press, book and 

periodical 

M. L. Vinal, agency and supplies . 
Williams & Neiley, printing . 
H. W. Wilson Co., books 
World's Scrap Book Co., supplies . 
R. H. White Co., books . 
Samuel Ward Co., supplies 
The Wage Earner, periodical . 
H. C. White Co., stereographs 
John Wiley & Sons, books 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co., supplies 
Alice M. Young, agency . 
Yale University Press, books . 
Zion's Herald, periodical . 



$18,311 32 

51 40 

25 

17 62 

17 20 

15 50 
9 73 

10 00 
10 00 

10 00 
2 50 

8 23 
260 00 

6 00 
50 

17 26 
67 50 
22 63 

50 

481 63 

54 64 

75 

560 16 

2 00 

11 90 
104 21 

9 50 

6 00 

7 70 

3 00 

18 13 
14 00 

2 00 
90 

1 60 
40 00 

25 00 

3 80 
1 00 

92 
50 

10 00 

4 23 
19 

59 02 

5 55 
73 66 
58 50 

26 00 

3 50 
29 56 

11 78 
1 00 

16 67 

4 14 
1 25 

88*51 
4 45 
1 25 



$20,586 74 



120 ANNUAL EEPOBTS. 

Public Library, Frances A. Wilder Children's 
Department Fund. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 190S $100 00 

DEBIT. 

Balance to credit of account, 1910 $100 00 

Public Library, Frances A. Wilder Children's 
Department Fund, Income Account. 

CREDIT. 

Receipts: — 
Cash, income from invested funds $4 40 

DEBIT. 

Balance of account unused, carried to 1910 .... $4 40 



Public Library, Frances A. Wilder Children's 

Department Fund, Investment Account. 

CREDIT. 

Balance to debit of account, 1910 $100 00 

DEBIT. 

Balance from 1908 $100 00 

Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Art. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 $4,251 66 

DEBIT. 

Balance to credit of account, 1910 _ $ 4 > 251 6( j. 

Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Poetry. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 $^ 062 92 

DEBIT. 

Balance to credit of account, 1910 $1,062 92 

Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Income, Art. 

) CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 • $ 35 62 

Receipts: — 
Cash, income from invested funds . . $240 00 

Interest on deposits 20 40 

260 40 



« , $296 02 

Balance of account unused, carried to 1910 . . . . 127 27 

$168 75 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 121 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Desmond Publishing Co., books, 

T. T. Fryer, books 

Goodspeed's Book Shop, etched por- 
trait 

Charles E. Lauriat Co., books 
Library Art Club, membership 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
Manhattan Book Store, books 
McDevitt- Wilson, books . 
Old Corner Book Store, books 
Ritter & Flebbe, books . 
Francis M. Tilton, stereographs 
Underwood & Underwood, stereo- 
graphs 

H. C. White Co., stereographs 



512 00 


24 00 


3 60 


8 24 


6 00 


9 89 


1 50 



27 00 

2 50 

25 00 

21 00 

8 80 

19 22 



$168 75 



Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Income, Poetry. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 

Receipts: — 
Cash, income from invested funds 
Interest on deposits .... 



Balance of account unused, carried to 1910 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid W. B. Clarke & Co., books 
Dodd, Mead & Co., books 
DeWolfe, Fiske & Co., books . 
Charles E. Lauriat Co., books . 
Little, Brown & Co., books . 
Old Corner Book Store, books 
Charles I. Shepard, books 



$2 19 


6 15 


2 92 


25 14 


11 73 


4 00 


3 00 



$24 29 



$60 00 
5 10 


65 10 




. 


$89 39 
34 26 



$55 13 



$55 13 



Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Investment Account. 

CREDIT. 

Balance to debit of account, 1910 $5,314 58 



DEBIT. 



Balance from 1908 . 



$5,314 58 



122 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Public Library, West Sotnerville Branch. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Receipts : — 

Cash, received of Nellie M. Whipple, custodian: — 

fines $126 52 

books ....... 4 95 

telephone tolls ..... 1 80 



$2,500 00 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Nellie M. Whipple, custodian 
Ethel M. Nute, assistant . 
Irma R. Christopher, assistant 
Annie M. Currie, assistant 
Bessie S. Cobb, assistant . 
Alice Hunnewell, assistant 
Ronald Moore, assistant . 
Louise Thiery, assistant . 
Harold Currie, assistant . 
John R. Anderson Co., books 
Frank W. Atwood, supplies 
Cambridge Ice Co., ice 
Carter, Rice & Co., supplies . 
Chivers Book Binding Co., books 
Harold Currie, expressing 
Charles W. Clark Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke Co., books . 
Dodd, Mead & Co., books 
DeWolfe, Fiske & Co., books . 
Dennison Mfg. Co., stationery 
David Farquhar, binding . 
Globe Stamp Works, supplies 
Herman Goldberger, periodicals 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directory 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 
Caroline L. Himebaugh, books 
H. R. Huntting Co., books 
W. A. Keating, books 
Kimball Brothers, books . 
Library Bureau, cards 
Little, Brown & Co., books . 
Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, books 
Charles E. Lauriat Co., books . 
McDevitt-Wilson, books . 
S. F. McLean, books 
Joseph McDonough Co., books 
Macmillan Co., books 
Henry Malkan, books 
Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 
Marshall Son & Co., supplies . 
Newold Publishing Co., books 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 
Co., service .... 

Amount carried forward . 



$408 35 

175 00 

60 39 

95 50 

58 31 

6 90 
43 99 

4 58 

2 50 
30 71 

4 00 

5 00 

3 00 
30 74 
24 40 
18 70 

212 69 

1 50 

76 01 

1 16 
209 81 

4 15 
147 38 

4 00 
13 83 
26 67 
67 98 
17 29 

5 75 
33 12 

204 06 

90 

71 16 

40 08 

7 50 

13 50 
5 40 

79 41 
4 25 

2 51 
48 95 

14 23 



133 27 
$2,633 27 



$2,285 36 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 123 



Amount brought forward . 
New York & New England Publishing 

Co., books .... 
Leslie H. Steele, periodicals . 
A. Storrs & Bement Co., supplies 
Sampson & Murdock Co., directory 
Sprague & Hathaway Co., frames 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
John Skinner's Book Store, books 
C. A. Southwick, Jr., expressing 
Charles I. Shepard, books 
P. B. Sanford Co., binders 
R. E. Sherwood, books 
The Smith Book Co., books . 
Theo. E. Schulte, books . 
Tabard Inn Book Co., books . 
Union Library Association, books 
Williams & Neiley, printing . 
S. Ward & Co., stationery 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co., supplies 



Public Library account, cards, books, etc., 



$2,285 36 



17 50 


15 80 


50 


6 00 


2 00 


C 90 


7 50 


10 90 


6 60 


58 60 


95 61 


2 60 


30 75 


25 77 


26 21 


5 75 


7 95 


1 05 



$2,613 35 
19 92 



$2,633 27 



Public Library Construction, West Somerville Branch. 



CREDIT. 



Public Buildings Construction, Building 
Public Buildings account, amount 
transferred 

Cash, received of Andrew Carnegie, gift 



_-•■;.! DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Belledeu, on account of con- 
tract 

Library Bureau, on account of con- 
tract 

Mellish & Byfield, on account of con- 
tract 

Mortensen & Holdensen, on account of 
contract 

McLean & Wright, on account of con- 
tract 

Whitten & Jackson, on account of con- 
tract 

McKenney & Waterbury, electrical fix- 
tures 

Library Bureau, chairs .... 



Jlighways Maintenance account, construct- 
ing driveway, etc 



$7,593 26 


473 00 


893 00 


650 00 


247 64 


400 53 


235 00 
45 00 


$10,537 43 


44 59 



$449 52 
10,132 50 

$10,582 02 



$10,582 02 



124 ANNUAL KEPOETS. 

Public Property. 

CREDIT. 

Balance to debit of account, 1910 $5,360,829 14 

DEBIT. 

Property and Debt Balance, property ac- 
quired in 1909 $58,746 06 

Balance from 1908 5,302,083 08 



$5,360,829 14 



Real Estate Liens. 



DEBIT. 



Balance from 1908 . $2,293 76 

Taxes, tax of 1903 assessed City of Cambridge . . . 364 64 

tax of 1904 assessed City of Cambridge . . . 364 64 

tax of 1904 assessed Butler & Robinson ... 4 48 



Redemption of Tax Liens. 



CREDIT. 



$3,027 52 



CREDIT. 

Balance to debit of account, 1910 $3,027 52 



Cash, received of sundry persons, redemption of tax liens $667 97 

Amount accruing to city under Chapter 443, Acts of 1902, 

carried to City Treasurer account .... 15 00 



$652 97 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid sundry persons, redemption of tax liens . $652 97 



Reduction of Funded Debt. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 $4,000 00 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 ..... 145,000 00 

Water Works Income, amount appropriated, Water Bonds 6,000 00 

Water Works Income, balance transferred . . . 12,128 24 



$167,128 24 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . . 10,519 34 



$156,608 90 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of R. L. Day & Co., premium on bonds . 891 10 

$157,500 00 

DEBIT, 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid bonds maturing in 1909 $157,500 00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 125 



Sanford Hanscom School, Land Addition. 

CREDIT. 

Sewers Construction account, amount transferred 
Balance to credit of account, 1910 



$3,500 00 
3,500 00 



School Contingent. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 . 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, tuition of state wards, 
Cash, received of Charles S. Clark, super- 
intendent of schools, tuition of non- 
resident pupils, etc $229 18 

damage to property .... 148 69 

Dorothy Adams, tuition .... 25 34 

A. B. Palmer, tolls 1 35 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Charles S. Clark, salary as 

superintendent of schools 
disbursements 
Mary A. Clark, assistant 
Mildred A. Merrill, assistant . 
Justin W. Lovett, truant officer 

disbursements 
Jairus Mann, truant officer 
American Book Co., books 
Adams, Cushing & Foster, supplies 
Henrietta B. H. Attwood, disbursements 
John A. Avery, disbursements . 
Allen, Doane & Co., supplies . 
Allyn & Bacon, books . 
D. Appleton & Co., books 
Mary A. Atherton, books . 
Atkinson, Mentzer & Grover, books 
Edward E. Babb & Co., books and sup 

plies 

Bates & Guild Co., books 

F. J. Barnard & Co., binding . 

Baker School Specialty Co., supplies 

C. C. Birchard & Co., books . 

Milton Bradley Co., books and supplies 

Brown-Durrell Co., supplies 

Boston Bank Note Co., printing . 

Elizabeth J. Baker, supplies . 

Bay State Paper Co., supplies 

First Methodist Church, use of edifice 

Baker & Adamson Chemical Co., supplies 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., supplies 

Amount carried forward 



$3,000 00 

318 01 

708 33 

566 67 

1,304 17 

8 16 

50 00 

763 34 

1,491 46 

2 52 

25 09 
20 00 

250 57 
22 93 
91 99 
13 17 

4,623 06 

2 00 

936 13 

10 10 

463 71 

258 45 

26 95 
202 94 

2 00 

17 82 

150 00 

110 11 

28 70 

$15,518 38 



$27,000 00 
202 46 

$26,797 54 
246 00 



404 56 



$27,448 10 



i26 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Bumpus & Cook, repairing 
Benton Brothers, supplies 
Jason P. Briggs, census . 
Carter's Ink Co., supplies 
N. H. Crowell, supplies . 
E. T. Curtis, supplies 
James H. Chase, services 
Chandler & Barber, supplies 
Harry L. Cutting, services 
William H. Claflin Co., supplies 
Cook- Vivian Co., supplies 
E. S. Daniels, tuning piano's 
Oliver Ditson Co., books . 
A. L. Doe, disbursements 
DeWolfe, Fiske & Co., books 
Clara Z. Elliot, census . 
Educational Publishing Co., books 
J. S. Emerson, disbursements 
Eimer & Amend, supplies 
George H. Ellis Co., books 
J. H. Folkins Co., ink 
The M. Abbott Frazar Co., supplies 
W. K. Farrington Press, engrossing 
Funk & Wagnalls Co., books 
W. C. Fickett, census 
Ginn & Co., books . 
Annie M. Gilcrease, census 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 
Glines & Co., expressing 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directories 
The Globe-Wernicke Co., supplies 
D. C. Heath & Co., books 
J. L. Hammett Co., supplies . 
Harvard University, books 
Houghton Mifflin Co., books . 
Holden Patent Book Cover Co., b-iok 
covers ...... 

J. W. Howard, supplies . 

S. Henry Hadley, orchestra . 

Houghton & Dutton, supplies 

Edward A. Hart, writer press 

H. F. Hathaway, disbursements 

S. A. Johnson, disbursements . 

George F. King & Co., supplies 

L. E. Knott Apparatus Co., supplies 

R. E. Kibbe, engrossing . 

Harlan P. Knight, disbursements . 

John Lane, books .... 

Library Bureau, supplies . 
LaBree & Bumpus, supplies . 
Howard Lowell & Son, carriage hire 
J. B. Lippincott Co., books 
Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Co., books 
Little, Brown & Co., books . 
Joseph A. Moore, books . 
Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 
McKinley Publishing Co., maps 
Bunkio Matsuki, supplies . 

Amount carried forward . 



$15,518 38 
61 39 
11 30 

19 78 
45 15 
43 12 
89 57 
15 00 

235 55 

2 00 

6 00 
107 63 

35 00 
91 48 
14 10 
22 36 
42 86 

166 81 

7 43 
235 30 

5 00 
28 20 

4 00 
32 65 

8 50 
31 52 

2,375 29 

64 34 

65 

89 36 

8 00 

10 25 

507 53 

172 85 

8 20 

125 82 

36 35 

4 05 
272 00 

3 00 
162 78 

92 
27 32 

5 00 
222 56 

82 24 

20 10 
10 00 
10 00 

3 85 

7 00 

8 70 

1 65 

9 75 

2 00 
85 15 
14 45 

2 09 

$21,233 33 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 12? 



Amount brought forward . 
Middlesex County Truant School, board 

of truants 

Mitchell Mfg. Co., supplies 

Charles E. Merrill Co., books 

Marine Biological Laboratory, sup 

plies 

D. J. Moynahan, use of team . 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

Neostyle Co., supplies 

New England Dressed Meat & Wool 

Co., supplies 

W. E. Plumer & Co., supplies 
A. B. Palmer, disbursements . 
Philadelphia Distributing Co., supplies 
Perkins Woodworking Co., lumber 
Remington Typewriter Co., repairing 
Rand, McNally & Co., maps . 
Charles Scribner's Sons, books 
Silver, Burdett & Co., books . 
Shattuck & Jones, supplies 
Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., supplies 
Somerville Journal Co., printing . 
Suffolk Ink Co., ink .... 
Benjamin H. Sanborn & Co., books 
Sibley & Co., books .... 
Sprague & Hathaway Co., supplies 
Somerville Evening Sun, printing . 
S. F. Sherman, tuning piano . 
Oscar W. Short, services . 
Schoenhof Book Co., books . 
C. H. Stoelting Co., supplies . 
St. Louis Biological Laboratory, sup 

plies 

William D. Sprague, disbursements 
Mary C. Thurston, supplies 
Thorp & Martin, supplies 
Thompson-Brown Co., supplies 
Richard H. Tincker, census 
The Twinlock Co., supplies 
Underwood Typewriter Co., repairing 
M. L. Vinal, supplies 
The Writer Publishing Co., books . 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co., supplies 
F. S. Webster Co., supplies 
Whitney & Snow, supplies 
John M. Woods & Co., lumber 
Williams & Neiley, printing . 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co., supplies 
Winter Hill Press, printing 
Mina J. Wendell, disbursements . 
Samuel Ward Co., supplies 
H. C. White Co., supplies 
Elisabeth S. Webster, census . 



Public Buildings Maintenance, School- 
houses account, telephone tolls . 



$21,233 33 



791 56 


93 


23 91 


12 90 


2 00 


186 99 


99 60 


60 


412 95 


6 37 


85 


930 05 


2 60 


39 80 


3 03 


503 47 


6 00 


225 90 


683 12 


49 44 


654 67 


7 30 


2 30 


21 25 


2 50 


18 00 


48 22 


4 75 


3 00 


5 00 


13 16 


12 15 


16 15 


71 68 


12 75 


12 45 


69 52 


13 37 


607 24 


5 40 


125 00 


118 53 


245 75 


9 05 


37 40 


12 89 


10 25 


20 27 


30 84 



$27,431 24 
16 86 



$27,448 10 



128 



ANNUAL fcEPOETS. 



School Teachers' Salaries. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 . . 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid salaries as per pay rolls 

(Cash) 



$293,209 85 
3 50 



$295,000 00 
1,793 65 

$293,206 35 



$293,206 35 



Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of John H. Dusseault, fees for weighing 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid John H. Dusseault, salary as 

sealer of weights and measures . . $1,100 00 

disbursements 179 65 

use of team 137 60 

Benjamin S. Abbott, deputy sealer of 

weights and measures .... 700 00 
Dennison Mfg. Co., seals .... 3 00 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directory . 4 00 
Glines & Co., expressing .... 45 
William & L. E. Gurley, tools, etc. . 46 10 
John J. Hargraves, acid .... 21 50 
Hobbs & Warren Co., books and sta- 
tionery 4 05 

William B. Holmes, tools ... 1 50 

A. C. Libby & Sons, books ... 19 61 

Wesley A. Maynard, advertising . . 4 00 

F. E. Marsh, dry measure gauge . . 1 50 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 27 55 

Rhode Island Label Works, seals . . 3 50 

Somerville Journal Co., advertising . 7 00 

Whitney & Snow, hardware ... 2 96 
Woodman Mfg. & Supply Co., stamp, 

cutter, etc 17 55 



$1,800 00 
21 80 

$1,778 20 

503 32 

$2,281 52 



$2,2S1 52 



Sewer Assessments. 

CREDIT. 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry persons 
Balance to debit of account, 1910 . 



$2,340 92 

9,752 78 



$12,093 70 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 129 

DEBIT. 

Balance from 1908 ...... $4,218 56 

Sewers Construction account, as- 
sessments levied . . . $7,903 94 
Less abatements .... 28 80 

7,875 14 

$12,093 70 



Sewers, Construction. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 $10,832 03 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1909 .... 30,000 00 

Sewer Assessments account, assessments 

levied $7,903 94 

Less abatements 28 80 

7,875 14 



Reduced by the following transfers: — 

Benjamin G. Brown School, Land Addition 
account 

Electrical Department, Underground Con- 
struction account 

Fire Department, Additional Apparatus ac- 
count 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings 
account 

Sanford Hanscom School, Land Addition 
account 



Balance to credit of account, 1910 



Stock and labor billed other departments:— 
Sidewalks Construction account, edgestones 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of W. A. Sanborn & Co., cement 



$48,707 17 



$1,500 


00 




1,500 


00 




5,000 00 




7,670 


95 




3,500 


00 


19,170 95 




• 


. 


$29,536 22 
13,766 01 




$15,770 21 


5 . 

lent 


• 


22 62 

46 50 





DEBIT. 




(E 


xpenditures.) 




Cash, paid laborers 


... 


$2,570 18 


Bartholomew 7 Burke, 


constructing 




sewer: — 






Acadia park 


... 


155 97 


Curtis avenue . 


... 


600 00 


Proposed street 


... 


1,997 35 


Walker street . 


. 


296 30 


Timothy F. Crimmings, 


constructing 




sewer: — 






Florence street 


* p • 


330 30 


Hill street 


• • • 


229 78 


Ossipee road . 


• . • 


619 03 


Powder-house boulevard 


• • • 


1,438 31 


Whitfield road 


. 


321 88 



$15,839 33 



Amount carried forward .... $8,559 10 



130 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward .... 
James H. Fannon, constructing sewer: — 

Cedar street 

Elm street 

William J. McCarthy & Co., construct- 
ing sewer: — 

Belknap street .... 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight . 
William H. Casey & Co., bricks 
Edwin O. Childs, Register, recording 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 
Highland Coal Co., cement . 
W. B. Mullen, sand .... 
New England Brick Co., bricks 
Portland Stone Ware Co., 

drain pipe .... $1,144 41 
(Cash) . . . . 7 88 



Somerville Iron Foundry, castings 
W r . A. Sanborn & Co., bricks . 
James Tevlin, use of teams 
Waldo Brothers, pipe and 

cement $583 67 

(Cash) . . . . 182 77 



Frederick B. Witherley, traps 
Williams & Neile) r , printing 



City Engineer account, labor 

Highways Maintenance account, repairing 

sidewalk 

Water Maintenance account, drain pipe 



$8,559 10 

521 06 
2,104 60 



382 11 

15 96 
18 63 

11 35 

16 50 
431 20 

12 24 
296 64 



1,136 53 

685 57 

43 13 

767 42 



400 90 
45 04 
15 00 



$15,462 98 
225 00 



104 30 

47 05 



$15,839 33 



Sewers, Maintenance. 



CREDIT. 



Water Works Income account, amount appropriated 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 



Stock and labor billed other departments 
Highways Construction account, changing 
grade of catch basins .... 
Highways Construction, Lowell Street 
Bridges account, changing grade, etc., 
Public Grounds account, labor and mate- 
rials 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of Cambridge Gas Light Co., 

labor 

Highland Coal Co., cement bags 
Boston Elevated Railway Co., changing 

grades 

G. A. Stephens, old hose .... 
M. Norton & Co., old hose 
Stephens Mfg. Co., old hose . . 



$528 


69 


407 28 


84 88 


$66 


17 


52 00 


45 


64 


18 


00 


14 74 


13 


10 



$12,000 00 
29 60 

$11,970 40 



1,020 85 



209 65 



$13,200 90 



APrENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S RErORT. 131 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers 

D. J. Bennett, repairing wagon 
Charles E. Berry, making poles 
J. H. Brooks, cloth . 
Boulevard Auto Co., use of cars 
Cornelius Callahan Co., repairing 
Davenport-Brown Co., lumber 

E. W. Danforth, car fares 
Edson Mfg. Co., repairing hose 
H. Fisher, suits and hats . 
Fred W. Farrar, repairing clock 
Thomas Groom & Co., books . 
William S. Howe, box for clock 
Hemeon Brothers, labor . 
A. R. Hyde, boots . 
D. Mahoney, patching 
Martin & Wood, sharpening . 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service .... 
New England Oil Co., oil 
M. Norton & Co., rubber dishes 
New England Brick Co., bricks 
Somerville Iron Foundry, castings 
Walter H. Snow, catering 
James Tevlin, use of teams . 
Anna S. Tevlin, washing flags . 
Waldo Brothers, drain pipe 
I. B. Walker, repairing wagons 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
Williams & Neiley, dials . 
Frederick B. Witherley, grates 



City Engineer account, services . 
Highways Maintenance account, gravel 



$7,733 67 



3 50 


2 92 


38 


15 00 


6 75 


5 30 


30 00 


13 95 


43 80 


5 00 


16 50 


10 07 


1 00 


57 00 


7 70 


3 10 


54 12 


12 41 


50 


69 84 


124 69 


5 00 


4,741 07 


2 00 


34 35 


25 22 


75 26 


5 00 


14 00 



$13,119 10 

75 00 
6 80 



$13,200 90 



Sidewalk Assessments. 



CREDIT. 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry persons 
Balance to debit of account, 1910 . 



$13,412 56 
6,565 29 

$19,977 85 



DEBIT. 

Balance from 1908 ^ 

Sidewalks Construction account, 

assessments levied . . $12,083 18 
Less abatements .... 92 49 



$7,987 16 



11,990 69 



$19,977 85 



132 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Sidewalks, Construction. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1909 . 
Sidewalk Assessments account, assessments 

levied 

Less abatements 



Balance to credit of account, 1910 



Stock and labor billed other departments 
Highways Maintenance account, lumber 

Receipts: — 
Cash, paid Abraham B. Beal, granolithic walk 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid laborers 

F. C. Ayer, lumber . 
Thomas Allen, granolithic 
Thomas Groom & Co., books 
S. & R. J. Lombard, edgestones 
W. A. Sanborn & Co., bricks . 



Highways Maintenance account, use of 

teams 

Public Grounds account, circles . 

Sewers Construction account, edgestones . 

Sidewalk Assessments account, assessment, 



Sidewalks, Maintenance. 

CREDIT. 

Highways Maintenance account, amount transferred, 

Stock and labor billed other departments: — 
Highways Construction account, bricks . $44 88 

Highways Maintenance account, bricks . 40 09 



. 


$309 13 
12,000 00 


$12,083 18 
92 49 






11,990 69 




. 


$24,299 82 
66 69 


i 


$24,233 13 




10 33 


<. . 


13 10 



$10,635 54 

30 33 

217 35 

13 00 

8,143 47 

1,405 78 


$20,445 47 

3,612 94 

108 69 

22 62 

66 84 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of J. A. Durell, labor 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers 

Thomas Allen, repairing sidewalk . 
W. A. Sanborn & Co., bricks . 


$758 45 

4 00 
233 97 


Highways Maintenance account, use of city 
teams 


$996 42 
172 24 



$24,256 56 



$24,256 56 

$1,082 19 

84 97 

1 50 

$1,168 66 



$1,168 66 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 133 



Soldiers' Burials. 



DEBIT. 



(Expenditures.) 
Dusseault, services as 



Cash, paid J. H 
burial agent 
Edwin G. Brown, burial . 
John Bryant's Sons, burials 
W. T. Gill, burial 
Doherty Brothers, burial . 
John E. Kauler, burial 
G. F. McKenna & Son, burial 
Francis M. Wilson, burials 



$26 00 
35 00 

140 00 
35 00 
35 00 
35 00 
35 00 

140 00 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, amount charged De- 
cember 31, 1909 



$481 00 
$481 00 



Soldiers' rionument. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 . 

Public Buildings Construction, Building Public Buildings 
account, amount transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid Austin Ford & Son Co., 

masonry 

Augustus Lukeman, on account of con- 
tract 



Highways Maintenance account, teaming 



$141 75 

11,786 00 

$11,927 75 

6 55 



$11,418 47 

515 83 

$11,934 30 



$11,934 30 



Soldiers' Relief. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid sundry persons as per 

pay rolls .... $23,290 64 

(Cash) .... 9 00 



Howard Lowell & Son, carriage hire 



$23,281 64 
4 00 



$23,000 00 
285 64 

$23,285 64 



$23,285 64 



Somerville Hospital. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid for support of sick poor . 



• t 



$5,000 00 
$5,000 00 



134 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



State Aid. 



CREDIT. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, state aid paid in 1909 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid monthly pay rolls 

(Cash) 



$16,680 00 
93 00 



$16,592 00 
5 00 

$16,587 00 



$16,587 00 



Street Lights. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid Edison Electric Illuminating Co., lighting 



$50,000 00 
2,298 63 

$52,298 63 



$52,298 63 



Sundry Persons. 

Balance from 1908 



CREDIT. 



DEBIT. 

Balance to credit of account, 1910 



$699 65 
$699 65 



Support of Poor, City Home. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Stock and labor billed other departments: — 
Health Department, Contagious Disease Hospital ac- 
count, produce 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of J. Foster Colquhoun, 

produce $4,027 77 

Town of Arlington, board . . . 730 00 

Fred L. Hawkins, board .... 40 10 

Ellen C. Eagan, board .... 27 50 

Michael Flemming, board ... 10 50 

Cambridge City Home, plants . 5 72 

J. W. Howard, plants . 4 00 



$3,000 00 
464 92 

$2,535 08 
182 16 



4,845 59 



$7,562 83 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 135 



DEBIT. 
(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid J. Foster Colquhoun, salary as 

warden 

disbursements 
Mrs. Catherine Colquhoun, matron 
Sundry persons, farm help 
Sundry persons, house help 
Andrew Blyth, groceries . 
George W. Clatur, groceries . 
W. B. Chase, groceries 
Chase & Sanborn, groceries . 
Clark Brothers Co., groceries . 
J. H. Dickerman, groceries 
Myrton F. Evans, groceries . 
George G. Fox Co., groceries 
L. C. Fisher & Co., groceries . 
C. D. Gallagher, groceries 
F. J. Hopkins, groceries . 
E. F. Hicks, groceries 
Charles A. Holmes, groceries . 
Amos Keyes & Co., groceries 
New England Mfg. Co., groceries 
J. S. Newcombe & Co., groceries 
National Biscuit Co., groceries 
J. W. Roberts & Co., groceries 

C. L. Stevens, groceries . 
A. S. Tyler, groceries 

D. J. Bennett, harness repairs 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 
Boston Plate & Window Glass Co. 

glass 

Bowers & DeWick, dry goods 

Joseph Breck & Sons Corporation 

seeds, etc. .... 

H. A. Brownell, repairing harness 
Brown-Durrell Co., clothing . 
Cambridge Ice Co., ice 
Henry N. Clark Co., grates . 
J. H. Derby, repairing clocks . 
Empire Laundry Machinery Co., wash 

ing machine, etc. 
Willis S. Furbush, medicine . 
H. E. Fiske Seed Co., seeds . 
Fuller Mfg. Co., hoe 
S. Finlay, papers 

Farley, Harvey & Co., pillow slips 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 
Thomas Groom & Co., books . 
Walter Gordon, pig . 
D. J. Green & Co., mat, brooms, etc 
H. E. Gustin, plants . 
Percy A. Hall, medicine 
Highland Coal Co., lime . 
A. H. Hews & Co., flower pots 
I. N. Holman, sharpening lawn mower 
Haskell Implement & Seed Co., ferti 

lizer 

Amount carried forward . 



$700 00 
145 38 
350 00 
993 94 
586 61 

38 06 
24 60 

39 90 
78 09 
71 70 
13 41 

4 86 
195 30 



50 

00 



93 12 

2 75 
7 14 

136 53 

141 65 

640 65 

49 05 

368 60 

127 48 

7 84 

71 65 

6 71 

5 68 

6 75 

30 69 

3 00 
29 67 
26 00 

5 72 

5 80 

500 00 

6 10 

20 05 



1 



00 

77 
02 
20 
75 



3 
1 

6 50 



63 
16 



71 64 

15 34 

3 80 

5 25 

26 45 



$5,692 49 



136 



ANNUAL BF.PORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
C. P. Holmes, boxes 
Hovey & Co., seeds .... 
Mrs. Emma S. Hall, domestic fee . 
George T. Johnson & Co., supplies 
Jordan Marsh Co., kitchen ware . 
George W. Ladd, horseshoeing 
T. E. Littlefield, lumber . 
Lord & Webster, hay and grain 
C. W. Lerned & Co., disinfectant . 
David W. Lewis Co., stove pipe 
George W. Ladd, horseshoeing 
McGreenery & Manning, tobacco . 
Miley Soap Co., soap 
Massachusetts State Prison, clothing 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service ..... 
Fulton O'Brion, hay and grain 
T. J. Owens, papers .... 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
The Park & Pollard Co., poultry sup 

plies 

Proctor Brothers, grain . 
George G. Page Box Co., boxes . 
Reuben Ring & Co., medicine 
John B. Rufer, clipping 
W. W. Rawson & Co., seeds . 
Reid & Hughes Co., kitchen ware . 
Parke Snow, dry goods . . ' . 
Somerville Journal Co., envelopes . 
Smith & Thayer Co., H. D. grate . 
E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 
John P. Squire & Co., shavings 
Stumpp & Walter Co., seeds . 
Schlegel & Fottler Co., seeds . 
Elbert J. Smith, hair cutting . 
E. D. Sawyer Lumber Co., lumber 
Arthur Sternberg, suit 
George H. Thayer, boots and shoes 
William J. Thompson & Co., hay . 
Nathan Tufts & Sons, grain . 
Underhill Hardware Co., hardware 
R. H. White Co., lamp . 
William J. Wiley, hardware . 
Wilson, Larrabee & Co., dry goods 
I. B. Walker, repairing wagon 
Waldron & Shepard, boxes 



Health Department, Collection of Ashes 
and Offal account, offal 



$5,692 49 


26 40 


7 45 


30 


1 00 


56 35 


33 25 


45 44 


140 08 


4 00 


. 2 84 


3 50 


42 00 


17 25 


28 50 


l 

42 69 


230 76 


9 22 


31 03 


22 70 


62 69 


95 29 


25 75 


4 00 


4 60 


7 77 


88 14 


1 75 


1 29 


5 70 


16 25 


22 70 


50 23 


2 25 


77 80 


12 00 


62 80 


26 06 


122 49 


10 32 


2 60 


40 09 


6 41 


83 10 


6 25 



$7,275 58 
287 25 



$7,562 83 



Support of Poor, Miscellaneous. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1909 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



$13,500 00 
785 93 



Amount carried forward 



$12,714 07 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 137 



Amount brought forward . . . 

Receipts: — 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, support 

paupers 

Cash, received of sundry persons, aid . 
Charles C. Folsom, money not called 

for 

C. Clark Towle, old typewriter 
For support of paupers: — 

City of Boston 

City of Cambridge . 

City of Chelsea 

City of Everett 

City of Fall River 

City of Gloucester 

City of Haverhill 

City of Holyoke 

City of Lowell 

City of Maiden 

City of Medford 

City of Marlborough 

City of New Bedford 

City of Newton 

City of Quincy 

City of Springfield 

City of Taunton 

City of Woburn 

City of Worcester 

Town of Andover 

Town of Attleboro 

Town of Arlington 

Town of Brookline 

Town of Braintree 

Town of Boylston 

Town of Framingham 

Town of Gardner 

Town of Leominster 

Town of Reading 

Town of Revere 

Town of Saugus 

Town of Stoneham 

Town of Stow 

Town of Truro 

Town of Wakefield 

Town of Weston 

Town of Williamstown 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid Charles C. Folsom, salary as 

agent 

disbursements 

C. Clark Towle, M. D., city physician . 
Cora F. Lewis, secretary . 
Florence R. Kenneson, clerical services, 
Relief of paupers: — 
City of Boston 



of state 
$119 48 

16 50 

15 00 

606 08 
643 77 
105 50 
115 89 
22 65 
40 00 

31 43 
24 00 

156 24 
98 85 
96 15 
55 71 
10 85 

238 64 

13 00 
18 90 
18 00 
66 44 

132 44 

10 00 
18 14 

102 86 

11 43 
29 14 

32 43 

12 43 
8 57 

52 17 
18 00 
34 00 
28 01 
39 45 
28 71 
36 86 

16 16 
32 00 

14 29 



$12,714 07 
958 93 



Amount carried forward 



$1,600 00 

193 10 

1,500 00 

700 00 

120 00 

1,926 31 

$6,039 41 



3,170 17 



$16,843 17 



138 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward 

City of Cambridge 

City of Everett 

City of Lowell 

City of Lynn 

City of Melrose 

City of Newton 

City of Worcester 

City of Woburn 

Town of Attleboro 

Town of Barnstable 

Town of Lexington 

Town of Rockland 

Town of Revere 

Town of Winchester 

Town of West Springfield 

Cambridge Relief Hospital 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Foxboro State Hospital 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics, 

Massachusetts School for Feeble- 

Minded 

Somerville Hospital, relief of sick poor, 
Somerville Visiting Nursing Associa- 
tion, nursing .... 
Mary Drury, board . 
Benjamin W. Goldsmith, board 
Edward Hunnewell, board 
Maria L. Meserve, board . 
Mary Murray, board . 
Edith M. Nntt, board 
Jennie L. Nichols, board 
Hattie G. Sellon, board . 
Emmeline K. Willis, board 
H. G. Applin, groceries . 
C. E. Barrows, groceries . 
Charles S. Butters, groceries . 
James Bartley, groceries . 
Edward Coliten & Son, groceries 
A. F. Carpenter, groceries 
F. E. Cheney Co., groceries . 
J. F. Dowd, groceries 
James Davis, groceries 
Harry A. Dunham, groceries . 
Charles F. Giles, groceries 
Grace & Hatfield, groceries 
F. A. E. Jewell, groceries 
C. R. King, groceries 
M. A. Kimball, groceries 
M. D. Lovering, groceries 
Frank M. Lowell, groceries . 
M. D. Lewis, groceries 
J. D. MacLennan, groceries 
James H. Maguire Co., groceries 
North Packing & Provision Co 

groceries 
A. E. Robie, groceries 
Andrew F. Ryan, groceries 

Amount carried forward 



$6,039 

410 

23 

69 

50 

12 

84 

33 

26 

92 

121 

13 

42 

151 

8 

21 

20 

337 

194 

6 

29 



41 
12 
57 
00 
25 
00 
36 
75 
59 
00 
25 
71 
50 
39 
00 
91 
00 
77 
21 
87 
25 



253 50 
2,250 11 

200 00 
30 00 

104 30 
52 17 
43 30 
84 85 

104 30 

13 15 

8 72 

52 17 
257 00 
112 00 

53 00 
270 00 
171 00 

66 00 

92 00 

122 00 

263 00 

26 00 

457 58 

84 00 

338 00 

33 50 

66 00 

39 00 

18 00 

246 00 

313 50 

61 00 

180 50 

38 00 

158 00 

$14,454 56 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 139 






Amount brought forward . 
Mrs. C. H. Sands, groceries . 
R. M. Sturtevant & Co., groceries . 

C. L. Stevens, groceries . 

D. E. Watson, groceries . 
George W. Wood, groceries . 
J. H. Brooks, dry goods . 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., carpet 
Charles W. Dailey, ambulance 
W. J. Emerson, boots and shoes . 
Edward Edwards, medicine 
W. A. Flaherty & Son, burials 
Fresh Pond Ice Co., ice . 
C. H. Goldthwaite & Co., truss 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 
F. W. Gilbert, boots and shoes 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directory 
Samuel Hurwitz, boots and shoes . 
The G. F. Harvey Co., medicine . 
Howard Lowell & Son, carriage hire 

E. S. Merriam, medicine . 
Alfred E. Mann, burial 
Monroe Pharmacal Co., medicine . 
John S. McGowan, burial 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

Frederick H. Perry, printing . 
P. H. Rafferty, burials 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., type 

writer 

Wellington- Wild Coal Co., fuel 



Taxes. 



CREDIT. 



Receipts: — 

Cash, received for taxes of 1903 

" 1904 

" " " 1905 

" " " 1906 
u u a « 29Q7 

u 190g 
" " " 1909 

Overlay and Abatement: — 

Abatements on taxes of 1903 

" 1904 

" " " 1905 

" 1906 

« u u 19()7 

" 1908 
" 1909 



$14,454 56 

498 00 

454 50 

1 00 

10 00 

26 00 

9 00 

99 75 

12 90 

4 50 

106 85 

50 00 



3 00 
2 50 

32 90 
16 00 

4 00 
1 25 

45 13 



00 
05 



45 00 
40 50 
15 00 

113 27 

24 75 
45 00 
18 50 

110 25 

588 01 



$10 10 

12 00 

70 39 

187 46 

2,021 06 

269,867 41 

988,724 92 



$2,315 40 
1,914 72 
717 29 
1,679 82 
1,640 84 
3,066 41 
8,203 94 



Real Estate Liens, taxes of 1903, City of Cambridge 

" " 1904', Butler and Robinson 
Amount carried forward *»,,,, 



$16,843 17 



$1,260,893 34 



19,538 42 
364 64 
364 64 

4 48 

$1,281,165 5g 



uo 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Balance to debit of account, 1910: — 
Being uncollected taxes of 1904 

1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 



DEBIT. 

Balance from 1908 

Tax Levy, as per assessors' warrant of 

August 10, 1909 

Supplementary warrants, amounts credited 

to Overlay and Abatement account . 
Overlay and Abatement account, moth tax 

re-assessed 



. $1,281,165 52 



$463 96 
2,917 42 
2,281 34 
3,448 17 
6,654 68 
267,571 94 



$300,005 23 

1,260,144 32 

4,356 48 

2 00 



283,342 51 
$1,564,508 03 



$1,564,508 03 



Temporary Loans. 



CREDIT. 



Balance from 1908 . . _ . 

Cash, borrowed by authority of the Board 

of Aldermen on notes as follows: — 
City Notes Nos. 691-2-3, 251 days, 3.02 

per cent., discounted .... 
City Notes Nos. 694 to 697, 236 days, 3 

per cent., discounted .... 
City Notes Nos. 698 to 705, 310 days, 

3.24 per cent., discounted 
City Note No. 706, six months, 3 per 

cent., discounted 

City Notes Nos. 707 to 722, 266 days, 

3.61 per cent., discounted 



$375,000 00 



DEBIT 



Cash, paid as follows:— 
City Note No. 682 
City Note No. 683 
City 'Note No. 684 
City Note No. 685 
City Note No. 679 
City Note No. 680 
City Note No. 681 
City Note No. 686 . 
City Notes Nos. 687-688 
City Notes Nos. 691-2-3 
City Note. No. 706 . 
City Notes Nos. 694 to 697 



Balance to credit of account, 1910 



(Expenditures.) 



$150,000 00 

100,000 00 

150,000 00 

25,000 00 

200,000 00 



625,000 00 
$1,000,000 00 



$50,000 00 
50,000 00 
25,000 00 
25,000 00 
25,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
25,000 00 
75,000 00 

150,000 00 
25,000 00 

100,000 00 

$650,000 00 
350,000 00 



$1,000,000 00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 14l 
Water Loan Interest. 

CREDIT. 

Water Works Income, amount appropriated . . . $2,460 00 

DEBIT. 

Coupons maturing April 1, 1909: — 

$24,000, six months, 4 per cent. 
Coupons maturing July 1, 1909: — 

$10,000, six months, 4 per cent. 
Coupons maturing October 1, 1909: — 

$24,000, six months, 4 per cent. 
Coupons maturing January 1, 1910: 

$9,000, six months, 4 per cent. 



Registered Bonds: — 

Interest due April 1, 1909 . 
Interest due October 1, 1909 



• 


$480 00 


• 


200 00 


. 


480 00 


• 


180 00 




$1,340 00 


$560 00 
560 00 


1,120 00 





Water flaintenance. 



CREDIT. 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry persons, costs . $93 00 

Sundry persons, pipe, fittings, etc. . 10,382 84 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co., 
grounding wires 125 00 



Stock and labor billed other departments: — 

Highways Construction account, stock, 

labor, etc $152 41 

Highways Maintenance account, stock and 

labor . 23 84 

Highways, Sprinkling Streets account, 

maintenance of water posts . . 292 62 

Public Buildings Construction, Highland 
School Heating and Ventilating ac- 
count, replacing pipes .... 30 73 

Public Buildings Maintenance, City Build- 
ings account, pipe .... 5 31 

Public Buildings Maintenance, School- 
houses account, replacing and repair- 
ing pipes 

Public Grounds account, stock and labor 

Sewers Construction account, drain pipe 

Water Works Extension account, stock 



$2,460 00 



Water Works Income, amount appropriated . . $30,000 00 
Less unexpended balance 4,265 23 



$25,734 77 



10,600 84 



36 29 




91 32 




47 05 




13,279 50 






13,959 07 



$50,294 68 



142 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



i DEBIT. ! 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers $19,948 08 

Frank E. Merrill, salary as water com- 
missioner . . . ' . . . 2,300 00 

disbursements 92 30 

Charles E. Childs, inspector . . . 884 53 

disbursements 28 95 

Lillian E. Leavitt, assistant . . . 900 00 

Laura E. Peavey, assistant . . . 690 95 

Marion L. Morrison,, clerical services . 270 00 

Josephine M. Briggs, clerical services . 8 00 

Bertha M. Boyd, clerical services . 96 00 

American Express Co., expressing . 8 78 

The Anderson Coupling Co., couplings 444 89 

• Philip Aberle, stamps .... 482 48 

Algonquin Motor Car Co., gear , . 11 75 

Town of Arlington, pipe . . . 32 50 

Boston Varnish Co., paint ... 5 50 

Charles Booth, wood .... 48 00 

Braman, Dow & Co., pipe . . . 560 76 

D. J. Bennett, repairing harnesses . 121 20 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight . 606 58 

Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co., hose 3 00 

Boston Elevated Railway Co., tickets . 25 00 

Boston Elevated Railway Co., labor . 115 00 

Builders' Iron Foundry, supplies . 58 96 

Herbert E. Bowman, medicine . . 4 93 

Harold L. Bond Co., packing . 20 72 

Justin J. Bradshaw & Co., book . . 2 25 

Chadwick-Boston Lead Co., pipe . . 768 15 

Chapman Valve Mfg. Co., valves . 81 49 

Crane Co., valves 14 96 

Coffin Valve Co., gate stem ... 4 85 

Codman & Shurtleff, pumps ... 3 00 

William R. Conrad, pipe inspection . 83 91 

Julian D'Este Co., brass ... 206 61 

Davenport-Brown Co., labor ... 1 50 

Davis & Farnum Mfg. Co., castings . 29 63 

Eastern Salt Co., salt .... 5 25 

The Eliot Co., cabinet, etc. . . . 42 06 

A. A. Elston & Co., plank ... 14 35 
Edson Mfg. Co., repairs to pump . 15 70 
The Fairbanks Co., valves ... 23 98 
Brooks Faxon, repairs to motor . . 6 65 
Fire & Water Engineering, subscription 3 00 
Fresh Pond Ice Co., ice . . . 109 79 
Gilman Express Co., expressing . 55 66 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directory . 4 00 
Garlock Packing Co., packing . . 1 50 

B. F. Goodrich Co., tire and repairs . 52 44 
Thomas Groom & Co., books ... 82 00 
F. W. Gilbert, rubber boots ... 4 50 
Glines & Co., expressing ... 60 
Globe Gas Light Co., repairing torch . 75 
Charles R. Hildred, labor ... 5 00 
Hersey Mfg. Co., meter parts . . 62 12 
Fred M. Hutchinson, expenses ... 8 39 



Amount carried forward 



$29,463 00 



ArPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S RERORT. 143 



Amount brought forward . 
E. C. Hartshorn, negative, etc. 
Highland Coal Co., cement 
William S. Howe, zinc 
Hale & Mayhew Co., wagon repairs 
R. D. Hildred, machine work 
O. L. Hill, use of car, etc. 
Holt & Bugbee Co., wood 
Independent Ice Co., ice 
J. A. Kiley, wagon repairs 
Kennedy Valve Mfg. Co., valves 
George W. Ladd, shoeing 
Lead Lined Iron Pipe Co., pipe and 

fittings 

C. W. Lerned & Co., disinfectant 

Library Bureau, cards 

Lord & Webster, hay and grain 

T. E. Littlefield, lumber 

Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., valve 

Cyril J. Larivee, lumber 

Edwin Leavitt, car fares 

Martin & Wood, sharpening tools 

W. B. Mullen, sand 

Wesley A. Maynard, printing 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., fittings 

Charles Millar & Son Co., pipe 

Thomas McNeill, expenses 

Walter Macleod & Co., furnace 

Norwood Engineering Co., hydrant 

parts 

New England Oil Co., oil 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service .... 
Neptune Meter Co., meters 
New England Towel Supply Co., towel 

supplied 

National Meter Co., meter parts 
Fulton O'Brion, hay and straw 
Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
Proctor Brothers, grain 
Pratt & Cady Co., valves 
George G. Page Box Co., boxes 
Priest, Page & Co., adjusting scale 
Rensselaer Mfg. Co., hydrant parts 
Wilbur P. Rice, lumber 
J. E. Richardson, services 
John B. Rufer, horseshoeing 
Estate of J. E. Richardson, services 
Richards & Co., pig lead 
Somerville Iron Foundry, castings 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
E. S. Sparrow & Co., supplies 
Standard Oil Co., of New York, drum 

etc 

Shawmut Tire Co., shoes 
Scott & Tingloff, rings 
Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., repairs 
Sumner & Gerald, fittings 

Amount carried forward . 



$29,463 00 

2 40 
62 82 

3 65 
8 75 

33 00 



90 

83 



47 
1 
43 60 

189 25 

10 50 
106 30 

1,887 10 

34 60 

38 80 

161 48 

14 49 

34 20 

7 99 

3 70 

7 75 

12 24 

9 13 

70 74 

190 40 

7 53 
75 00 

170 25 
127 67 

202 06 
464 04 

5 40 

1 75 

423 40 

98 50 

86 04 

201 38 

73 75 

70 00 

1 90 

876 80 

132 78 

8 00 
34 20 
14 50 

188 50 

370 42 

403 53 

14 10 

42 95 
25 36 
14 50 
1 30 
14 40 

$36,595 63 



iu 



ANNTTAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Somerville Post-Office, postage 
Thorpe's Express, expressing 
Thomson Meter Co., meters 
Turner & Co., envelopes 
Fred J. Thomsen, car fares 
Nathan Tufts & Sons, oats 
L. H. Truesdell & Co., sign 
M. E. Tighe, teaming 
Union Water Meter Co., fittings 
Underhill Hardware Co., hardware 
Charles L. Underhill, wagon repairs 
Union Glass Co., globes 
W. H. Vinton, washers 
Winter Hill Ice Co., ice 

. A. J. Wilkinson & Co., hardware 
Welch, Dwyer & Grady, wagon repairs 
Williams & Neiley, printing 
Samuel Ward Co., stationery 
Frederick B. Witherley, castings 
Walworth Mfg. Co., wrenches 
R. Woodman Mfg. & Supply Co., wire 
R. D. Wood & Co., pipe, etc. 
Henry R. Worthington, meter parts 



Highways Maintenance account, labor and 
materials 



$36,595 63 

200 00 

1 00 

1,551 60 

48 45 

14 00 

252 22 

28 00 

18 52 



99 
168 10 
181 50 

8 50 
10 75 
31 15 
93 64 

9 50 
28 25 
67 13 

274 64 

19 10 

20 00 
6,597 32 
3,158 96 

$50,266 95 

27 73 



$50,294 68 



Water Service Assessments. 



CREDIT. 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry persons, cost of services laid 
Transferred to Water Works Extension account 



$3,816 32 
3,816 32 



Water Works, Abatements on Water Charges. 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid sundry persons, money refunded 
Transferred to debit of Water Works Income account 



$183 63 
183 63 



Water Works Extension. 



CREDIT. 



Water Works Income account, amount appropriated 
Less unexpended balance 



Water Service Assessments account, amount transferred 



$15,000 00 
801 92 

$14,198 08 
3,816 32 



$18,014 40 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 145 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers $3,740 56 

Bartholomew Burke, contract labor . 374 47 

Timothy F. (Trimmings, contract labor 619 87 



$4,734 90 
Water Maintenance account, stock . . 13,279 50 



186 13 






DEBIT. 

Water Maintenance account, 

amount appropriated . . $30,000 00 

Less unexpended balance . . 4,265 23 

$25,734 77 

Reduction of Funded Debt, Water Loan 

Bonds, amount appropriated . . 6,000 00 

Water Loan Interest, amount appropriated 2,460 00 

Water Works Extension account, 

amount appropriated . . $15,000 00 

Less unexpended balance . . 801 92 

14,193 OS 



Sewers Maintenance account, amount ap- 
propriated 12,000 00 

Fire Department account, amount appro- 
priated 33,000 00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Metro- 
politan Water Assessment . . . 112,573 20 



Table D.— Balances. 

Cash $112,839 55 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts . . 17,583 00 

Fire Department 2,197 21 

Grade Crossings 9,376 54 

Health Department ... . 3,082 92 
Health Department, Collection of Ashes 

and Offal 5,072 99 



$18,014 40 



Water Works Income. 

CREDIT. 

Metered Water Charges, last quarter district No. 1, 1909, 

uncollected $15,664 46 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry water takers . $207,615 96 

Metered water charges . $2 50 

Less abatements . . . 183 63 



207,429 83 

Total income, sales of water $223,094 29 

Reduction of Funded Debt, balance transferred . . 12,128 24 



$210,966 05 



$210,966 05 



Amount carried forward .... $150,152 21 



14:6 



AXXUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward .... $150,152 21 
Health Department, Contagious Disease 

Hospital 709 12 

Highway Betterment Assessments . . 3,394 37 

Inspection of Buildings .... 168 95 

Metered Water Charges .... 15,664 46 

Police 8,161 84 

Public Buildings Maintenance: — 

City Buildings 2,029 19 

Fire Department 1,081 78 

Janitors' Salaries ... . . . 921 80 

Schoolhouses 6,447 55 

Public Library: — 

Frances A. Wilder Children's Depart- 
ment Fund, Investment .... 100 00 
Isaac Pitman Fund, Investment . . 5,314 58 

Real Estate Liens 3,027 52 

Sewer Assessments 9,752 78 

Sidewalk Assessments 6,565 29 

Soldiers' Relief 285 64 

Street Lights 2,298 63 

Taxes 283,342 51 

Assessors $189 24 

Benjamin G. Brown School, Land Addition . . . 1,500 00 

City Auditor 20 57 

City Clerk 69 77 

City Engineer 30 86 

City Messenger 107 91 

City Solicitor 70 31 

City Treasurer 236 16 

Clerk of Committees and Departments .... 62 15 

Contingent Fund 77 72 

Coupons 14,937 50 

Excess and Deficiency 9,756 80 

Election Expenses: — 

City Clerk 631 92 

Commissioner of Public Buildings .... 277 09 

Pay of Election Officers 62 00 

Registrars of Voters 152 03 

Electrical Department ... .... 129 88 

Electrical Department, Underground Construction . . 928 90 

Executive Department 62 89 

Fire Department, Additional Apparatus . . . 5,059 55 

Health Department, Medical Inspection in Public Schools 72 55 

Highways Construction 5,951 51 

Highways Construction, Lowell-Street Bridges . . 31,567 13 

Highways Maintenance 12,341 59 

Highways, Suppression of Elm-leaf Beetle . . . 153 20 

Highways, Suppression of Gypsy and Brown-tail Moths . 2,176 15 

Highwavs, Sprinkling Streets 10 96 

Interest' 14,069 20 

Military Aid 390 00 

Overlay and Abatement . 6,882 29 

Overplus on Tax Sales 118 13 

Printing and Stationery 514 77 

Public Buildings Construction: — 

Building Public Buildings 415 49 

Addition to Contagious Disease Hospital . . . 2,937 60 

Public Grounds 18 84 



Amounts carried forward 



$499,418 22 $111,982 66 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 147 



Amounts brought forward . . . $499,418 22 

Public Library: — 

Frances A. Wilder Children's Department Fund 

Frances A. Wilder Children's Department Fund, 
Income 

Isaac Pitman Fund, Art 

Isaac Pitman Fund, Poetry 

Isaac Pitman Fund, Income, Art 

Isaac Pitman Fund, Income, Poetry 
Reduction of Funded Debt 
Sanford Hanscom School, Land Addition 
School Contingent 
School Teachers' Salaries 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Sewers Construction 
Sewers Maintenance 
Sidewalks Construction . 
State Aid . ... 
Sundry Persons 
Support of Poor, City Home 
Support of Poor, Miscellaneous 
Temporary Loans . 



$111,982 66 
100 00 

4 40 
4,251 66 
1,062 92 

127 27 

34 26 

10,519 34 

3,500 00 

202 46 

1,793 65 

21 80 

13,766 01 

29 60 

66 69 

5 00 
699 65 
464 92 
785 93 

350,000 00 



$499,418 22 $499,418 22 



±48 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



APPROVAL OF TREASURER'S REPORT. 



In Committee on Finance, February 10, 1910. 
To the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville: — 

Gentlemen: The committee on finance presents the report of Edwin 
L. Pride, expert accountant, as its report as an audit of the books and 
accounts of the City Treasurer, and recommends that the report of the 
treasurer be printed in the annual reports of 1909. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ray R. Rideout, "] 

Jesse E. Perry, | 

Alphonso A. Wyman, I 
Leslie E. A. Smith, ( 

Paul R. Valentine, | 

William E. CopithorneJ 



Committee 

on 
Finance. 



In Board of Aldermen, February 10, 1910. Accepted. 

Frederic W. Cook, Clerk. 






REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



School Committee Rooms, January 1, 1910. 
Ordered, that the annual report of the Superintendent be 
adopted as the annual report of the Board of School Com- 
mittee, it being understood that such adoption does not commit 
the Board to the opinions or recommendations made therein ; 
that it be incorporated in the reports of the City Officers ; and 
that 1,000 copies be printed separately. 

Chaeles S. Claek, 
Secretary of School Board. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1909. 



Henry H. Folsom, Chairman 

George C. Mahoney, Vice-Chairman 

MEMBERS. 

Term expires 
. EX-OFFICIIS. January. 

John M. Woods, Mayor, 47 Spring street. 1910 

Charles A. Burns, Pres. Board of Aldermen, 27 Thurston street. 1910 



Dr. Henry F. Curtis, 
Emory F. Chaffee, 



Daniel H. Bradley, 
Thomas M. Clancy, 



WARD ONE. 



145 Perkins street. 
109 Pearl street. 



WARD TWO. 



19 Concord avenue. 
52 Springfield street. 



1910 
1911 



1910 
1911 



WARD THREE. 



George E. Whitaker, 
Wilbur S. Clarke, 



75 Walnut street. 
40 Vinal avenue. 



WARD FOUR. 

Charles A. Kirkpatrick, Jr., 27 Sewall street. 

George W. Foster, 7 Evergreen avenue. 



ward five. 



Henry H. Folsom, 
J. Walter Sanborn, 



Frederick A. P. Fiske, 
Dr. Leonard H. Pote, 



103 Central street. 
183 Central street. 



ward six. 



44 Cherry street. 
694 Broadway. 



WARD SEVEN. 



1910 
1911 



1910 
1911 



1910 
1911 



1910 
1911 



Dr. George C. Mahoney, 97 College avenue. 1910 

*Mrs. Henrietta B. H. Attwood, 12 Park avenue. 1911 

f Harry G. Chase, 37 Sawyer avenue. 1910 

Superintendent of Schools. 

• / Charles S. Clark. 

Office: City Hall Annex, Highland avenue. 

Residence: 82 Munroe street. 

The Superintendent's office will be open on school days from 8 to 
5; Saturdays, 8 to 10. His office hours are from 4 to 5 on school days, 
and 8 to 9 on Saturdays. 

Office telephone, 314; house telephone, 12. i 

Superintendent's clerks: — 

Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland avenue. 

Mildred A. Merrill, 26 Cambria street 



* Died May "21, 1909. 

t Ejected September 15, 1909. 



STANDING COMMITTEES, 1909. 



Note. — The member first named is chairman. 

High Schools.— Sanborn, Mahoney, Curtis, Clancy, Clarke, Foster, 
Fiske. 

District I. — Curtis, Chaffee, Foster. 

PRESCOTT, HANSCOM, DAVIS, BENNETT. 

District II. — Bradley, Clancy, Clarke. 

KNAPP, PERRY, BAXTER. 

District III.— Whitaker, Clarke, Curtis. : i : 

POPE, BELL, CUMMINGS. 

District IV.— Kirkpatrick, Foster, Chaffee. J 

EDGERLY, GLINES. 

District V. — Folsom, Sanborn, Kirkpatrick. , , 

FORSTER, BINGHAM. 

District VI. — Fiske, Pote, Folsom. 

CARR, MORSE, PROCTOR, DURELL, BURNS, BROWN. 

District VII. — Mahoney, Chase, Fiske. 

HIGHLAND, HODGKINS, LINCOLN, LOWE. 

Additional School Accommodations. — Mahoney, Sanborn, Curtis 
Clancy, Clarke, Kirkpatrick, Fiske, Woods, Burns. 

Evening Schools. — Fiske, Folsom, Whitaker. 

Finance. — Chaffee, Bradley, Whitaker, Woods, Burns. 

Industrial Education. — Foster, Clarke, Chase. 
Medical Inspection. — Curtis, Pote, Mahoney. 
Music. — Curtis, Bradley, Chase. 

Private Schools. — Clancy, Pote, Kirkpatrick. ' 

Repairs of School Buildings. — Folsom, Clancy, Foster. 
Rules and Regulations. — Bradley, Fiske, Mahoney. 
Salaries. — Kirkpatrick, Whitaker, Sanborn. 
Supplies. — Clarke, Chaffee, Sanborn. 

Text-Books and Courses of Study. — Whitaker, Chaffee, Bradley, JCirk* 
patrick, Folsom, Pote, Chase. 

Vacation Scljqol§. — Pote, Foster, Cto§. .,.._., ! 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



To the School Committee of Somerville : — 

Herewith is respectfully submitted the thirty-eighth an- 
nual report of the Superintendent of Schools, the second pre- 
pared by the present writer. It contains statistical tables and 
summaries which reveal facts of cost and attendance such as 
have usually been furnished by the School Committee for the 
information of the public. A few additional tables are supplied 
because of their timely interest. Certain phases of the work 
of the schools and certain problems of organization are dis- 
cussed at length, but many of the most interesting and vital of 
the school activities are passed over without comment, not be- 
cause of their lack of importance, but because of the proper 
limitations upon the length of such a report. Following the 
order of presentation which has been in use for a number of 
years, the first item is : — 

1. — Summary of Statistics. 

Population, United States census, 1890 40,117 

Population, state census.. 1895 52,200 

Population, United States census, 1900 61,643 

Population, state census, 1905 69,272 

Children between live and fifteen years of age, October, 

_ 190S, by school census 12,217 

Children between five and fifteen years of age, October, 

1909, by school census 12,419 

Increase 202 

2.— SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

1908. 1909. Decrease. 

Number of school buildings 26 2d 

Number of classrooms in use in December 287 286 1 

Valuation of school property $1,443,280 

3.-TEACHERS. 

1908. 1909. Increase. 

In high schools 58 59 1 

In grammar schools 164 166 2 

In primary schools 104 105 1 

In kindergartens 8 8 

Total in elementary schools 276 279 3 

Cadet teachers 1 3 2 

Special 10 10 

Total 345 351 6 

4.- ATTENDANCE FOR YEAR. 

1908. 1909. Increase. 

Entire enrollment for the year 15,105 15,363 253 

Average number belonging 12,159 12^423 264 

Average number attending 11.458 11,666 208 

Per cent, of daily attendance 94.2 93.9 —0.3 

High school graduates 235 265 30 

Grammar school graduates 742 741 — 1' 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 153 

5.— ATTENDANCE IN DECEMBER. 

1908. 1909. Increase. 

Whole number attending 14,640 14,813 173 

In private schools 1,838 1,906 68 

In public schools 12,802 12,907 105 

In high schools 1,663 1,769 106 

In elementary schools 10,943 10,931 —12 

In kindergarten 106 207 11 

In first grade 1,572 1,595 23 

In second grade 1,430 1,404 —26 

In third grade 1,349 1,346 —3 

In fourth grade 1,307 1,307 

In fifth grade 1,300 1/249 -51 

In sixth grade 1,211 1,199 -12 

In seventh grade 1,138 1,122 —16 

In eighth grade 865 950 85 

In ninth grade 771 759 —12 

6. -COST OF SCHOOL MAINTENANCE. 

1908. 1909. Increase. 

Salaries of teachers $289,190.45 $293,209.85 $4,019.40 

Salaries of officers 5,210.50 5,629.17 418.67 

Cost of books and supplies. . 26,377.15 21,818.93 -4,553.22 

Cost of light 3,830.73 4,070.71 239.93 

Cost of janitors' services... 25,245.19 26,071.97 826.78 

Cost of fuel 14,911.94 1-1.798.06 —113.88 

Telephones 386.02 550.52 164.50 

Total cost of day and evening 

schools 365,151.93 366,149.21 997.23 

Per capita cost 30.03 29.47 —0.56 

Cost of high school instruc- 
tion 68,029.27 69,084.54 1,055.27 

Per capita cost 43.52 41.82 —1.70 

7. -MISCELLANEOUS. 

1908. 1009. Increase. 

Paid for new school 

buildings $18,271.25 $828.00 —$17,443.25 

Repairs and permanent 

improvements 17,792.21 21,195.13 3,402.92 

Total school expendi- 
tures 401,215.44 388,172.34 —13,043.10 

Valuation of city 63,153,400.00 63,659,201.00 500,801.00 

Number of dollars 

spent to maintain 

schools out of every 

$1,000 of valuation. . 5.78 5.75 —0.03 

Number of dollars 

spent for all school 

purposes out of 

every $1,000 of 

valuation 6.35 6.10 —0.25 

The laws of the state lay upon the School Committee the 
duty of making an annual count of all the children between the 
ages of five and fifteen, and of illiterate minors over fourteen. 
The purpose of this law is to provide a method of ascertaining 
facts which are needed to enable the authorities to know how 
many children there are of compulsory school ages, and how 



154 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

many more there are of school ages not included in the com- 
pulsory attendance period. Last September six persons were 
employed to make the enumeration, and they undertook the 
work with an intention to make the returns trustworthy and 
accurate. It is probable, therefore, that, so far as care in ob- 
taining the information recorded can safeguard against error, 
the figures are approximately true. But there are circum- 
stances entering as elements in the problem which work against 
the securing of entirely reliable returns. The length of the 
period over which the enumerating extends, the uncertainty as 
to the reliability of information given to the enumerators in 
some instances, and the coming to the city after the enumera- 
tor has passed a given locality of new families are such cir- 
cumstances. 

School Registration. The chief service rendered to school 
authorities by the school census is found in the comparison 
which it makes possible between the number of children in the 
city with the enrollment lists of the public schools and the facts 
of attendance in private schools. Turning to the latter record 
for information, it is shown that there were in attendance in 
the public schools on October first 10,768 children between the 
ages of five and fifteen years, 1,775 in the private schools, 
making a total of 12,543. The census report shows 12,419 as 
the number of children between the ages of five and fifteen 
years. The number obtained from the school registers is 124 
in excess of that given by the school census. Correspondence 
between the two records is so close in this instance as to give 
the appearance of reliability to each. Passing to the records 
of children between the ages of seven and fourteen, the com- 
pulsory attendance period, the results are not correspondingly 
satisfactory. According to the school census, there are 9,378 
children of compulsory school age, whereas the number shown 
to be in school is 8,977. If the school census figures are cor- 
rect in this particular, there were on October first 401 
children of compulsory school age who were not actually in 
school. Of this number, there were reported as being out on 
account of sickness 62, which leaves 339 unexplained. It is not 
believed that such a large number of children were evading the 
requirement to attend school. It is probable that the number 
reported by the school census is made over-large by transferring 
to the group of seven to fourteen years children whose ages 
really are in groups bordering that period. The efficiency of 
our enforcement of the attendance law is too great to permit 
so large a number of children of compulsory school age to be 
overlooked. 

School Attendance. The whole number, of pupils enrolled 
in 1909 was 15,363, an increase over last year of 258 pupils. 
The average membership is 12,423, an increase over last year of 
264 pupils, The per cent, of attendance is 93 ? 9 ; that of last 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 155 

year, 94.2. Four thousand four hundred twenty-two cases 
of tardiness were reported, an increase of 540. 

Schoolhouses. The number of schoolhouses has not been 
increased during the year. There are now 26 schoolhouses ; 
of these, the Forster is the oldest, having been in use for 43 
years. The Prescott has been in use 42 years, the Morse 40, 
and the Edgerly 38 years. There are 5 buildings which have 
been in use less than 10 years. Within the last five years addi- 
tions have been made to the Latin High, the Bingham, the 
Brown, and the Hanscom, providing in the high school 8 rooms 
and in the elementary schools 16. In 1899 the average mem- 
bership of 9,502 was accommodated in 219 schoolrooms, with 
43+ to a room ; in 1909 an average membership of 12,423 is 
distributed among 286 rooms, with 43+ to a room. The in- 
crease in average membership during the last year was 264, a 
number sufficient to form six classes of normal size. This in- 
crease has produced in certain sections of the city over-crowd- 
ing of school buildings. 

It has been necessary to crowd children into rooms which 
ought to accommodate a much smaller number, and to use 
hallways for recitation purposes. Certain rooms in basements 
now in use as classrooms are unfit for that purpose, and should 
be abandoned as soon as other provision can be made. This 
over-crowding of accommodations in several schools has led to 
an unsatisfactory classification of pupils and to an increase in 
the cost of their instruction. Relief from these conditions 
should be sought without delay. 

The. most important need of the schools to-day is addi- 
tional room. 

Another condition which should be noted is the rapid in- 
crease of population in West Somerville. There are many new 
houses in process of construction, and it is predicted that 
within the next year many more will be built. In this way 
there will arise a condition which the existing school facilities 
will be inadequate to meet. Some provision for this growth 
should be made before the opportunity to secure the needed 
land is lost. In discussing school accommodations, it is proper 
to take note of the fact that in several school districts it would 
be a wise policy to secure additional land, both for present play- 
ground needs and for future building purposes. The ratio of 
playground space to the number of children in attendance upon 
our schools is small in most instances. In some cases it is ab- 
solutely insufficient. It would be economy, both for present 
and for future well-being, to acquire in the neighborhood of the 
school buildings wherever land adjoining the schools is vacant 
enough additional space to provide adequate playgrounds for 
the children now, and for such future needs as the growfh of 
the neighborhood shall dictate. 



156 ANNUAL KEPOKTS. 

In order to find present relief from the conditions of over- 
crowding noted above, I recommend that portable school- 
houses be purchased. These houses make provision for one 
class each and, as their name implies, they can be moved from 
locality to locality, as need for them makes desirable. Such 
houses could be set up adjacent to several of our school build- 
ings, and thereby provide rooms for pupils now poorly housed. 

During the last year the heating plant of the Highland 
School has been improved by the substitution of a new system, 
making probable a sufficient heating of that building. No 
other marked alteration of the building conditions has been 
made. It is to be hoped that in the near future money will be 
available for altering several of the old buildings, so as to pro- 
vide window space sufficient to remove the necessity of using 
artificial light. This change is entirely practicable, and one 
which consideration of sound financial policy would approve. 
There is now the need for artificial light in a number of school 
buildings which could be entirely overcome if more window 
space were provided. The cost for such a change would in a 
series of years be more than met by the outlay caused by the 
artificial, illumination. There can be no question as to the de- 
sirability of this change from the standpoint of consideration 
for the children. The necessity for artificial illumination of a 
schoolroom is always to be deplored. Such lighting is not sat- 
isfactory, endangers the health of the children, and makes a 
large item of expense. It would seem to be good policy to in- 
augurate a plan for the altering of the older buildings, so as to 
provide a sufficiency of window space. 

During the last year provision has been made for sanitary 
drinking fountains in a number of buildings. The danger from 
the common drinking cup is beginning to be recognized. That 
the public is not more concerned about the prevalence of the 
use of a common drinking cup by school children is probably 
due to the fact that the dangers of such use have not been set 
forth in such way as to command general attention. The Mas- 
sachusetts State Board of Health has recently sent out a cir- 
cular calling attention to the use of a common drinking cup in 
public places as a menace to the health of the community. 
This is in accordance with the best medical view, which regards 
the drinking cup as a source of danger which should be re- 
moved. This is fortunately not a difficult thing now to do. 
There are several devices which can be secured at a small ex- 
pense which provide opportunity for a pupil to get a drink of 
water without the interposition of any cup. Such devices are 
known as the bubble fountain. During the last year bubble 
fountains have been installed in a number of buildings. The 
following table shows where they are placed and how many 
drinking places equipped with cups still remain. These drink- 
ing cups should give way rapidly to the bubble fountain equip- 



SCHOOL DSrAKTMENT. 



IS* 



tnent. Marked advance has been made, however, by the reduc- 
tion of the number of such places, and the hope is held out that 
they will soon disappear: — 



Latin 

English. . . 
Prescott . . . 
Hanscom. . 

Davis 

Bennett. . . 
Baxter. . . . 
Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

Bell 

Cummings 
Edgerly . .. 



Bubble 


Bubble 




Jan.l, 
1909. 


During 

Year. 


Cups. 






9 






15 




2 


1 




2 






2 


2 




3 


1 




2 






2 


8 




2 






2 






2 


1 




2 






2 


4 



Glines . . . 
Forster . . 
Bingham. 

Carr 

Morse. . . . 
Proctor . . 
Durell.... 
Burns .... 
Brown . . . 
Highland 
Hodgkins 
Lincoln . . 
Lowe .... 
Totals.... 



Bubble 


Bubble 


Jan. 1, 


During 


1909. 


Year. 




2 




3 


2 


2 




2 




2 


2 






2 




o 
O 




2 


2 




6 


41 



Cups. 



1 

5 

2 
3 
4 
4 

79 



Changes of Teachers. Our schools have lost the services of 
twenty-two teachers during the last year. Of these, Miss 
Helen Thicker surrendered the office of principal of the Baxter 
School on October 1, after a service in the schools of 
more than thirty-six years. For a long time she continued in 
the work of teaching against the importunities of friends, who 
sought to draw her into a life of leisure and travel. A spirit 
singularly devoted to the interests of the children of the com- 
munity in which she worked forbade her to yield to such en- 
treaties. Her work for the children of the Baxter School was 
in a class by itself. Possessed of generous culture, a mind en- 
larged by travel, a temperament singularly responsive to the 
appeals of childhood, she devoted her time, and strength, and 
affection to the children whose interests were so dear to her. 
Such as she ennoble the teachers' calling. That she may enjoy 
and profit by the leisure which is now hers is the hearty wish 
of those who know the merit of her work. 

Another loss to the schools was occasioned by the call of 
the Unseen Messenger. Miss Charlotte F. Mott, after a lin- 
gering illness, departed from this life February 11, 1909. No 
better memorial of her service can be given than the resolu- 
tions adopted in her memory by the Somerville Teachers' As- 
sociation. These resolutions appear in another place in this 
volume. 

The others left either for the sake of professional advance- 
ment or to assume charge of homes of their own. They were 
men and women who gave freely of their energies and their 
talents to the interests of our schools, and their leaving is a loss 
keenly felt in many personal and official relations. 



104 


—4 


100 


+33 


143 


—16 


156 


+47 



158 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The places so made vacant have not been readily filled. 
The problem of seeking- competent teachers is a difficult one, 
requiring the exercise of care and sometimes the spending of 
much time. It is believed that those who have been elected 
during the last year will all prove to be worthy of the places to 
which they have been called. 

The Latin School. The membership of this school has risen 
from 504 to 570 within the year, an increase of sixty-six, without 
any change in the teaching force. This number is divided 
among the classes as follows: — 

1909. 1908. Change. 

Post-graduate 7 

Senior 100 

Junior 133 

Sophomore 127 

Freshman 203 

With the head master, there are fifteen teachers in the 
school, six of whom are men. Including the principal, who 
teaches two-thirds of the time, the average class unit is thirty- 
three. 

There have been two changes of instructors during the 
year. Miss Gertrude M. Hall, the head of the English depart- 
ment, left the school for professional advancement. Her place 
was taken by Miss Natalie A. Smith, a teacher in the Reading 
high school and a graduate of Wellesley. Miss Mabel E. 
Bowker, who resigned to enter the schools of Boston, was suc- 
ceeded by Miss Kate M. Monro, a graduate of Mt. Holyoke, 
who at the time of her election was a teacher in the high school 
at Biddeford, Me. 

Ninety-one pupils were graduated from the school in June, 
fifty of whom entered college or technical schools. 

The standing of the school among institutions that fit for 
college is unsurpassed. Its graduates take high rank wherever 
they go, and reflect honor not only upon the school and its 
teachers, but upon the city as well. The number pursuing each 
study is shown in the following table : — 

English 572 French 142 

History 336 German 204 

Mathematics 572 Greek 135 

Physics 65 Drawing 30 

Latin 552 Chemistry 19 

The following table shows the extent to which pupils drop 
out of the school during their four-years' course: — 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. 



159 



TABLE SHOWING LOSSES OF CLASSES IN LATIN HIGH SCHOOL EACH YEAR. 





Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Cass 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Membership. 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 




1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


3909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


December 15, 1st year . 


103 


Ill 


125 


121 


136 


139 


124 


162 


156 


203 


2nd " . 


93 


97 


106 


112 


120 


124 


109 


143 


127 




3rd " . 


88 


95 


93 


92 


101 


107 


100 


133 






" 4th " . 


84 


81 


93 


83 


102 


104 


100 








Graduates 


73 


76 


81 


75 


94 


91 


12.1 


11.7 


18.6 




Loss per cent. 1st year 


9.7 


12.6 


15.2 


7.4 


11.8 


10.8 




" |2nd " 


5.4 


2.1 


14.0 


17.9 


15.8 


13.7 


8.2 


1.') 






*' 3rd " 


4.5 


14.7 


0.0 


9.8 


0.0 


2.8 


0.0 








" " 4th " 


13. 1 


6.1 


12.9 


9.6 


7.8 


12.5 










Total 


29.1 


31.5 


35.2 


38.0 


30.9 


34.5 











The English School. One thousand two hundred and 
forty-five pupils have been members of the school since the 
opening of the term in September. Forty-six of these have 
dropped out, leaving at the present time a membership of 1,199, 
thirty-nine more than there were a year ago at this time. 
They are classified as follows : — 

1909. 1903. Change. 

Post-graduate 8 10 —2 

Senior 185 182 +3 

Junior 227 218 +9 

Sophomore 345 309 +36 

Freshman 434 441 — 7 

There are forty-one teachers, exclusive of head master and 
secretary, thirteen of whom are men, three of them being em- 
ployed in the manual training department. The average num- 
ber of pupils to a teacher is twenty-six. 

Five new teachers were added to the corps in September: — 

Cara F. Dillingham, Mt. Holvoke, French and German. 

Roy W. Hatch, Dartmouth, '02, history. 

Frank A. Scott, Harvard, '03, physics. 

Stephen E. Wright, Brown, '06, algebra, geometry, and German. 

Augustus B. Tripp, laboratory assistant. 

The school lost four teachers. 

The following table shows the losses that the school has 
sustained during the last ten years: — 



160 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE SHOWING LOSSES OF CLASSES IN ENGLISH HIQH SCHOOL EACH YEAR. 





Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Membership. 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 




1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


December 15, 1st year 


246 


261 


250 


252 


267 


350 


399 


422 


441 


434 


2nd " 


178 


214 


190 


220 


224 


286 


301 


309 


345 




3rd " 


147 


180 


158 


187 


194 


205 


218 


227 






" 4th " 


112 


148 


140 


162 


164 


182 


185 




... 




Graduates 


106 


135 


127 


148 


141 


174 




... 






Loss per cent, 1st year 


27.2 


18 


24.0 


12.7 


16.1 


18.3 


24.6 


26.8 


21.8 




2nd " 


17.4 


15.9 


16.8 


15.0 


13.4 


28.3 


27.6 


26.5 


. . * 




it it 3rd « 


23.8 


17.8 


11.4 


13.4 


15.5 


11.2 


15.1 




. . . 




" 4th " 


54 


8.7 


9.0 


8.6 


14.0 


4.4 




. 






Total 


56.9 


48.3 


49.2 


41.7 


47.2 


21.7 


... 


... 







In June the school graduated 174. Twelve of these entered 
college, eight, technical schools, and eleven, normal schools. 

The twenty-four subjects of the curriculum are pursued by 
pupils at the present time as follows: — 



English 1,197 

History 909 

Mathematics 853 

Chemistry Ill 

Physics : 109 

Biology 73 

Physiology 203 

Latin 249 

French 446 

German 113 

Physical geography 31 

Mechanical drawing 343 

Freehand drawing 362 



Commercial: — 

Law 12 

Bookkeeping 112 

Stenography 168 

Arithmetic 230 

Geography 46 

Penmanship 325 

Typewriting 186 

Elocution 722 

Manual training 250 

Music 1,137 

General science 378 



Elementary Schools. There are now in these schools 10,931 
pupils, twelve less than a year ago. They are classified as fol- 
lows : — 

1909. 1908. Change. 

Grade 1 1,595 1,572 +23 

" 2 1,404 1,430 —26 

" 3 1,346 1,349 —3 

" 4 1,307 1,307 

" 5 1,249 1,300 —51 

" 6 1,199 1,211 —12 

" 7 1,122 1,138 —16 

" 8 950 865 +85 

9 759 771 —12 

In June last 741 were graduated from the grammar schools, 
sixteen more than last year. Of these, 546, or seventy-four per 
cent., entered the high school, 364 going to the English and 182 
to the Latin. 

During the year we have issued 357 working certificates to 
minors under sixteen, 243 of which have been given to grammar 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



161 



school boys and girls from the five upper grades. None are is- 
sued to those under fourteen. 

Kindergartens. The kindergartens are located in the Hans- 
com, Bennett, Baxter, and Glines Schools. The entire cost of 
these kindergartens for the year was $4,063.44, or $21.50 for 
every child that attended. 

The details are as follows: — 





S 
o 
u 
m 


u 


4) 


10 


Total. 




c 


c 


X 


.2 






a 


pq 


PQ 


O 




Enrollment 


108 


110 


107 


97 


422 


Average membership 


47 


51 


48 


43 


189 


Average attendance 


39 


44 


42 


39 


164 


Per cent, attendance 


83.3 


86.2 


86.3 


92.2 


86.8 


Age 


4—7 


4— G 


4—8 


4—8 


4—7 



Evening Schools. The night schools were opened on the 
first Monday in October, as follows: — 

Evening High School, William D. Sprague, master. 
Prescott Evening, Charles T. Murray, master. 
Bell Evening, John S. Emerson, master. 
Highland Evening, Charles E. Brainard, master. 

The largest of the elementary schools is the one in the 
Bell School. Here the work has peculiar interest because of 
the attendance of many non-English speaking foreigners. Sec- 
tion 17, Chapter 514, Acts of 1909, defines the word "Minor" 
as a person under eighteen years of age. The effect of this defi- 
nition has been to release from the application of compulsory 
attendance at night schools illiterate persons of the ages of 
eighteen to twenty-one years, who heretofore have been com- 
pelled to go to night school. As a consequence, the attendance 
at the Bell evening school has been reduced a fifth. The other 
elementary schools have held their normal attendance. All are 
doing valuable work. 

The evening high school had 751 pupils in November of 
this year as against 691 in November of last year. The follow- 
ing courses are provided: Shorthand and typewriting, book- 
keeping, mechanical drawing, freehand industrial drawing, al- 
gebra, commercial arithmetic, English composition, physics, and 
chemistry. 

The work is all practical, and is adapted to the needs of 
persons who seek to better their preparation for earning a 
living. 

Mr. William D. Sprague, who was elected master of this 
school upon the resignation of George W. Earle, has shown 



i62 ANNUAL EEPOMS. 

power and interest in the management of the school. In his 
hands, with the corps of competent instructors who assist 
him, the school will continue to render most practical and valu- , 
able service. 

Cost of the Schools. The total amount spent for the main- 
tenance of the schools of Somerville in 1909 is $366,149.21. 
This does not include the sums spent on schoolhouse repairs and 
for new buildings. It does cover the amount paid for the care 
of school buildings, for janitors' services, fuel, light, and 
school telephones. This expenditure is wholly in charge of the 
city government. 

The amount paid for janitors is $26,071.97 

The cost of fuel is 14,798.06 

The cost of light is 4,070.71 

The cost of the school telephones is 550.52 

A total of $45,491.26 

The cost per capita 3.66 

The second important expenditure is wholly under the con- 
trol of the Board, and is covered by what is known as the 
"School Contingent" appropriation. The following is the 
itemized account: — 

Officers' salaries $5,629.17 

Books $6,887.09 

Stationery 5,294.54 

Laboratory and manual training sup- 
plies 2,417.55 

Bookkeeping blanks.... 256.24 

Writing books 1.28 

Maps, charts, etc 76.50 

Drawing 872.38 

Typewriters and supplies 523.28 

Printing 1,137.07 

Telephone 204.20 

Kindergarten supplies 275.94 

Express and postage 300.31 

Travel 191.10 

Graduation exercises 845.71 

Bookbinding 986.13 

Board of truants 791.56 

Census 261.02 

Book covers 36.35 

Repairing and tuning pianos 37.50 

Miscellaneous 423.18 

Total for school supplies, etc 21,818.93 

Total outlay on school contingent account.. $27,448.10 

Appropriation 27,000.00 

Deficiency $448.10 

Received for damage to school property, tuition 

of state wards and non-residents, etc 650.56 

Balance $202.46 



SCfiOOL DEPARTMENT. 163 

The third, and by far the largest, element of the cost of 
schools is the sum spent for the salaries of teachers. The fol- 
lowing shows the monthly payments : — 

January $29,825.07 

February 29,997.00 

March 29,442.50 

April 28,418.63 

May 28,475.13 

June 28,428.94 

September 28,560.63 

October 30,454.32 

November 30,181.63 

December 29,426.00 

Total $293,209.85 

Amount of appropriation 295,000.00 

Balance $1,790.15 

Credit 3.50 

$1,793.65 

The estimate of the School Board for teachers' salaries 
amounted to $296,445. The expenditure was $3,235.15 less. 

The total outlay for all school purposes in 1909 was as fol- 
lows : — 

Teachers' salaries $293,209.85 

Administration 5,629.17 

Care of schoolhouses 45,491.26 

School supplies 21,818.93 

Total for school maintenance $366,149.21 

Paid for repairs 21,195.13 

Paid for new buildings 828.00 

Total for all school purposes $388,172.34 

Each dollar of the sum spent for the support of schools has 
been divided in the following proportion: — 

1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 1909. 

Teachers' salaries. .$0,793 $0,792 $0,792 $0,785 $0,792 $0,801 

Administration .... 0.016 0.013 0.016 0.016 0.015 0.015 

Janitors' salaries... 0.070 0.070 0.070 0.070 0.070 0.071 

Heat and light 0.053 0.061 0.052 0.057 0.051 0.052 

School supplies.... 0.068 0.064 0.070 0.072 0.072 0.061 

Total $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 

Per Capita Cost. The proper method of comparison of the 
cost of schools year by year is to consider the sum spent for 
each pupil in the average membership. In this computation 
we exclude the cost of evening schools, the sum being so large 
as possibly to mislead. The following shows 



164 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



THE PER CAPITA COST OF DAY SCHOOLS FOR 190S AND 1909. 





High Schools. 


Grammar and 
Primary Schools. 


All Day Schools. 




1908. 


1909. 


De- 
crease. 


1908. 


1909. 


De- 
crease. 


1908. 


1909. 


De- 
crease. 


Instruction . . . 
Supplies .... 


$43 52 
4 90 

4 85 


$41 82 
4 59 
4 36 


$1 70 
31 
49 


$20 64 
1 71 
3 30 


$20 63 
1 26 
3 38 


$0 03 

45 

-f 08 


$23 58 

2 12 

3 50 


$23 44 
1 70 
3 51 


14 
42 

+0 01 


Total .... 


$53 27 


$50 77 


$2 50 


$25 65 


$25 27 


$0 38 


$29 20 


$28 65 


$0 55 



Including the cost of maintenance of evening schools, the 
per capita cost will be as follows: — 

1906. 1907. 1908. 1909. 

Cost of instruction $22.63 $22.93 $24.21 $24.06 

Cost of supplies 1.92 2.04 2.17 1.76 

Cost of care 3.45 3.65 3.65 3.66 

Total $28.00 $28.62 $30.03 $29.48 

An examination of these tables shows that we have paid 
$1.70 less for the instruction of each pupil in the high school 
than in 1908, and thirty-one cents less per pupil for supplies. 

The grammar and primary schools have cost one cent less 
per pupil for instruction, and forty-five cents for supplies. 

The decrease in the per capita cost of instruction is due to 
changes in the teaching corps of the high and elementary 
schools. The schedule of salaries provides a yearly increase to 
such teachers as have not reached the maximum of their classes. 
The effect of this schedule is to raise the cost of instruction 
year by year until all teachers arrive at the maximum salary, 
when a level cost will be reached. This tendency can be off- 
set by the employment of new teachers at a salary less than the 
maximum of their classes or less than that of the teachers whose 
places they take. A number of the teachers who resigned dur- 
ing the year were receiving the maximum salary, but their suc- 
cessors were engaged at salaries lower in the scale. The total 
saving in salaries by this process was enough to make the de- 
crease in per capita cost noted. 

There are several points in this matter significant enough 
to merit attention. The first is that an effort has been made by 
the Committee to spend in a careful, business-like way the 
money granted to it by the Board of Aldermen. Without 
sacrificing efficiency in any way avoidable, and with no willing- 
ness to sacrifice it, the Committee, nevertheless, has so attended 
to its duty in this particular as to make the best use of the city's 
money. 

A second point is just as significant. The teachers who 
have resigned at maximum salaries have gone to larger salaries 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. 



165 



elsewhere. They had served Somerville at the highest salaries 
available to them, but they were worth more, and could not be 
held by our scale. The teaching of this experience is that our 
maximum salaries are not too large. Those who come to us at 
lower than those salaries do so only because the attainable 
maximum is as large as it is. When they have reached it they, 
too, may move on. The maximum salaries are the determin- 
ing values in getting and keeping good teachers. With cer- 
tainty of reaching by length of service and by merit a maximum 
that is satisfactory, desirable teachers can be secured who are 
content to begin at salaries lower than that maximum. 

The last point to be made is that it is plain that our salaries 
are not higher than are needed to provide for our schools the 
quality of instruction which they are now receiving, and which 
the standards of the city demand. 

Considering all day schools together, the cost per capita 
has decreased fifty-five cents, resulting from a decrease of four- 
teen cents for instruction and forty-two for supplies, with an 
increase of one cent in the cost of the care of school buildings. 
Adding the cost of evening schools to that of day schools, we 
increase the cost of instruction by sixty-two cents, the cost of 
supplies six cents, and the cost of the care of school buildings 
fifteen cents. This makes the total cost for 1909 $29.48 per 
capita, as against $30.03 for 1908. In 1907 there were eighty- 
nine cities and towns in the Commonwealth in which the per 
capita cost was larger than it was in Somerville. The cost of 
maintaining our schools in 1908 was $5.78 for every thousand 
dollars of the city's valuation, but there were seventy-eight cities 
and towns in the state that paid a higher rate. This year the 
maintenance of the schools in Somerville has taken $5.75 of the 
$12 allowed for the maintenance of all departments in the city. 

Teachers* Salaries. The salaries paid to teachers in Janu- 
ary, 1910, are as follows : — 



1 man $3,000 

1 man 2,800 

1 man 2,000 

1 man 1,950 

11 men, 2 women 1,900 

8 men 1,700 

1 man 1,600 

3 men 1,500 

2 men 1,400 

4 men 1,300 

2 women 1,200 

1 woman 1,150 

1 man 1,100 

12 women 1,000 

5 women 950 

20 women 900 

} woman. .............. 8§0 



1 woman $825 

1 woman, 1 man 800 

16 women 775 

1 woman 750 

7 women 725 

203 women 700 

5 women 650 

10 women 600 

1 woman 550 

4 women 525 

5 women 500 

10 women 425 

1 woman 400 

3 women 350 

1 woman 275 

3 women, 1 man...... 2QQ 



166 ANNUAL KEPOKTS. 

Truancy. The truancy for the year amounted to 780 half- 
days, being 76 half-days more than the record of 704 half-days 
last year. 

This is not an undue amount of truancy. Teachers and 
principals have been vigilant, and have co-operated in every 
way possible with the truant officer in the effort to prevent 
pupils being out of school improperly, and to detect such tru- 
ancy as might occur. 

Taken with the good average of attendance for the year, 
there is afforded a test of the efficiency of the schools, so far as 
attendance is concerned. The record is no lower than normal, 
and is probably somewhat better than that. 

The following shows the record for the year : — 

1908. 1909. Increase. 

Number of visits to schools.. 401 787 386 

Number of cases investigated 655 1,185 530 

Number found to be truants 155 265 110 

Number sent to the truant school 6 2 — 4 

Paid for board of truants $705 $791 ^86 

The 265 cases of truancy were caused by 201 individuals. 
Nine hundred and twenty cases investigated were found to be 
absences for which reasons satisfactory to the truant officer 
were given. Two hundred and eighty-four were out on ac- 
count of illness. 

While these cases furnished a large part of the work for 
the truant officer, and were apparently not of a nature to de- 
mand his services, it is probable that his visits to these homes 
promoted the attendance of children upon whose parents the 
obligations to send their children to school rests rather lightly. 
Six pupils were brought into court for sentence as truants. 
Two were sent to the truant school, and four released on pro- 
bation. 

Of the 201 truants, five were attendants of the high schools. 

School Hygiene. The physical welfare of pupils has been 
kept prominent in the minds of school officers and teachers 
during the year. More efforts than ever have been made to 
secure good ventilation and to keep the temperature of rooms 
at a degree which the best authorities and our Rules and Regu- 
lations declare as a standard. A beginning of the banishment 
of the drinking cup for common use has been made, and added 
attention has been given to the relation of schoolroom lighting 
to the activities of pupils. The recess for all pupils in the 
morning and for primary pupils in the afternoon has been re- 
established. In most schools the recesses are held out of 
doors in suitable weather. 

The eye and ear tests have been held as described in the 
last report, yielding results shown in the following tables. 
These tests, while lacking anything like expert quality, are 
nevertheless productive of much good. There is need of some 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



167 



method of assuring attention to remedying such defects as the 
tests disclose. As it is, many ascertained defects continue be- 
cause parents do not provide suitable treatment. 

The following gives the results of the eye and ear test : — 

EYES. 

' 1908. 1909. Change. 

Tested 11,429 11,417 —12 

Defective 2,307 2,200 —107 

Per cent, defective 20.2 19.2 —1.0 

Notices sent to parents 1,406 1,375 

Professionally treated 350 185 

EARS. 

1908. 1909. Change. 

Tested 11,854 11,890 +36 

Defective 496 371 —125 

Per cent, defective 4.2 3.1 — 1.1 

Notices sent to parents 331 284 

Professionally treated 34 35 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. 

At the September meeting, upon a motion by Mayor 
Woods, the School Committee passed an order directing the 
Committee on Industrial Education to take into consideration 
the whole question of industrial education and to report at the 
December meeting. In compliance with this order, a careful 
examination has been made of the status and tendencies of the 
movement for industrial education. Information upon the 
subject has been sought by means of a study of published re- 
ports, addresses, and discussions upon industrial education, by 
conferences with leaders in this movement, and by visiting 
schools where an effort is being made to provide this form of 
training. The time prescribed by the order of the Board for 
making this investigation has not been sufficient to permit an 
examination of a number of institutions whose experiments in 
this field of educational effort are of interest and value ; the 
voices of speakers and writers upon this subject when clear 
have not been found always to be in unison, and the beginnings 
already made in various parts of the state differ greatly in plans 
and means used to provide industrial training ; but, in spite of 
these limitations and contradictory conditions, it is possible to 
present a few conclusions with a degree of assurance that they 
represent fairly the trend of thought of educators upon this 
subject. 

It has been sought in this investigation to find such an- 
swers to a few questions as would afford the School Committee 
adequate reasons for its guidance in determining what it should 
recommend for the schools of Somerville. The questions for 
which answers have been sought follow :— 



168 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

1. What is the demand for industrial education? 

2. How is the need to be met? 

3. What should be done now to provide industrial train- 
ing in the schools of Somerville? 

1. Briefly stated, the demand for industrial education 
arises from the conviction that the old courses of instruction 
fail to fit for life a large proportion of the youth attending 
school. The curriculum of the elementary schools has been 
based upon the three R's of historic and honorable distinction. 
To be able to read, write, and do sums was for the youth a 
generation ago a preparation sufficient to enable him to enter 
some activity which would provide means of support. While 
the study of reading, writing, and arithmetic was then no more 
than now vocational in motive, its relative value as training for 
self-support was greater in former days than it is now. This 
change of value has come, not because it is less important to- 
day than formerly to be able to read, and write, and cipher, for 
it is vastly more important to-day to be able to do these things 
well, but because the marvelous changes in the conditions of 
living which have occurred in a comparatively few years have 
greatly impaired the potency as a preparation for earning a 
livelihood of that training of which the three R's were the prin- 
cipal factors. Moreover this training has never been equally 
effective for all pupils. The registers of the schools are bur- 
dened with the records of pupils whose attainments in book- 
learning have been mediocre. Such pupils have had little rea- 
son to expect to pass through the "door of opportunity" which 
stands invitingly open at the end of the literary courses. Hav- 
ing little aptitude for literary (cultural) courses, upon reaching 
the age when school attendance is no longer compulsory, they 
drop out of school to go to work, or, if they continue for a time 
longer, they do so with little advantage to themselves or satis- 
faction to the school. Others more successful at their books 
pursue one or another of the courses provided because of lack 
of opportunity to select one which leads to industrial life. It 
is urged with vigor that the needs of these pupils should be met 
by adding to the public school establishment such courses, 
agencies, and equipments as are required for a training which 
will give preparation for earning a living by means of a manual 
occupation. This in brief is the educational demand. 

The educational demand is strongly supported and re- 
inforced by the demands of employers of skilled labor that public 
instruction shall furnish as thorough preparation for the indus- 
tries as it is giving for business and the professions. Em- 
ployers assert that the supply of skilled labor is not equal to the 
demand, that the number of skilled workmen coming to this 
country from abroad is small, that the apprenticeship plan has 
failed largely and conditions are rapidly growing worse. 

And finally, organized labor demands that "the boys and 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 169 

girls of the country have an opportunity to acquire educated 
hands and brains, such as may enable them to earn a living in a 
self-selected vocation, and acquire an intelligent understanding 
of the duties of good citizenship." The report of the convention 
of the American Federation of Labor held in Toronto last No- 
vember from which this quotation is taken goes on to say, "The 
one trouble of America to-day is that too many of our youths 
who have graduated from the grammar or high school are 
misfits industrially. If we are to secure industrial supremacy, 
or even maintain our present standards in the industrial world, 
we must in some way in our educational system acquire an 
equivalent to our old apprenticeship system." Also "We favor 
the establishment of schools in connection with the public 
school system, at which pupils between the ages of fourteen 
and sixteen may be taught the principles of the trades, not 
necessarily in separate buildings, but in separate schools adapted 
to this particular education and by competent and trained 
teachers." 

These demands for a new order of educational effort have 
been taken by many as an attack upon the conduct of public 
education in the past and as an impeachment of the efficiency 
of that education. And there are not wanting those who hasten 
to resent the attack by stout denial of the claims for an educa- 
tion designed to promote industrial efficiency. That the old 
courses have given splendid vocational training for youths des- 
tined to enter professional, business, school, or scientific 
careers, can not be successfully questioned. That "industrial 
misfits" are also the products of that system is attested by the 
statements of employers and labor unions, and by the statistics 
of the schools themselves. That one sort of training is adapted 
to the needs of one part of the school attendance does not pre- 
clude the idea that another kind is needed for another part. 
Nor does the setting up of a course of instruction for new 
needs or needs newly recognized necessarily condemn that al- 
ready established so far as it is successfully accomplishing its 
purpose. 

2. Having indicated the grounds on which the claims for 
industrial education rest, the answer to these claims is to be 
sought. Here again, as in the first inquiry, confusion and con- 
tradiction abound. Volumes of discussion and theory are 
available for the bewilderment of the searcher for light who 
trusts solely to such aid. P^ortunately, however, experiments 
have been undertaken in varied ways and in a number of places, 
each throwing a faint beam upon the problem, and the whole 
number when properly focused affording considerable illumi- 
nation for its solution. In extent, full provision for industrial 
education would parallel the upper grammar school grades, 
the high school, and the college, ranging in quality from ele* 
mentary preparatory work, through intensive trade instrUQ* 



170 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

tion in a selected occupation, to schools or colleges for training 
foremen or superintendents. To satisfy the broad educational 
view, the matter of most consequence is to give suitable oppor- 
tunities for training to those who must at the beginning be of 
the rank and file of industrial workers. Such an opportunity 
should of necessity be open to those in the elementary schools 
who intend to work at manual trades, or who would otherwise 
leave school upon reaching fourteen years of age. It should 
be open to youth of high school age and qualifications, whether 
or not they have had elementary industrial instruction. 

Two kinds of effort have already been started which serve to 
illustrate methods by which advance in this new undertaking may 
be made. Of these, the first is the so-called "extension plan" 
or the Cincinnati University plan. As adopted in Fitchburg, 
this plan has excited wide interest and attention. Boys who 
take this course spend half their time in the high school and a 
half in a machine shop or other metal-working establishment. 
Their high school instruction is outlined to supply the teach- 
ing which is needed for that line of work. The shop work is 
conducted under the same conditions as surround regular work- 
men and is subjected to the same requirements. Here the boy 
learns methods and processes of making the articles produced 
in the shop and at the end of his course of four years he will be 
a skilled workman. During his course he receives pay for his 
work at the rate of ten to twelve and one-half cents an hour 
for labor in the shop. This plan is working satisfactorily to 
all persons concerned and has many admirable features. 
Wherever and to whatever extent it is possible, it has the dis- 
tinguishing feature of being financially attractive : to the city, 
which pays nothing for it ; to the boy, who gets pay while get- 
ting an education ; to the manufacturer, who gets good return 
for his money and interest in the boy. That a plan so benign 
and advantageous to all concerned has not universally been 
adopted, is sufficient evidence of limitations to its application as 
a solution of the problem. Indeed, Fitchburg itself recognizes 
this limitation and is moving to provide training in manual arts 
for boys and girls in the seventh and eighth grades of grammar 
schools in a separate building provided by the state as a part of 
the state normal school. The pupils get the training and the 
normal school pupils give the training. 

The second general plan for providing industrial training 
is worked out through schools created for the purpose. The 
place for holding such a school may be a building or part of one 
converted from some other to this use, or it may be a building 
constructed for this purpose ; its equipment is determined by 
the trades to be taught ; its course of study is industrial in mo- 
tive, and its instructors are persons trained in the pursuits 
which they teach. Schools of this kind exist in a number of 
places, An independent industrial school was established last 



SCHOOL DEPAETMENT. 171 

September in New Bedford. Vocational work in two centres 
was started in the same month in Springfield. 

A secondary industrial school established a few years ago 
as a part of the public school system of Columbus, Ga., has at- 
tracted favorable notice because of its successful working and 
adaptation to the needs of the community which supports it. 
Requirements for admission are sound bodies, fourteen years 
of age, and education in common-school studies through the 
sixth grade of the elementary schools. Its sessions continue 
throughout the year, with the exception of the month of 
August. The school hours are from 8 to 4 daily, excepting 
Saturday. Every course extends over three full years. Aca- 
demic work is required of boys and girls, in addition to which 
the boys are taught carpentry, pattern-making, machinist's 
trade, cotton-mill work, and business pursuits ; the girls, dress- 
making, millinery, and business training. While successfully 
fulfilling its purpose in preparing pupils for industrial pursuits, 
its enrollment does not increase as rapidly as the school 
authorities desire, a fact due in part, at least, to the unusual 
length of the session and daily school hours. A new school 
building was provided for this enterprise, towards the cost of 
which the city government gave $30,000, and four gentlemen 
$21,000. The site for the school, consisting of two and one- 
half acres, was presented by two more public-spirited citizens. 
It is at present possible to teach all the trades selected under 
one roof, but whenever the demand for instruction in any one 
trade increases to an extent to justify the change, a separate 
building will be provided for instruction in that trade. A pri- 
mary industrial school had been in operation for four years in 
this city before the secondary school was established. 

Industrial schools have been established in several other 
cities, corresponding in plan to one or another of these already 
described. All have one element in common, namely, an ex- 
perimental quality. Motive and certain definitions of condi- 
tions for entrance and continuance in these schools are well set 
foith, but the extent of the applicability of this educational ef- 
fort and what are to be its complete component parts are mat- 
ters which are not laid down as yet by competent authority. 

One more phase of this movement should receive mention. 
Evening industrial schools to provide training for day workers 
have been established in a number of neighboring cities. They 
form an important part in a comprehensive scheme, but it is 
not necessary to describe them further in this connection. 

As a conclusion to this part of the discussion reference 
must be made to the status of industrial education as a part 
of the educational policy of the state of Massachusetts. During 
the last session of the state legislature a new educational organ- 
ization was established superseding those then existing. The 
executive officer of the State Board is a commissioner of edu- 



178 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

cation who is to have two assistants, called deputy commis- 
sioners. Of these one. is to be in charge of the work of pro- 
moting and establishing industrial education in the state. A 
most important provision of the law concerning the establish- 
ment of industrial training is found in Acts and Resolves, 1906, 
Chapter 505, Section 5 (amended, 1909, Chapter 51:0). 

Upon certification by the Board of Education to the 
auditor of the Commonwealth that a city, town, or district, 
either by moneys raised by local taxation or by moneys donated 
or contributed, has maintained an independent industrial 
school, the Commonwealth, in order to aid in the maintenance 
of such schools, shall pay annually from the treasur}- to such 
cities, towns, or districts a sum equal to one-half the sum raised 
by local taxation for this purpose : Provided, that no payment to 
any city or town shall be made except by special appropriation 
by the legislature. 

Another provision of the law which is not generally under- 
stood in its full significance is Section 4 of Chapter 572 of the 
Acts of 1908, as follows: — 

Any resident of Massachusetts may, with the approval of 
the commission on industrial education, attend an independent 
industrial school, as provided for in this act, located in any city 
or town other than that in which he resides, provided there is 
no such school supported in whole or in part by the city or town 
in which he resides, upon payment by the city or town of his 
residence of such tuition fee as may be fixed by said commis- 
sion ; and the commonwealth shall repay to any city or town 
ore-half of all such payments. If any city or town neglects or 
refuses to pay for such tuition, it shall be liable therefor, in an 
action of contract, to the legally constituted authorities of the 
school which the pupil attended under the approval of said 
commission. 

By this section cities and towns which do not support an 
independent industrial school may be compelled to pay the 
tuition of such of its residents as may, with the approval of the 
commission on industrial education, attend such a school located 
in any city or town other than that in which he resides. Six 
girls who live in Somerville are now in attendance at the Trade 
School for Girls in the city of Boston under the provisions of 
this section and bills for their tuition have been presented to the 
city of Somerville. It is apparent that anyone of our residents 
who has qualifications to satisfy the State Board of Education 
can obtain admission to an independent industrial school and 
require the city of Somerville to pay tuition therefor. Indus- 
trial education, therefore, is no longer merely a proposition to 
be considered, but is an established condition for some, at least. 

3. Concerning the Needs of Somerville for Industrial 
Education. — Three views of the need of industrial education 
have now been considered, It has been seen that each view 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 173 

gives prominence to a presentation which is characteristic of 
the interest affected. Manufacturers demand greater efficiency 
in the graduates of the schools. Organized labor demands an 
education for industrial efficiency. Education is concerned in 
developing in each individual his highest possibilities, in leading 
him from the bondage of ignorance to the liberty of conscious 
power, which is life. Educating the individual and giving him 
industrial training are not two unrelated processes, separate, 
distinct, and mutually suspicious. Industrial education is a 
part of a whole, which is the education of the individual himself. 
But although these views are differently expressed and present 
different reasons for their demands, a common ground among 
them can be found in the claim that education in industrial 
knowledge and skill is needed for many as a preparation for 
earning a living, which, of necessity, is their most imperative 
activity. Over the question whether education may properly 
have as one of its aims preparation for earning a livelihood, 
there is now little need of lingering. The multiplied demands 
of society and the vocational courses already established as 
parts of the system of public education make such a discussion 
of little more than academic interest. Therefore, the demands 
that a training for industrial efficiency should be provided for 
those whose lives shall be spent in productive pursuits are logi- 
cal and founded upon sound educational and economic policy. 
It is sound educational doctrine to fit a child for life and its en- 
vironment. It is sound economic policy to increase the value 
of a youth to society by fitting him to render his maximum ser- 
vice to society. At present there is provided for all good in- 
struction in the intellectual arts, essential alike as the founda- 
tion of professional, business, and industrial pursuits, but suffi- 
cient training of eye and hand is not given by the school or by 
the home life of most city children to prepare them to enter any 
of the industrial occupations with a prospect of success. 
Manual training is a beginning for such training, but as gener- 
ally conducted is void of vocational motive, and consequently 
not a method for securing a vocational end. Other agencies, 
then, must be provided if this purpose is to be realized. What 
those agencies should be is determined by the character of the 
community and the number and the needs of pupils for whom 
provision is to be made. 

It has already been pointed out that pupils for whom such 
provision is demanded are of two classes, — those in the ele- 
mentary schools who leave school as soon as they are fourteen, 
and those who continue into the high school only to take 
courses for which they are unfitted. For our schools the num- 
ber of the former can be ascertained, but that of the latter is 
somewhat conjectural. During the year 1909 age and school- 
ing certificates were issued from the office of the Superintend- 
ent of Schools permitting 179 boys and 178 girls to go to work. 



174 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



The places into which they went are shown in the following 
taoie i 



Manufac- 
turing 
Estab- 
lishments 



Stores 



Miscel- 
laneous 



Boys. Girls. 

Confectionery 3 52 

Jewelry 4 jg 

Soap Works 4 

Rubber n ig 

Box 1 4 

Union Glass Co Q 

Machine 8 

-{Crackers 1 5 

Library Bureau 2 

Shoes 1 2 

Publishing house 1 

Preserve 10 

Printing 4 

Derby Desk 3 

Electric Co 3 

[Miscellaneous 10 7 

rGrocery 15 3 

I Department \ 19 37 

■i Drug 2 

j Fruit 3 

[ Miscellaneous 18 3 

Postal Telegraph Cable Co 6 

Teaming 2 

Squire's and North's 13 1 

Lunch 1 1 

Barber 1 

Wood and coal 3 

Millinery 1 

Laundry 1 



Unknown 37 



Total .' 179 



14 



178 



From this statement it will be seen that many sought em- 
ployment outside of Somerville, and most of them in occupa- 
tions requiring little skill and offering but small opportunities 
for life employment. The children have chosen to go to work 
in places yielding small immediate rewards, with no prospect 
of advancement and with no value as means for providing life 
careers. They have chosen to leave school for a contest with 
the problems of life, and have begun their struggle poorly pre- 
pared. To keep such children in school until they shall be bet- 
ter prepared for beginning to earn a living is important to them 
and to the community. 

The number of pupils now attending the Somerville High 
School who would be better suited by courses leading to indus- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 175 

trial occupations is unknown, but is susceptible of some ap- 
proximate ascertainment. It is a matter of great importance, 
both in its bearing upon the question of what should be done 
to provide new opportunities for our youth and upon the prob- 
lem of the development of the high schools. The development 
of these schools along the lines of their present activities is ar- 
rested by the limitations set by buildings now greatly over- 
crowded. 

Should plans for providing industrial training and for giv- 
ing relief from overcrowded conditions in the high schools 
coincide? 

It has been shown that provision for industrial training 
may be made in city schools under three different forms, 
namely, evening industrial schools, schools or courses parallel 
to existing high schools in which intensive work in trade in- 
struction may be given, and by courses for the upper grades of 
the elementary schools intended to lead directly to the sec- 
ondary school. 

In our evening high school a good beginning has al- 
ready been made. Very few additional courses would be re- 
quired to make it in name as well as in fact an evening indus- 
trial school. For the intermediate and elementary industrial 
schools we have no provision. For them courses of study, 
equipment, accommodations, and maintenance are required. 
The law of organizing these courses of work should be devel- 
opment from small beginnings through experiment and experi- 
ence to the full measure of need. 

To summarize, the following statements are made : — 

1. Provision for industrial education as a part of the 
school system is desirable. 

2. Such provision should be made by courses in evening 
industrial classes (schools), intermediate classes, and elementary 
classes. 

3. Boys and girls should be included in plans for indus- 
trial education. 

4. While the extension or Cincinnati University plan 
should be used so far as practicable, suitable accommodations 
in addition to those now available are indispensable to the ac- 
complishment of this work. 

5. Such courses should be given for specialized work in 
the intermediate school as would meet the most widespread 
need. Such need should be determined by reference to the 
present and prospective industries of Somerville, and to the oc- 
cupations in neighboring cities which furnish employment to 
our youth. 

6. In the evening industrial and in the intermediate school 
"literary" instruction should be combined with practice in 
trades, or shop work. 



176 ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

7. In the elementary industrial school a larger part of the 
time should be given to manual work, and the "literary" work 
should be stimulated by interest in industrial geography, his- 
tory, etc. 

Manual Training. Two advanced steps have been taken in 
this- subject this year, the first in the appointment of a super- 
visor, and the second in providing knife work in wood for boys 
of the sixth and seventh grades. 

The importance of the first step lies in the fact that an ex- 
pert in manual training is provided to supervise the work as a 
whole in the grade and high schools. In organizing the work, 
in planning courses for the several grades, in assisting and ad- 
vising teachers, he will exert a stimulating and helpful influence 
upon all those engaged in this department. It may be con- 
fidently expected that, under his direction, with the able assist- 
ance of the teachers, this work will develop in interest, plan, 
and results. To the position of supervisor the School Board 
elected Frederick O. Smith, the head of the department of 
manual training in the English High School. 

Knife work was introduced in the sixth and seventh grades 
as manual occupation for boys during the period when the 
girls of those classes were to be engaged in sewing. A graded 
course of simple models was prepared for each grade, and 
wood and certain tools were provided. Knives the boys are 
expected to furnish. Working drawings and simple directions 
are furnished for each model, and the grade teacher is given 
charge of the work. Some anxiety was shown by the teachers 
when they first approached the new subject, caused by their 
fear that they might not be able to do the work well. But 
under the helpful guidance of the supervisor they have mas- 
tered the initial difficulties, and are working bravely and with 
increasing confidence. They report that the boys like to do 
the whittling, and are greatly interested in it. Moreover, some 
say that they have gotten a fresh and better hold upon a num- 
ber of boys by means of this exercise. It is desired that 
teachers assume as little directive control over the boys' work 
as is compatible with its progress. One of the aims of this 
work is to give a boy a chance to do something himself, to de- 
pend upon himself, even to learn through failures how to do 
better. As the work is not formal, is not to be made a basis of 
marking anybody, either boy or teacher, it is hoped that an op- 
portunity will be provided for individuality to assert itself, some 
independent power to be displayed, and for teachers and boys 
to acquire a new social relation. The courses for this work 
appear in the appendix. ' 

High School Accommodations. The passing of another 

year has brought no improvement in the conditions which 
have been the cause of complaint at the high schools. In- 
creased attendance has made more difficult than ever the task 
of providing a seat for every pupil. That this task has been 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. 177 

performs is in itself a deceptive accomplishment. If every 
pupil has a seat, why is there not room enough? may be asked 
with some degree of plausibility. The answer is, of course, 
that to provide a seat for every pupil is by no means to pro- 
vide all that a modern high school ought to give to its students. 
An additional answer is that a seat for every pupil has been 
furnished only by using for study rooms many places that were 
not intended for that purpose, and which are not fit to be put to 
that use. Pupils are occupying rooms which have been con- 
demned by the medical inspectors as deficient in ventilation and 
air supply. Bad as this condition is, there is much more to say. 
The deprivations which are a consequence of this over-crowd- 
ing include some of the most vital and characteristic features 
of a high school. Assembly hall, gymnasium, and adequate 
recitation rooms, to say nothing about space in which to de- 
velop any new line of work, all these are missing. While the 
assembly hall in the Latin School answers many purposes and 
is used as much as possible, it does not meet the requirements 
of either school. As these facts are well known to the Com- 
mittee, and have been set forth for the information of the pub- 
lic in minute detail in previous reports, it does not appear 
necessary or desirable to repeat the details here. But it is 
necessary strongly to re-affirm the statement that the high 
school problem awaits settlement, and that it is a question of 
prime importance. That the development of the high schools 
is intimately associated with that other large measure discussed 
in this report, industrial education, seems apparent. Whatever 
policy shall be adopted in the establishment of schools for in- 
dustrial education, it cannot be inaugurated without reference 
to high school needs. Both problems should be included in 
the survey, and their inter-relations ascertained. Action 
should comprehend and provide for both needs. As the case 
stands now, it is probable that it will be necessary to consider 
the possibility of extended sessions for the high schools next 
year, in order to get relief from some of the unsatisfactory con- 
ditions which attend the present arrangements and to provide 
room for more pupils. 

In order that the School Committee may know what would 
be the effect upon the membership of the high schools of estab- 
lishing an industrial school, I recommend that an inquiry be 
made among ninth-grade and high school pupils to find out 
how many would be likely to enter an industrial school. In 
the meantime it seems desirable to suspend for the present urg- 
ing an enlargement of the present high school plants. The 
need of relief there is clearly defined, and there is no danger 
that it will be lost to sight because for the present the School 
Board is willing to move carefully in advocating expenditure 
of public money. 

The Length of the Elementary Course. It is a well-known 
fact that there is a difference in the practice of communities in 



178 ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

prescribing the limits of their courses for primary and gram- 
mar schools. In some places, as in our city, children are al- 
lowed to enter the first grade at the age of five, and have before 
them a course of nine years below the high school. In others 
the course is eight years, the age of beginners, being five years 
in some cases, in others being six years. 

Outside of the New England states, the eight-years' 
course, with six years as the age for beginners, is generally the 
custom. That the course of nine years, with an entrance age 
of five years, is of merit superior to that of the course of eight 
years, with an entrance age of six years, no competent 
authority asserts. There is now a movement in Massachusetts 
cities towards the shorter course. As the experience of many 
school systems gives evidence of the sufficiency of the eight- 
years' course, it would seem that the nine-years' course must 
be justified by some purpose or practice which it makes pos- 
sible and which the shorter course would not. For instance, if 
it is thought best to admit to the first grade all children five 
years old, and to determine the length of the course to fit that 
condition, there is strong argument for the longer course. So 
it would be, also, if it were desired by the longer course to give 
more time for the work, without much thought of other consid- 
erations, or to introduce unusual studies or occupations into 
the curriculum. Such treatment of the matter would afford 
some justification of the nine-years' course as against one of 
eight years. But when money, school accommodations, and 
the length of time children can spend in school must be taken 
into account, it is a fair question whether there is sufficient jus- 
tification for the longer course to warrant its continuance. 

As has been pointed out already, many of our buildings 
are over-crowded, and in some we are forced to use rooms 
which we would gladly abandon. An urgent plea for more 
room has been made without success, and we are confronted 
with a condition which calls for remedial action. A change 
from the nine-year course to one of eight years, and from an 
entrance age of five years to one of six years, would so reduce 
the number of pupils to be accommodated as to give all the 
relief that is required in most cases. Such a change is justifi- 
able, if not demanded, by educational reasons, and as a mat- 
ter of economy it deserves our consideration at the present 
time. The School Committee cannot provide school buildings 
to suit its needs, but it can determine the wisdom of maintain- 
ing the longer course of instruction, which gives more pupils 
to care for at one time than its school buildings will accom- 
modate. 

Therefore I recommend that the School Committee con- 
sider whether the efforts of the city to provide the best educa- 
tion for its children and to make a careful use of its money 
would not be helped by a change to the eight-year elementary 
course. As a closing remark upon this topic, I quote from the 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 179 

Annual Report of the Massachusetts Board of Education, 1907- 
1908 : "If the division line between the grammar school and 
high school remains as it is, an eight-year primary and gram- 
mar course, beginning with children six years of age, seems, 
fair and reasonable." 

School Efficiency. An animated discussion has taken 
place among educational writers during the last year as to what 
constitutes school efficiency and how it is to be determined. 
Most interesting tables have been compiled from the statistics 
of school reports to show what is being accomplished in various 
cities. Some rather startling deficiencies in school statistics 
have been exposed. It has been attempted to measure school 
efficiency in terms of the number of beginners in the first grade 
who persist to the final grade; of the number who progress 
without repeating a grade, etc. An exhaustive study of this 
subject, made by Leonard P. Ayres, as a publication of the 
Russell Sage Foundation, has attracted wide attention. This 
work includes the schools of Somerville among the number 
examined and used in its classifications. On page 5 occurs 
this sentence: "The computations show that in the schools of 
Somerville a little more than six per cent, of the children are 
repeaters. From this figure the records of the cities range 
upwards until we reach Camden, N. J., with thirty per cent, of 
the children in the repeating class." On page 96 is a table 
showing the number and cost of repeaters in fifty-five cities. 
Somerville heads the list with the lowest percentage of re- 
peaters. In other places our city has honorable mention. But 
a careful study of this book would fail of reaching the chief 
value which it ought to bestow if only a feeling of complacency 
were its result. Just the contrary should be its effect, a deter- 
mined scrutiny of conditions to ascertain wherein the effi- 
ciency of the schools can be increased. In the appendix are 
given some interesting tables prepared with this purpose in 
mind. 

Before the end of this school year I propose to make a 
study of the problem of retardation in all grades of our schools, 
and to present the results thereof to the School Board soon 
after the summer vacation. 

Conclusion. I would be glad to speak at length of the 
work of the schools and of the services of the teachers, did time 
and space permit. But I must commend, though briefly, the 
loyal devotion of the rank and file of the teachers and of all the 
officers to their work and to the interest of the schools. From 
them all I have received unfailing support. To the School 
Committee I give expression of hearty appreciation of their 
personal encouragement, and of the many hours of care and 
thought they have given in many unheralded ways. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles S. Clark. 
December 31, 1909. 



180 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



By vote of the Board at the meeting held May 24, 1909, the 
following was ordered spread upon the minutes : — 

Mrs. Henrietta B. H. Attwood, a member of the School Board, 
passed from this life on the twenty-first day of May, after an illness of 
thirty-six hours. On Wednesday evening she attended a meeting of 
the Committee on Text-Books and Courses of Study in City Hall 
Annex. The first member to arrive, she was apparently in the best of 
health. As the members assembled, she conversed brightly with one 
and another, and her flashes of wit and genial repartee contributed 
much pleasantry to the meeting. Her interest in the proceedings of 
the meeting was keen and unremitted. Upon several occasions she 
spoke, commanding the closest attention by the value of her informa- 
tion and the weight of her opinions. After adjournment she lingered, 
still conversing cheerfully. Several members had already departed, 
when, in attempting to rise from her chair,, Mrs. Attwood was stricken 
with the illness from which she was never to rally. She was borne to 
her home, and soon lapsed into unconsciousness, and passed away on 
Friday morning. 

Her last work was performed in behalf of the schools, her last ex- 
pression of thought was made in the rooms of the School Committee. 
Her last words were concerning her husband, whose coming she was 
awaiting when the fatal illness fell upon her. 

Mrs. Attwood was born in Maine., where in early life she was a 
teacher. In 1876, with her husband, she came to Somerville to live. 
Elected to the School Board in 1898, she has served continuously as 
a member of that body, and was at her death the oldest in point of 
service. She was active and influential, and was devoted to the inter- 
ests of the schools, being thoroughly acquainted with those of her dis- 
trict. She was chairman of the Music Committee, and member of the 
Committee on Industrial Education, on Text-Books and Courses of 
Study, and on Vacation Schools. 

To her energy, integrity, and constant care for the interests of the 
schools this Committee bears testimony; to her high character, strong 
sense of personal duty and personal responsibility, to her many 
womanly interests, it gives tribute of respect; to the friend and asso- 
ciate of many years it bids the long farewell. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 181 



The Somerville Teachers' Association spreads on its rec- 
ords this expression of its loss in the death of Miss Charlotte 
F. Mott, for years a teacher in the Lincoln School : — 

She was a woman of sweet Christian character and high 
ideals, a rare soul who will live in the memory of her pupils 
and her friends. 



m 



IS? AKXUAL RBPOKTS. 

ORGANIZATION OF SOnERMLLE SCHOOLS, 



Information concerning- our schools is frequently sought 
by citizens or by educators in other localities. Following are 
'the principal facts concerning them: — 

Kindergartens. The city supports four kindergartens, in 
the Hanscom. Bennett, Baxter, and Glines Schools. Vac- 
cinated children between four and rive years of age are ad- 
mitted to the kindergarten nearest their residence during the 
months of September and April, and may remain until the July 
following their fifth birthday. Sessions from 9 to 11.45. 

Head kindergartners receive $600. One trained assistant 
is allowed when the number exceeds thirty, at a salary of 8*375. 
8350. or 8-1 '2 5. according to experience. Kindergarten teachers 
give rive hours daily to their work, the afternoon being em- 
ployed in visitation, preparation, mothers' meetings, and the 
like. 

Primary Schools. Our elementary school course covers 
nine years, the first three of which are spent in primary schools. 
We have one exclusively primary school building, the ninety- 
three primary classes being distributed among twenty-three 
schoolhouses. 

Vaccinated children five years of age, or who will reach 
that age on or before the first day of October, are admitted 
during the month of September only, provided they have never 
attended school before. Children able to enter existing classes 
will be admitted at any time. Applications for admission 
should be made to the principal of the school. 

Only trained or experienced teachers are emploved. the 
salaries being 8300. 8375. 8450. 8525, 8000, 8050, or $700, ac- 
cording to length of service. Normal training is equivalent to 
a year's experience, and experience in other places may be 
counted in determining salary. 

Teachers of any grade, with classes numbering fifty, are 
allowed an assistant at the option of District Committees, who 
is paid 8200. $275, 8350. or $425, according to years of service. 

Grammar Schools. The grammar grades are found chiefly 
in twelve large buildings, of twelve or more rooms each. The 
course covers six years, and includes only those studies which 
the statute requires, with the addition of music, sewing, elemen- 
tary science, and sloyd manual training in the four upper 
grades. 

The salaries of grammar school teachers are the same as 
those of primary teachers. Masters are paid 81.900, and their 
assistants $775. Other ninth-grade teachers are paid $725. 
Principals of smaller schools receive $775, $825, $900, $950, or 
$1,000, 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



183 



Promotions. Promotions in all grades, from the first to the 
thirteenth, are made in June by the regular teacher and the 
principal, with the approval of the Superintendent and District 
Committee. They are based on the estimate of the pupil's 
daily work made by the teacher and recorded bi-monthly. An 
occasional brief, unannounced, written test is a factor in this 
estimate. 

Where there is reasonable doubt of a student's fitness, he 
may be promoted on a trial of three months. In such cases the 
parent is notified and kept informed of his child's progress. At 
the end of this probationary period he may be returned to his 
former grade, provided it seems for his interests. In 1909 ten 
per cent, of those promoted on trial fell back. 

Children capable of more rapid advancement may be pro- 
moted one or more grades at any time. Twenty-seven were 
thus promoted in 1909. 

Fitness for graduation or for admission to the high schools 
is determined in precisely the same way. Diplomas are given 
in grammar and high schools to those who have satisfactorily 
completed full courses. 

Latin High School. In September, 1895, in the forty-third 
year of its existence, the Somerville High School was divided, 
the classical, or college preparatory, departments remaining in 
the old building, erected in 1872, and the English departments 
occupying a new building, erected in 1894-'95. 

Some facts concerning the Latin School are presented in 
the following table : — 



School Year. 


Average 
Number 


Number 


Gradu- 


Cost of 


Per Capita 


S2 

V 

X. 
o 


Pupils to 




Belonging. 


Entering. 


ates. 


Instruction. 


Cost. 


rt 
a 

H 


Teacher. 


1895-6 


257 


09 


50 


$11,702 


$45.57 


9 


28.6 


1890-7 


202 


81 


51 


11,840 


45.19 


9 


29.1 


1897-8 


273 


80 


55 


11,921 


43.07 


9 


30.3 


1898-9 


204 


78 


51 


11,935 


45.21 


9 


29.3 


1899-0 


245 


05 


48 


12,491 


50.98 


9 


27.2 


1900-1 


271 


104 


50 


12,070 


40.74 


9 


30.0 


1901-2 


314 


114 


50 


12,583 


40.13 


10 


31.4 


1902-3 


358 


125 


40 


14,170 


39.58 


11 


32.5 


1903-4 


398 


122 


73 


10,104 


40.40 


13 


30.6 


1904-5 


411 


L38 


70 


10,500 


40.31 


13 


31.0 


1905-0 


431 


135 


83 


10,991 


39.42 


14 


30.8 


1900-7 


425 


122 


75 


19,243 


45.20 


15 


28.5 


1907-8 


471 


100 


94 


19,003 


41 .79 


15 


31.4 


1908-9 


494 


158 


91 


20,403 


41.27 


15 


33.0 



The object of the school is, primarily, to furnish a suitable 
preparation for those pupils who desire to pursue either a regu- 
lar or a special course of study at higher institutions of learn* 



184 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ing, but the school is open to all pupils who wish to take the 
courses of study offered. 

The regular time for completing the course is four years. 
Pupils, at the request of their parents, can make the work of 
each year easier by taking five years for the course. Those 
who are capable, and have good reason for shortening the time 
of preparation, are allowed to complete the course in as short 
a time as their ability will permit. 

Graduates of grammar schools are admitted to either high 
school on presenting a certificate of qualification signed by a 
master. All other pupils are admitted by an examination in 
grammar school studies, given usually on the day preceding the 
opening of the schools in September. 

The tuition for non-residents is the per capita cost for the 
year, payable in advance. The sessions of the school are from 
8.30 to 1.30. The salaries paid high school teachers range 
from $900 to $1,200 for women and from $1,000 to $3,000 for 
men. 

English High School. This school was organized in Sep- 
tember, 1895. Information concerning it is found in the follow- 
ing table : — 



School Year. 


Average 

Number 

Belonging. 


Number 
Entering. 


Gradu- 
ates. 


Cost of 
Instruction. 


Per Capita 
Cost. 


u 
1) 
■JS 
u 

u 

H 


Pupils to a 
Teacher. 


1895-6 


456 


213 


67 


$20,102 


$44.13 


21 


21.7 


1896-7 


531 


235 


70 


23,010 


43.33 


21 


25.3 


1897-8 


535 


224 


75 


24,843 


46.44 


22 


24.3 


1898-9 


575 


231 


86 


26,159 


45.49 


23 


25.0 


1899-0 


669 


316 


83 


31,322 


46.82 


27 


24.8 


1900-1 


691 


249 


97 


32,739 


47.35 


30 


23.0 


1901-2 


738 


294 


108 


35,989 


48.74 


34 


21.7 


1902-3 


747 


264 


135 


36,843 


49.32 


33 


22.6 


1903-4 


728 


264 


106 


36,426 


50.04 


33 


22.1 


1904-5 


784 


339 


135 


39,634 


50.56 


33 


23.8 


1905-6 


893 


378 


127 


39,823 


44.60 


35 


25.5 


1906-7 


994 


402 


148 


42,862 


43.12 


39 


25.5 


1907-8 


1,060 


457 


141 


47,228 


44.55 


42 


25.2 


1908-9 


1,122 


476 


174 


48,682 


43.38 


43 


260 



The course of study covers four years. Graduates are ad- 
mitted to special courses when the conditions are favorable. 
Candidates for technical and normal schools take specific pre- 
paratory work. 

Concerning admission, sessions, etc., see Latin School. 

A simple, healthful, inexpensive lunch is served at the r§' 
cess midway of the session to pupils desiring it. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 185 

Manual Training. Three rooms are fitted and equipped in 
the basement of the English High School for its manual train- 
ing department. The course includes carpentry, wood-turning, 
and carving, clay modeling, pattern making, moulding, and 
casting. A fourth room is devoted to mechanical drawing, 
with a full course. Manual training has been extended to in- 
clude the eighth and ninth grades in the grammar schools, two 
centres having been established with twenty-five sloyd benches 
each. 

The men in charge of the manual training department are 
paid $1,800, $1,400, $1,300, and $1,100. 

Sewing. Sewing is taught to the girls in the fifth, sixth, 
seventh, and eighth grammar grades in weekly lessons of about 
one hour each. 

Four special teachers are employed, three at salaries of 
$700, and one at $550. 

Music. Instruction in music is given exclusively in the 
high schools and in part in the three upper grammar grades by 
a specialist, who is paid $1,700. The books used are "The 
Euterpean," 'The Cecilian Series of Music and Song," Nos. 
1, 2, 3, and 4, "The Laurel Song Book," and the "Laurel Music 
Reader." 

In the six lower grades musical instruction is given by the 
regular grade teacher, under the supervision of a specialist, 
who visits each class once every fifteen days. She is paid 
$1,000. The Normal System of Music, with its books and 
charts, is used. 

Gymnastics. In elementary grades the Ling system of 
Swedish gymnastics is practiced daily. No special teacher is 
employed. 

Recesses. The Latin School has two brief recesses, break- 
ing the daily sessions into thirds. The English School has a 
seven-minute recess after the second period and an eighteen- 
minute recess after the fourth period. 

The elementary schools have a recess of ten minutes mid- 
way of the morning session. The first three grades of the ele- 
mentary schools have a recess of seven minutes midway of the 
afternoon session, which may also be given in the higher grades 
at the discretion of the principal. 

No detention of pupils is allowed at noon or at recess, and 
but a half-hour's detention at the close of the afternoon session, 
"for wilful neglect of duty only." 

Corporal Punishment. Corporal punishment, "which in- 
cludes any infliction of physical pain or application of physical 
force," is not prohibited. It must, however, not be adminis- 
tered until twenty-four hours after the offence, the approval of 
the principal being first obtained, Each case must be reported 



186 ANNUAL EEPOETS. 

in detail to the Superintendent. There were 326 cases in 1906, 
314 in 1907, 318 in 1908, and 292 in 1909. 

Drawing. Two teachers of drawing are employed in the 
English H^igh School at salaries of $1,000 and $900. In that 
school freehand drawing is compulsory for first-year pupils, 
and elective for all others. Drawing is not taught in the Latin 
School. A few Latin School pupils take drawing in the Eng- 
lish School. 

In the primary grades daily lessons, and in the grammar 
grades semi-weekly lessons are given by the regular teacher, 
under the direction of a supervisor, who visits each class once a 
month, and is paid $1,000. 

The course includes pictorial drawing from nature, models, 
and objects; structural drawing from type solids; decorative 
drawing, designing, and color work, historic ornament and 
picture-study. No drawing books are used. Colored crayons 
are provided in primary grades, and water-colors and brush in 
grammar grades. 

Penmanship. Intermedial slant writing is taught in the 
elementary schools, the Whitehouse system being used. The 
supervisor visits each class once in four weeks, and receives 
$1,500. 

Cadet Teachers. Provision has been made for the employ- 
ment in the elementary schools of not exceeding twelve "Cadet 
teachers," at a salary of $200 each. Three such teachers are at 
work at the present time. 

The Public Library. The English School has a working 
library of 1,700 volumes, but it draws constantly on the public 
library, located in an adjoining building. 

For many years there has been a constant use of the li- 
brary by school children. One hundred and sixty-five circulat- 
ing libraries of fresh books are in use in the smaller buildings. 
As far as they can, the teachers guide in the selection of books 
by the children, and the librarian and his assistants cheerfully 
render all the help in their power. 

Evening Schools. An evening high school is maintained in 
the English High School building on three evenings a week, 
from 7.30 to 9.30. The principal is paid $6, and his assistants 
$4, $3, $2, and $1.50. Any high school study, and freehand and 
mechanical drawing, may be pursued. 

Elementary evening schools are open in the Prescott, Bell, 
and Highland buildings from October 1 on four evenings a 
week, from 7.30 to 9.30. The length of the term is dependent 
on the interest and attendance. The course of study followed 
is that prescribed by the Statutes. Principals receive $3 or $4, 
and assistants $2, $1.50, or $1 each evening. 

Truants. The city employs one active truant officer, who 
is paid $1,350, Truants are sent to the county truant school at 






SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 187 

North Chelmsford. There are now fifteen truants from Som- 
erville in the school. 

Janitors. These important officers are appointed by the 
Commissioner of Public Buildings, and are under his direction 
and that of the school principal. 

Supervision. The Superintendent of Schools is the execu- 
tive officer of the Board, and upon him devolves the general 
management of the schools under its direction. He serves as 
the secretary of the Board and as supply agent. His salary is 
$3,000, and he is allowed two clerks, who receive $750 and $600. 
His office is in the City Hall Annex, and his hours are from 4 
to 5 each school day, and from 8 to 9 on Saturday. His office 
is open from 8 to 5 on school days, and from 8 to 10 on Sat- 
urdays. 

The meetings of the School Board are held on the last 
Monday evening of each month, except July, August, and De- 
cember, at 8.15 o'clock. 






188 ANNUAL EEPOETS. 



SOMERVILLE TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION. 

OFFICERS, 1909. 

President, Charles S. Clark. 

Vice-President, George I. Bowden. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Emma F. Schuch. 

Executive Committee: — 

Superintendent Charles S. Clark, ex-officio. 

William D. Sprague, Latin High. Mary E. Richardson, Edgerly. 

A. Marion Merrill, English High. Ellen A. Boynton, Glines. 

Samuel A. Johnson, Prescott. Cora J. Demond, Forster. 

Elizabeth M. Collins, Hanscom. Elizabeth J. Mooney, Bingham. 

Jennie A. Drew, Davis. Charles G. Ham, Carr. 

Katherine Pike, Clark Bennett. Alice B. Hazelton, Morse. 

Etta R. Holden, Baxter. Abbie A. Gurney, Proctor. 

Annie E. Robinson, Knapp. Minnie S. Turner, Burns. 

Irene Vincent, Perry. Cora F. Wpodward, Morse. 

Florence A. Chaney, Pope. Catherine A. Burden, Hodgkins. 

Angeline Cann, Cummings. May E. Small, Lowe. 

The meetings held under the auspices of this association 
were as follows : — 

February 10 — Herman H.Horne, Ph.D., professor of philosophy at 
Dartmouth College. Subject: "The Pedagogy of Herbart." 

March 15 — Don Carlos Ellis, United States Forest Service. Subject: 
"The Conservation of Our Natural Resources." 

April 21 — "A Campaign for Boys," John E. Gunckel, Miss Jane Day, 
Leonard P. Ayres. 

November 5 — Paul H. Hanus, LL.D., professor of history and art of 
teaching in Harvard University. Subject: "An Efficient Educa- 
tion." 

December 6 — Captain Donald B. MacMillan, first assistant to Com- 
mander Peary. Subject: "With Peary in the Arctic." 

December 14 — Dr. Richard C. Maclaurin, president of Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. Subject: "The Motive of Educational 
Effort." 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 189 



50MERVILLE TEACHERS , CLUB. 



OFFICERS, 1909. 

President, Miss A. Marion Merrill. 

Miss Minnie S. Turner, 
Miss Catherine E. Sweeney. 

Recording Secretary, Miss Abigail P. Hazelton. 

Corresponding Secretary, Miss Sarah E. Pray. 



Vice-Presidents, i 



OBJECT. 

The object shall be to secure a close union among the 
women teachers in Somerville ; to promote the spirit of mutual 
helpfulness ; to advance professional interests ; to create a 
deeper sense of the dignity of the profession ; to unite the inter- 
ests of home and school. 

PROQRAnriE. 

January 12 — Lecture, "Appreciation of Music," Professor John Patten 
Marshall. Illustrated on the piano by Mr. Marshall. 

February 10 — Guest night. Organ recital, with soprano solos. J. Al- 
bert Watson, organist; Mrs. Edward Macey, soprano. Readings, 
Mrs. Laura E. Richards. Selections from her own works. Re- 
ception, supper, and dancing. 

March 3 — Address, "Some Phases of a Girl's Education," Miss Mary E. 
Woolley, president of Mount Holyoke College. Soprano solo, 
Mrs. Alice Bowditch Hopkins. Miss Calla Wilson, accompanist. 

March 10 — Lecture, "Walt Whitman," Thomas A. Watson, with selec- 
tions from his poems. Piano solos, Miss Edith Jones. 

April 13 — Address, "On the Trail of Jason," Rev. Thomas Van Ness. 
Violin solo, Mrs. De Lewandowsky. Miss Irene Osborne, ac- 
companist. 

October 12 — Musicale. Reception to officers. 

November 9 — Lecture, "The Brontes," Leon H. Vincent. 

December 14 — Monologues, Adeline S. Joyce. } 



190 



ANNUAL BBPdtttfS. 



CONTENTS OF APPENDIX. 



Concerning Finance. 

No. of Table 

1. Schedule of school property i 

2. Cost of maintaining schools, 1909 

3. Cost per capita of maintaining schools, 1909 

4. Cost of maintaining schools for a series of years 

5. Cost per capita for maintaining schools for a series of years 

6. Amount spent annually for new school buildings and for re- 

pairs for a series of years 

Concerning Pupils. 

7. Population and school census 

8. Attendance, etc., of the schools for 1909 

9. Statistics of the high schools, for school year 1908-1909 

10. Pupils by grades, December, 1909 

11. Separate statistics for grammar and primary schools, 1909 

12. Admissions to first grade in September 

13. Number of grammar school graduates, 1909 

14. Truant statistics 

15. Evening school statistics, 1908-1909 

16. Grammar school graduates for a series of years 

17. Attendance statistics of all schools for a series of years 

18. Statistics of the high school for a series of years 

19. Promotions, 1909 



20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 

24. 



Concerning Teachers. 

Resignations of teachers, 1909 

Teachers elected in 1909 

Leave of absence of teachers 

Transfers of teachers 

Number of teachers employed for a series of years 



25 

26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Miscellaneous. 

Changes in text-books, 1909 

High school graduation exercises, 1909 

Grammar school graduation exercises, 1909 

Organization of school board for 1909 

Teachers in service January, 1909 

Officers in service January, 1909 

School janitors 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



191 



TABLE 1.— SCHOOLHOUSES. 







M 

S 








■d 
ti 








o 
o 




Valuation, 


"3 


3 








u 
n 


Size of 




Xi 


(O 






Name. 


M 

u 


Lot. 


including 


a 

a 
J3 


c3 


Enlargements. 






o 




Furniture. 


£ 


o 








d 

al3 








6 

38 




1 


Latin High . . . 




$91,500 


1871 


8 rooms added 1906 


2 


English High . . 


bl9 




137,600 


1895 


14 




S 


Prescott .... 


12 


22,000 


66,250 


1867 


42 




4 


Knapp 


13 


24,517 


50,340 


1889 


20 


4 rooms added 1894 


5 


Pope 


12 


27,236 


80,860 


1891 


18 




6 


Bell 


12 


22,262 


45,340 


1874 


35 




7 


Edgerly .... 


12 


24,000 


44,250 


1871 


38 


( 4 rooms added 1882 
| 4 rooms added 1892 


8 


Glines 


14 


28,800 


80,800 


1891 


18 


5 rooms added 1896 


9 


Forster .... 


18 


30,632 


85,350 


1866 


43 


6 rooms added 1899 


10 


Bingham .... 


16 


35,586 


60,000 


1886 


23 


j 4 rooms added 1894 
j 8 rooms added 1904 


11 


Carr 


17 


20,450 


53,800 


1898 


11 




12 


Morse 


12 


29,000 


48,200 


1869 


40 


6 rooms added 1890 


13 


Highland . . . 


12 


23,260 


60,560 


1880 


29 


4 rooms added 1891 


14 


Hodgkins . . . 


14 


35,034 


71,550 


1896 


13 




15 


Bennett .... 


12 


17,000 


59,248 


1902 


7 




16 


Hanscom . . . 


10 


12,756 


72,840 


1897 


12 


4 rooms added 1907 


17 


Brown .... 


10 


20,093 


64,701 


1901 


8 


4 rooms added 1907 


18 


Proctor .... 


9 


18,000 


41,029 


1905 


5 




19 


Burns 


8 


16,080 


34,700 


1886 


23 


4 rooms added 1899 


20 


Lowe 


8 


21,650 


51,826 


1903 


6 




21 


Baxter .... 


6 


11,000 


32,956 


1901 


8 




22 


Perry 


6 


46,080 


37,000 


1899 


9 




23 


Davis 


4 


30,155 


22,720 


1884 


25 




24 


Cummings . . . 


4 


11,300 


11,920 


1884 


25 




25 


Durell 


4 


13,883 


19,720 


1894 


15 




26 


Lincoln .... 


4 


17,662 


18,220 


1885 


24 






Total . . . 


281 




$1,443,280 





•• 





(a) Besides a recitation room, a physical laboratory, two teachers' rooms, an assembly hall, a 
library and a principal's office. 

(b) A chemical, a physical, a biological laboratory, seven recitation rooms, a lecture hall, two 
drawing rooms, two teachers' rooms, library, and principal's office. Four manual training rooms 
and lunch room in basement. The biological laboratory and the lecture hall furnish three class- 
rooms. 



192 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 2.— COST OF MAINTAINING SCHOOLS, 1909. 



Schools. 


Teachers. 


Care. 


Supplies. 


Total. 


Latin High . 


$20,402 86 


$2,882 67 


$1,738 09 


$25,023 62 


English High 




48,681 68 


4,320 36 


5,841 81 


58,843 85 


Prescott 




11,110 82 


1,717 70 


586 87 


13,415 39 


Knapp . 






12,065 97 


1,578 74 


779 45 


14,424 16 


Pope 






11,357 00 


1,706 46 


714 11 


13,777 57 


Bell 






11,204 48 


1,464 39 


869 33 


13,538 20 


Edgerly 






11,391 97 


1,462 88 


813 49 


13,668 34 


Glines . 






12,286 73 


2,059 85 


556 94 


14,903 52 


Forster . 






15,683 57 


3,417 31 


848 02 


19.948 90 


Bingham 






14,296 39 


2,001 52 


962 83 


17,260 74 


Carr 






14,833 61 


2,025 49 


1,010 27 


17,869 37 


Morse 






11,527 95 


1,591 59 


1,001 61 


14,121 15 


Brown . 






9,419 12 


1,455 74 


683 57 


11,558 43 


Highland 






11,285 82 


1,820 60 


704 22 


13,810 64 


Hodgkins 






13,599 97 


1,651 50 


842 84 


16,094 31 


Bennett 






10,363 14 


1,591 72 


431 29 


12,386 15 


Hanscom 






8,565 77 


1,675 56 


408 15 


10,649 48 


Proctor . 






6,946 56 


1,250 39 


243 95 


8,440 90 


Burns . 






6,544 66 


1,197 20 


370 37 


8,112 23 


Lowe 






6,609 74 


1,143 25 


377 50 


8,130 49 


Baxter . 






5,457 28 


990 82 


267 50 


6,715 60 


Perry- 






5,183 81 


1,123 87 


345 36 


6,653 04 


Davis 






2,977 07 


963 55 


154 46 


4,095 08 


Cummings 






3,059 32 


924 58 


231 36 


4,215 26 


Durell . 






2,995 96 


821 35 


142 89 


3,960 20 


Lincoln . 






3,403 57 


788 30 


251 02 


4,442 89 


Evening 






7,584 20 


1,863 87 


641 63 


10,089 70 


Totals . . . 


$298,839 02 


$45,491 26 


$21,818 93 


$366,149 21 



SCHOOL DEPABTMENT. 



193 



TABLE 3.— PER CAPITA COST OF flAINTAINING SCHOOLS, 1909. 



Schools. 


Teachers. 


Care. 


Supplies. 


Total. 


Latin High . 


$39 09 


$5 52 


$3 33 


$47 94 


English High 




43 08 


3 82 


5 17 


52 07 


Prescott 




22 63 


3 51 


1 20 


27 39 


Knapp . 






20 84 


2 73 


1 35 


24 92 


Pope 






22 36 


3 36 


1 41 


27 13 


Bell 






22 28 


2 91 


1 73 


26 92 


Edgerly 


• 




22 65 


2 91 


1 62 


27 18 


Glines 






22 34 


3 75 


1 01 


27 10 


Forster 






20 64 


4 50 


1 12 


26 26 


Bingham 






20 19 


2 83 


1 36 


24 38 


Carr 






19 47 


2 Q6 


1 33 


23 46 


Morse 






22 17 


3 06 


1 93 


27 16 


Brown 






20 66 


3 19 


1 50 


25 35 


Highland 






21 33 


3 44 


1 33 


26 10 


Hodgkins 






20 96 


2 54 


1 30 


24 80 


Bennett 






21 15 


3 25 


88 


25 28 


Hanscom . 






20 01 


3 91 


95 


24 87 


Proctor 






20 61 


3 71 


72 


25 04 


Burns 






19 08 


3 49 


1 08 


23 65 


Lowe 


, 




17 63 


3 05 


1 01 


21 69 


Baxter 






18 95 


3 44 


93 


23 32 


Perry 






18 06 


3 92 


1 20 


23 18 


Davis 






18 26 


5 91 


95 


25 12 


Cummings . 






19|49 


5 89 


1 47 


26 85 


Durell 






17|12 


4 69 


82 


22 63 


Lincoln 






16 J3 


3 74 


1 19 


21 06 


High Schools 


$41 82 


$4 36 


$4 59 


$50 77 


Gram, and primary . 


21 33 


3 55 


1 32 


26 20 


All schools 


24 06 


3 66 


1 76 


29 48 


Gram, and prim, with- 










out evening schools 


20 63 


3 38 


1 26 


25 27 


All schools without 










evening schools 


23 44 


3 51 


1 70 


28 65 



194 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 4. — ANNUAL COST OF HAINTAINING THE SCHOOLS 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 

Amounts are given to the nearest dollar and include what has been paid for 
maintaining day and evening schools of all grades. 





Average 


Instruction 


Water 










Year. 


Member- 


and 


and 


Heating. 


Janitors. 


School 


Total. 




ship. 


Supervision. 


Light. 






Supplies. 




1886 


4,985 


$83,542 


624 


$4,929 


$4,194 


$6,676 


$99,865 


1887 


5,198 


86,713 


765 


6,475 


5,084 


7,526 


106,563 


1888 


5,488 


88,967 


953 


7,121 


5,892 


7,421 


110,354 


1889 


5,956 


96,466 


805 


6,081 


6,448 


9,903 


119,703 


1890 


6,486 


104,184 


1,004 


5,586 


7,539 


10,371 


128,684 


1891 


6,502 


114,066 


1,047 


8,032 


8,544 


13,899 


145,588 


1892 


7,035 


124,232 


1,064 


7,148 


9,794 


12,944 


155,183 


1893 


7,217 


128,720 


1,014 


8,312 


10,160 


10,137 


158,333 


1894 


7,212 


132,919 


958 


9,673 


10,686 


10,919 


165,155 


1895 


7,617 


144,113 


1,398 


8,796 


11,581 


15,063 


180,951 


1896 


8,077 


161,551 


1,469 


9,962 


14,160 


17,601 


204,743 


1897 


8,589 


180,222 


1,920 


10,065 


16,251 


14,815 


223,273 


1898 


9,085 


189,244 


2,075 


9,767 


17,393 


14,986 


233,465 


1899 


9,502 


197,660 


2,472 


10,821 


17,831 


16,131 


244,915 


1900 


9,823 


212,863 


1,729 


10,840 


19,236 


15.735 


260,403 


1901 


9,991 


226,556 


1,731 


13,723 


20,078 


18,707 


280,796 


1902 


10,402 


234,210 


1,803 


10,489 


20,859 


19,386 


286,747 


1903 


10,719 


242,964 


2,015 


18,052 


21,042 


20,873 


304,946 


1904 


11,094 


255,481 


1,436 


15,315 


22,024 


21,648* 


315,904 


1905 


11,543 


259,597 


4,345 


15,167 


21,949 


20,619* 


321,677 


1906 


11,762 


266,197 


2,875 


14,162 


23,143 


22,969* 


329,346 


1907 


11,909 


273,107 


3,760 


15,236 


23,999 


24,750* 


340,852 


1908 


12,159 


294,400 


3,831 


14,912 


25,245 


26,763* 


365,151 


1909 


12,423 


298,839 


4,071 


14,798 


26,072 


22,369 


366,149 



♦Including cost of telephones. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



195 



TABLE 5.— ANNUAL COST PER CAPITA OF MAINTAINING 

SCHOOLS 



FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 
[ Based on the average membership. ] 















Ratio of 




Instruction 


Janitors, 


School 






Cost of 


Ybar. 


and 


Water, 


Supply 


Total. 


Assessors' Valua- 


School Main- 




Supervision. 


Heat, and 
Light. 


Expenses. 




tion of City. 


tenance to 
Valuation. 


1886 


$16 76 


•$1 94 


$1 34 


$20 03 


$26,003,200 


.00384 


1887 


16 68 


2 37 


1 45 


20 50 


27,469,300 


.00388 


1888 


16 21 


2 54 


1 36 


20 11 


28,756,400 


.00384 


1889 


16 20 


2 24 


1 66 


20 10 


30,004,600 


.00399 


1890 


16 06 


2 18 


1 60 


19 84 


32,557,500 


.00395 


1891 


17 54 


2 71 


2 14 


22 39 


36,843,400 


.00395 


1892 


17 66 


2 56 


1 84 


22 06 


38,093,100 


.00407 


1893 


17 84 


2 70 


1 40 


21 94 


41,773,600 


.00379 


1894 


18 43 


2 96 


1 51 


22 90 


44,142,900 


.00374 


1895 


18 92 


2 86 


1 98 


23 76 


46.506,300 


.00390 


1896 


20 00 


3 17 


2 18 


25 35 


49,013,050 


.00418 


1897 


20 98 


3 29 


1 73 


26 00 


50,173,775 


.00444 


1898 


20 83 


3 22 


1 65 


25 70 


50,739,700 


.00460 


1899 


20 80 


3 28 


1 70 


25 78 


51,202,350 


.00478 


1900 


21 67 


3 24 


1 60 


26 51 


52,513,400 


.00496 


1901 


22 67 


3 56 


1 87 


28 10 


53,924,200 


.00521 


1902 


22 52 


3 19 


1 86 


27 57. 


55,485,370 


.00517 


1903 


22 67 


3 84 


1 95 


28 46 


56,981,360 


.00535 


1904 


23 03 


3 52 


1 93 


28 48 


58,056,700 


.00544 


1905 


22 50 


3 63 


1 74 


27 87 


59,146,600 


.00544 


1906 


22 63 


3 45 


1 92 


28 00 


60,371,500 


.00546 


1907 


22 93 


3 65 


2 04 


28 62 


61,527,750 


.00554 


1908 


24 21 


3 65 


2 17 


30 03 


63,158,400 


.00578 


1909 


24 06 


3 66 


1 76 


29 48 


63,659,210 


.00575 



196 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 6. — AMOUNT SPENT ANNUALLY 

PURPOSES 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



FOR ALL SCHOOL 



Year. 


For New 


For Repairs and 
Permanent 


For Maintaining 


Amount Spent 
for all 




Schoolhouses. 


Improvements. 


Schools. 


School Purposes. 


1886 


$15,515 


$8,706 


$99,865 


$114,086 


1887 


14,839 


13,636 


106,563 


135,038 


1888 


4,996 


13,994 


110,354 


129,344 


1889 


20,167 


14,225 


119,703 


154,095 


1890 


75,775 


19,168 


128,684 


223,627 


1891 


84,902 


14,847 • 


145,588 


245,337 


1892 


12,679 


17,734 


155,183 


176,001 


1833 


22,809 


12,440 


158,333 


193,582 


1894 


82,206 


44,764 


165,155 


292,125 


1895 


87,680 


15,651 


180,951 


284,282 


1896 


61,016 


33,240 


204,743 


298,999 


1897 


46,621 


20,507 


223,273 


290,400 


1898 


49,983 


21,274 


233,465 


304,722 


1899 


72,516 


15,637 


244,915 


333,068 


1900 


51,232 


21,745 


260,403 


333,380 


1901 


49,203 


11,000 


280,796 


340,999 


1902 


56,501 


13,079 


286,747 


356,327 


1903 


59,822 


12,261 


304,946 


377.029 


1904 


23,703 


18,209 


315,904 


357,816 


1905 


51,987 


8,306 


321,677 


381,970 


1906 


38.457 


11,951 


329,346 


379,754 


1907 


31,804 


18,008 


340,852 


390,664 


1908 


18,271 


17,792 


365,151 


401,214 


1909 


828 


21,195 


366,149 


388,172 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



197 



TABLE 7 POPULATION AND SCHOOL CENSUS. 



1842 . 


. 1,013 


1885 . 


. 29,992 


1905 . 


. 69,272 


1850 . 


. 3,540 


1890 . 


. 40,117 


1906 . 


. 70,875 


1860 . 


. 8,025 


1895 . 


. 52,200 


1907 . 


. 72,000 


1865 . 


. 9,366 


1900 . 


. 61,643 


1908 . 


. 75,500 


1870 . 


. 14,693 


1901 . 


. 63,000 


1909 . 


. 75,500 


1875 . 


. 21,594 


1902 . 


. 65,273 






1880 . 


. 24,985 


1903 . 


. 67,500 







School Census. 

No. of children between 5 and 15 years of age October 1, 



Wardl 
Ward 2 
Ward 3 
Ward 4 
Ward 5 
Ward 6 
Ward 7 

Total 



In public schools 
In private schools 
Out of school 

Total . 



1908. 


1909. 


Change. 


2,068 


1,997 


—71 


2,443 


2,764 


+ 321 


1,055 


1,050 


—5 


1,036 


986 


—50 


1,989 


1,964 


—25 


2,073 


2,082 


+9 


1,553 


1,576 


+ 23 


. 12,217 


12,419 


+202 


. 10,715 


10,768 


+ 53 


1,648 


1,775 


+ 127 


455 


315 


—140 



12,818 



12,858 



+ 40 



Number of compulsory school age, 7 to 14 



According to census, males 
females 

In public schools, males 
females 

In private schools, males 

females . 



Total in school 



Number of illiterate minors 
Children under 7 out of school 

" between 7 and 14 out on account of sicjcness 

" 14 years old at work . 
Total number out of school f . , 





1909. 




. 


4,686 




• 


4,692 


9,378 


3,884 






3,828 


7,712 




438 






827 


1,265 




• 




8,977 


• 


• 


20 
153 


sicjcness 


62 


m 


. ( 


80 


: 


f i 


295; 



198 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 8. — ATTENDANCE OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 1909. 



-o 












a 


a 


o 


.22 * 

S. £ 
« E 








u 

4> U 

to = 


~ s 


bo 


to . 

.a <u 


**.S 
5s c^ 


w 4» 

8-S 


Schools. 


3 E 

c o 


U 4) 

<E 


< 


U C 

4) ~ 


4) 3 

6 


c E 

Z 41 
•" O 

<£ 4) 


o g 

O £ 4) 

« m 4» 

SJSQ 


g 












fe 


fe 


< 


15 


t 
Latin High 


510 


522 


500 


95.8 


504 


570 




24 


English High 


1,221 


1,130 


1,073 


94.9 


1,143 


1,199 




12 


Prescott 


624 


490 


464 


94.6 


495 


522 


43.5 


13 


Knapp 




706 


579 


550 


95.0 


603 


586 


45.2 


12 


Pope . 




616 


508 


479 


94.4 


535 


509 


42.4 


12 


Bell . 




595 


503 


472 


93.8 


520 


530 


44.0 


12 


Edgerly 




617 


503 


476 


94.6 


532 


502 


41.8 


13 


Glines . 




716 


550 


520 


94.4 


569 


579 


44-5 


18 


Forster 




916 


760 


710 


93.4 


795 


765 


42.5 


16 


Bingham 




856 


708 


660 


93.2 


704 


754 


47-2 


17 


Carr 




885 


762 


707 


92.8 


748 


771 


45.4 


12 


Morse . 




647 


520 


485 


93.3 


531 


541 


45.0 


10 


Brown 




576 


456 


424 


93.0 


467 


478 


47.8 


12 


Highland 




603 


529 


513 


96.9 


536 


566 


47.0 


14 


Hodgkins 




732 


649 


619 


95.3 


629 


672 


48.0 


12 


Bennett 




670 


490 


451 


92.0 


495 


505 


42.1 


10 


Hanscom 




608 


42S 


394 


92.0 


450 


438 


43.8 


8 


Proctor 




441 


337 


313 


92.7 


361 


329 


41.0 


8 


Burns . 




452 


343 


321 


93 6 


352 


365 


46.0 


8 


Lowe . 




520 


375 


345 


92-0 


379 


385 


48.1 


6 


Baxter 




445 


288 


265 


92-0 


300 


297 


49.5 


6 
4 


Perry . 
Davis . 




400 
237 


287 
163 


272 
151 


94.8 
92.8 


290 
1~66 


307 
177 


51.0 
44.2 


4 


Cummings 




223 


157 


145 


92.3 


159 


166 


41.0 


4 


Durell 




246 


175 


159 


90.8 


183 


190 


47.5 


4 


Lincoln 




295 


211 


198 


93.9 


220 


204 


51.0 


286 


Total 


15,363 


12,423 


11,666 


93.9 


12,666 


12,907 


45.0 


287 


Total for 1908 . 


15,105 


12,159 


11,458 


94.2 


12,358 


12,802 


44.9 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



199 



TABLE 9. — STATISTICS OF HIGH SCHOOLS FOR SCHOOL 
YEAR, SEPTEMBER 9, 1908, TO JUNE 24, 1909. 



Number of teachers . 
Number of days school kept 
Number enrolled 
Average number belonging 
Average daily attendance . 
Per cent, of attendance 
Tardiness .... 
Dismissals .... 
In Class I. September, 1908 
June 

Per cent, of loss 
In Class II. September, 1908 
June 

Per cent, of loss 
In Class III. September, 1908 
June 

Per cent, of loss 
In Class IV. September, 1908 
June 

Per cent, of loss 
Special students, September, 1908 
June 
Total, September, 1908 
June 

Per cent, of loss 
Number of graduates, male 
Number of graduates, female 

Total .... 
Average age, male 
Average age, female . 
Number entering college . 
Number of graduates entering technical schools 
Number of graduates entering normal schools 
Cost of instruction 
Cost of supplies . 

Total cost 
Per capita cost of instruction 
Per capita cost of supplies 
Total cost per capita . 



Latin. 



15 

183 
518 
494.3 
473.6 
95.8 
303 
324 
158 
148 

6.3 
144 
132 

8.3 
101 
96 

5 
103 
101 

2 



506 
447 
5.7 

32 
59 

91 

18-10 
18-7 
46 
1 
3 
$20,402 86 
1,738 09 
22,140 95 
41 27 
3 52 
44 79 



English. 



42 

183 

1,243 

1,122.1 
1,067.2 
95.1 
475 
347 
476 
401 

15.8 
326 
273 

16.3 
227 
205 

9.7 
186 
176 
5.4 
9 
5 
1,224 
1,060 
13.4 
58 
116 
174 
18-6 
19 
12 
8 
11 
148,681 
5,841 
54,523 
43 
5 
48 



68 
81 
49 
38 
21 
59 



200 



ANNUAL BEPOBTS. 



TABLE 10.— PUPILS BY GRADES, December, 1909, 







Teachers. 


Pupils. 


Average 

Age 
Dec 15. 


u 

o 

10 


to 

"o 

o 




















Grade. 




Women 












o 

in 

u 

V 












School. 




te 






































a 








to 


to 


i- o 


S3 

o.S 

i- 


o8 






a 

V 

s 


3 
M 


00 

"55 
<o 

< 


CO 

O 

PQ 


5 


o 
H 


u 
cd 
II 

> 


c 
o 

3 


a; **-" 




Latin 


Special . . . 






2 


5 


7 


19 







9 





<« 


Thirteenth . . 


.... 


.. . 


. . . . 


41 


59 


100 


18 


1 







7 


i < 


Twelfth. . . 




.... 




62 


71 


133 


16 


11 




10 


4 


■t 


Eleventh . . 


.... 


... 




61 


66 


127 


16 


2 




10 


8 


<< 


Tenth . . . 

Total . . . 

Special . . . 
Thirteenth. . 




.... 


.... 


108 


95 


203 


15 


3 




183 


12 




7 


9 




274 


296 


1,570 








212 


31 


English 








1 


7 


8 


19 










<« 




.... 




69 


116 


185 


18 


4 




1 


4 


■i 


Twelfth . . . 




.... 




97 


130 


227 


17 


6 




1 


11 


•« 


Eleventh . . 




.... 




133 


212 


345 


16 


4 




1 


13 


<< 


Tenth . . . 
Total . . . 

Total high 









196 


238 


434 


15 


4 




399 


48 




14 


29 


.... 


496 


703 


1,199 








402 


76 






































school 
Ninth . . . 


21 


38 





770 


999 


1,769 








614 


107 












Grammar 


11 


21 




371 


388 


759 


14 


7 




28 


109 




Eighth . . , 




22 




449 


501 


950 


13 


7 




88 


67 




Seventh . . . 




25 


1 


558 


564 


1,122 


12 


9 


.... 


204 


114 




Sixth . . . 




27 


2 


619 


580 


1,199 


11 


9 




191 


109 




Fifth . . . 




28 




669 


580 


1,249 


10 


9 




219 


142 




Fourth . . . 
Total gram- 




29 


1 


648 


659 


1,307 


9 


8 




270 


163 




























mar . . . 

Third . . . 


11 


152 
31 


4 


3,314 


3,272 


6,586 








1,000 


704 












Primary 


2 


672 


674 


1,346 


8 


6 




178 


176 


ii 


Second . . . 




31 




736 


668 


1,404 


7 


4 




174 


184 


ti 


First. . . . 
Total pri- 





33 


7 


830 


765 


1,595 


6 


1 


1,222 


123 


216 




























mary . . 
Total gram- 




9o 


9 


2,238 


2,107 


4,345 






1,222 


475 


576 




































mar and 
























primary . 


11 


247 


13 


5,552 


5,379 


10,931 






1,222 


1,475 


1,280 




Kindergarten . 




4 


4 


98 


109 


207 


4 


7 










Special teach- 


























ers .... 

Cadets . . . 

Grand totals 


4 


6 
3 






























































36 


298 


17 


6,322 


6,378 


12,907 






1,222 


2,089 


1,387 









SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. 



201 



TA3LE 11. — PUPILS IN HIGH AND GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 



- 


High 
Schools. 


Grammar 

and Primary 

Schools. 


Kinder- 
gartens. 


Total. 


Annual enrollment 


1,737 


13,204 


422 


15,363 


Average membership . 


1,652 


10,582 


189 


12423 


Average attendance 


1,573 


9.929 


164 


11,666 


Per cent, of attendance 


95.1 


93.8 


86.8 


93.9 


Number cases of tardiness . 


945 


3,477 




4,422 


Number cases of dismissal . 


692 


2,212 


. . . 


2 904 


Number cases of punishment 


... 


292 




292 


Membership, January, 1908 


1,647 


10,814 


205 


12,666 


Membership, December, 1908 


1,769 


10,931 


207 


12,907 



TABLE 12. — NUMBER OF PUPILS ADMITTED TO GRADE I 

IN SEPTEMBER. 



School. 



Prescott 
Hanscom 
Davis . 
Bennett 
Baxter 
Knapp 
Perry . 
Pope . 
Bell . 
Cummings 
Edgerly 
Glines 



1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


78 


72 


61 


33 


35 


47 


33 


39 


75 


42 


42 


22 


39 


35 


41 


81 


125 


94 


99 


92 


53 


42 


59 


46 


62 


43 


40 


35 


39 


41 


58 


42 


51 


42 


52 


33 


28 


28 


30 


39 


36 


38 


35 


38 


21 


43 


46 


40 


34 


45 


34 


38 


39 


33 


35 


70 


63 


63 


60 


60 



School. 



Forster . 

Bingham 

Carr . 

Morse 

Proctor 

Durell 

Burns 

Brown 

Highland 

Hodgkins 

Lincoln . 

Lowe 



1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


48 


74 


77 


73 


80 


83 


70 


84 


59 


40 


64 


65 


56 


64 


53 


57 


49 


61 


48 


55 


45 


39 


43 


38 


50 


53 


48 


45 


42 


52 


57 


73 


43 


55 


43 


54 


40 


51 


52 


57 


89 


75 


72 


93 



1909. 



63 
88 
64 
55 
47 
37 
55 
63 



52 
50 
83 



202 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 13. — QRAfiriAR SCHOOL GRADUATES, 1909. 





E 
o 


Number 


Number en- 


Number enter- 






certificated for 


tering 


ing 


Total. 




S 

M 

c 


High School. 


Latin School. 


English School 








£> 




>> 




>■ 




►» 


Schools. 


.- 


>» 


H 


>, 


"ci 


>, 


n 








u 


"3 


a 
o 


"«3 


a 
o 


"<3 


a 
o 




a 
5 




M 


a 


■*-» 


a 


"5 


c 


"•5 


c 






4) 
E 


o 
*** 

C 


c 
o 
u 


o 
a 


73 

a 
o 
u 


o 

•c 

-3 

c 


-a 
a 
o 
u 


o 
'•3 


c 
o 




9 


o 




o 


c 


o 


c 


o 


a 




z 


U 


& 


U 


t3 


U 


& 


U 


u 


Prescott . . . 


27 


1 


26 





10 





8 





18 


Knapp 








70 


1 


70 





9 





40 





49 


Pope 








48 


14 


33 


2 


7 


6 


18 


8 


25 


Bell . 








59 





57 





17 





26 





43 


Edgerly 








82 


13 


65 





18 


7 


41 


7 


59 


Glines 








43 


5 


36 


3 


7 


1 


23 


4 


30 


Forster 








73 


8 


65 





18 


6 


32 


6 


50 


Bingham 








36 


7 


26 





9 


3 


12 


3 


21 


Carr 








W 


2 


58 





11 


1 


30 


1 


41 


Morse 








44 


2 


41 





15 


1 


18 


1 


33 


Brown 








43 


5 


37 





5 


3 


26 


3 


31 


Highland 








95 


9 


85 


1 


33 


5 


37 


6 


70 


Hodgkins 








55 
741 


10 


40 


2 


15 


3 


17 


5 


32 


Total . - . 


77 


639 


8 1 174 


36 


328 


44 


502 



TABLE 14. — TRUANT STATISTICS. 





1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


Number visits of officer to schools . 


435 


525 


429 


567 


511 


474 


401 


787 


Absences investigated . . 


384 


521 


387 


514 


502 


499 


655 


1,185 


Cases of truancy .... 


163 


152 


146 


150 


151 


94 


155 


265 


Truants arrested .... 


. , 


24 


8 


7 


11 


14 


11 


o 


Sent to truant school 


6 


9 


5 


4 


6 


9 


6 


2 


Number now in truant school . 


9 


5 


5 


8 


10 


18 


15 


14 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. 



203 



TABLE 15. — ATTENDANCE IN ELEMENTARY EVENING 
SCHOOLS, FROM OCTOBER, 1908, TO MARCH, 1909. 







Prescott. 


Bell. 


Highland. 


Total. 


Enrolled ... 


Male 
Female 


58 
22 


467 
103 


95 

18 


620 
143 




Total 


80 


570 


113 


763 


Ave. membership 


Male 
Female 


42 

19 


191 
57 


55 
12 


288 
88 




Total 


61 


248 


67 


376 


Ave. attendance 


Male 
Female 


33 
17 


148 

42 


40 
10 


221 
69 




Total 


50 


190 


50 


290 


Per cent. Att. out of No. 

belonging 
Per cent. Att. out of No. 

enrolled 


• • 


82.0 
62.5 


76.0 
33.3 


74.6 
44.2 


77.1 
38.0 


Ave. No. of teachers 


Male 
Female 


2 
1 


4 
15 


1 
3 


7 
19 




Total 


3 


19 


4 


26 


No. of sessions 


• 


78 


78 


78 


234 


Teachers, cost of 
Janitors, supplies, and light, 
cost of . 


, , 


$553 50 
149 36 


$2,748 00 
407 38 


$644 50 
134 13 


$3,946 00 

690 87 




Total 


$702 86 


$3,155 38 


$778 63 


$4,636 87 


Cost per pupil per even- 
ing . . . . 

Cost per evening 

Cost per pupil in ave. mem- 
bership 

Cost per pupil in ave. at- 
tendance 


• 


$0 180 
9 01 

11 52 

14 06 


$0 252 
40 45 

12 72 

16 08 


$0 234 
9 98 

11 62 

15 57 


$0 205 
59 45 

12 33 

15 99 



204 



ANNUAL KEPORTS. 



TABLE 15 (Concluded).— Evening High School, Season of 1908-1909. 

Male. Female. Total. 

Enrolled 421 289 710 

Average membership 228 199 427 

Average attendance 168 146 314 

Number of teachers 10 10 20 

Number of sessions 58 

Cost of instruction ., $3,688.00 

Cost of supplies and light 517.13 

Total cost $4,205.13 

Cost per pupil per evening 0.231 

Average attendance: October, 430; November, 355; December, 
312; January, 266; February, 251; March, 265. 



Statistics of Evening Schools for a Series of Years. 





to 
C 

.2 

VI 

<u 
VI 

6 


"o 
a 
W 


Average 
Attendance. 


at 

o 
U 


a «> 
P-..2 

V « 

*« 
10 1* 

O V 


High* 1900-1901 . . 
1901-1902 . . 
1902-1903 . . 
1903-1904 . 
1904-1905 . . 
1905-1906 . 
1906-1907 • - 
1907-1908 • 
1908-1909 . 




48 
46 
47 
48 
74 
93 
77 
56 
58 


192 
211 
178 
191 
762 
605 
631 
614 
710 


79 

99 

78 

74 
224 
154 
177 
295 ! 
314 


$1,433 
1,424 
1,331 
1,378 
6,699 
5,548 
4,802 
4,009 
4,205 


$0 378 
316 
379 
388 
404 
387 
352 
243 
231 


Elementary 1900-1901 . 
1901-1902 . 
1902-1903 . 
1903-1904 . 
1904-1905 . 
1905-1906 . 
1906-1907 . 
1907-1908 . 
1908-1909 . 




74+ 

75 

86 

92 

75 

84 

76 

75 

78 


612 
700 
741 
859 
747 
698 
917 
918 
763 


220 

260 
264 
333 
329 
324 
328 
363 
290 


$3,809 
5,452 
5,857 
7,286 
6,088 
6,303 
5,313 
5,248 
4,637 


$0 232 
279 
257 
237 
247 
233 
213 
193 
205 



'Prawing sdiooj only until 1904-1905. 



fAyerage of four scl)ooJ$, 





HHMMMHM|-i|4p|JMI-iMHMMMMH 
COIOCOCOCOCOCOCDCOCOOOOOOOOOGOGOGOGOGOGO 
OOOOOOOOOOCDCOCOCDCOCOCOcDCOCD 
COOO-JOSCT^^COtO^'OCOOO-aOSOT^COtOt-iO 


< 

H 

> 

X 


-a 

CH 
90 


to ^coco^coco^cocococococococo^rf^^cn 


Prescott. 


CO 
CO 


t- 1 

OlCnOSO»^CO*^^CO^O»rf^COCOCOtOOSCO-aO Rpl] 
COt-itOtf^OOiOxOOOOC^OCOCDrf^tOCOOOSCOCS bcu. 


to 

05 


-^-josos-jooasos-j^oscom-am-J^-J^^ 
co^-^-a^rf^tot-'CCotoi-iotooocooocnh- i o« 


Forster. 


CO 

-a 

CO 


^-Jrfx^^rfxGO^^CO^^^COCSCSCS^OlOt 
h^i— ^rf^rf^OSOlCNCOI-'GOOSGOOOCOOSCOCOOtCS 


Morse. 


i— i 

CO 

-J 

CO 


I- 4 1-» 

cpGotoooo-Josos-j^*. co^-a-aosos^^ot 
c^oooscooicoox-atococoash-^ocooo-aoi^-a 


Highland. 


to 

to 

OS 


OOOiOO^^^cnrf^^^^CtO^^^^I^CO 
lwO^-*cO-Jrf^MOS-a-aOOCOOStOh-*OSCOCO 


Edgerly. 


-a 

o 
o 


OOrfx ►KtOOsaoOtCo4^4^CSO-JOSCJiOSOS 


Pope. 


-J 

►£- ; ^osc^o^JScococococototocococococo 

rf^ O OS OS #>* 00 00 ^ ,_» oo rfx rfi. oo Oi Cn ^ to GO CO 


Knapp. 


OS 

to 

OS 


U«HCOOOMOtOU)HtOCMO' 


Hodgkins. 


o 
o 


05b3b0O05O)HOCH05-a0<-4 


Glines. 


CO 

CO 


CT. OlOS*>-C«rf^*«.CnCOCOCO 
CSOOOCOOOCO-Ji— ' OS CO GO 


Carr. 


1— I 

-a 


CO CO CO CO CO 
OS OS Ot CO h- 


Bingham. 


oo 

CO 


CO O 


Brown. 


CO 
OS 
1— I 

1— » 


— J -^ — JOS05C7«hf^i^*«.rfi.*».COCOCOCOCOCOCOtOCO 
^rfi.Mif-Oi- 'GOCOCOCOOSOCOS— J-400CO — J CO M 
t- i tOC"OOStO^-a~Jrf^QOtOG004^COOOOOSOO 


Total. 


OS 

-J 

CO 

o 
to 


p ppppepooooooopo -J^JOS OS OS OS OS OS 
at ^ £>. to to -3 co co oo os co o os to co "os os*oi oo 

OOi-i*».OOCOOStOi-'000'tOOOOtO-atOCOOS 

fcCOO©a«CK)00H®H«CMMWOi^WCnb5 


Average 
Membership of 
Grammar and 
Primary Schools. 


pi 
to 


^^OSosCnC^CncnC^rf^C^rf^rfi.O»C7tOTOxcn^Cn 

o^cDk)bo^^cob^coo^6o^co6ocobscoto 
oca* toooos^co*».coooT^co-ao-^r-40*>. 

• 


Per cent, of Aver- 
age Membership 
Graduating. 


OS 

"oo 

CO 


<^C^Ci^^cOCOCOCOCOCOtOtOtOtOtOtOtOt-'l--i 
h^C«OS-^Ios05C«0'--II-irf»-00--lGOO<Oi^tOCOOO 
OiHM(^joMrfi.OtO-4WMCOMO<COOOOCOrfi. 


Entered 
High School. 


-a 
la 

CO 


^[^•^•^^-^-^•^•^•^"^•^•^"^osososososcn 

co^^^p^coo^fococorf^psoocnpi-i-a-ci 

o^^^"*os^^6oo^cn^of- i ocobstoco 

OOCSOOOOO^OOOtOOJCOOOOtf^OtOCOOS 


Per cent. 

Entering of those 

Graduating. 



> 
OS 

r 
m 



a 

70 

> 



w 70 
en 



to 
o 

O 
O 

r 
a 

> 
o 

c 
► 

H 

m 



206 



AXXUAL EEPOETS. 



TABLE 17.— ATTENDANCE STATISTICS 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



1 












Ratio of 


December. 


Enrollment. 


Average 
Membership. 


Average 
Attendance. 


Per cent, of 
Attendance, i 


Number of 
Tardinesses. 


Tardiness 
to Average 
Attendance. 


1886 


6,350 


4.985 


4,678 


93.8 


2,834 


0.606 


1887 


6,605 


5.198 


4,879 


93.8 


2,699 


0.553 


1888 


7.262 


5.488 


5,174 


94.0 


2,938 


0.549 


1889 


i.757 


5.956 


5,585 


93.8 


2,780 


0.498 


1890 


7,878 


6,485 


6^075 


93.6 


3,133 


0.516 


1891 


8,510 


6.502 


6,091 


93.7 


3,182 


0.522 


1S92 


9.120 


7.035 


6.608 


93.9 


3.181 


0.481 


1893 


9,632 


7.217 


6.790 


94.1 


3,375 


0.497 


1894 


9,387 


7,212 


6,840 


94.8 


3,000 


0.419 


1895 


9,913 


7,617 


7.255 


95.2 


2,736 


0.377 


1896 


10.582 


8,077 


7,663 


94.9 


2,743 


0.358 


1897 


11.293 


8,589 


8.144 


94.8 


2,486 


0.305 


1898 


11.577 


9,085 


8,636 


95.1 


2,941 


0.341 


1899 


11.975 


9,502 


8,965 


94.3 


2,566 


0.286 


1900 


12.345 


9,823 


9.174 


93.4 


2,759 


0.300 


1901 


12.499 


9,991 


9.350 


93.6 


2,937 


0.294 


1902 


13.116 


10.402 


9.733 


93.5 


3,335 


0.343 


1903 


13,475 


10,719 


10.056 


93.9 


3,428 


0.342 


1904 


13.804 


11.094 


10.422 


' 93.9 


3,887 


0.373 


1905 


14,296 


11.543 


10,801 


94.4 


3,746 


0.344 


1906 


14.551 


11.762 


11.069 


94.1 


4,046 


0.366 


1907 


14,802 


11.909 


11,166 


93.8 


4,170 


0.373 


1903 


15,105 


12 159 


11.458 


94.2 


3,882 


0.344 


1909 


15,303 


12,4^3 


11,666 


93.9 


4,422 


0.379 



SCHOOL TEPAETMENT. 



207 



TABLE 18. — MEMBERSHIP, ETC., OF HIGH SCHOOL 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 









Per cent, of 


1 


Per cent, of 




Average 


Largest 


Average 


Number of 


Average 


Year. 


Membership 


Number in 


Membership 


Graduates of 


Membership 




all Schools. 


High School. 


of all 

Schools. 


High School. 


of all 
Schools. 


1867 


2,157 


119 


5.51 


7 


0.32 


1868 


2,285 


141 


6.17 


17 


0.75 


1869 


2,480 


15S 


6.37 


25 


1.01 


1870 


2,639 


165 


6.25 


16 


0.65 


1871 


2,549 


161 


6.31 


33 


1.29 


1872 


2,799 


186 


6.64 


21 


0.75 


1873 


3,217 


190 


5.91 


28 


0.87 


1874 


3,265 


198 


6.06 


26 


0.79 


1875 


3,515 


213 


6.06 


31 


0.88 


1876 


3,712 


226 


6.09 


33 


0.81 


1877 


3,788 


227 


5.91 


37 


0.98 


1878 


3,992 


250 


6.26 


31 


0.78 


1879 


4,169 


246 


5.90 


34 


0.82 


1880 


4,278 


254 


5.93 


27 


0.63 


1881 


4,064 


256 


6.29 


34 


0.84 


1882 


4,263 


2S0 


6.57 


33 


0.77 


1883 


4,438 


278 


6.26 


43 


0.97 


1884 


4,804 


315 


6.55 


46 


0.96 


1885 


4,904 


3S5 


7.85 


46 


0.94 


1886 


4,985 


374 


6.70 


56 


1.12 


1887 


5,198 


387 


7.44 


53 


1.02 


1888 


5,488 


435 


7.92 


60 


1.09 


1889 


5,956 


444 


7.45 


67 


1.12 


1890 


6,485 


487 


7.51 


60 


0.93 


1891 


6,502 


535 


8.23 


68 


1.05 


1892 


7,035 


577 


8.20 


80 


1.14 


1893 


7,217 


626 


8.67 


82 


1.14 


1894 


7,274 


691 


9.50 


111 


1.52 


1895 


7,617 


775 


10.17 


92 


1.21 


1896 


8,077 


858 


10.62 


119 


1.47 


1897 


8,589 


885 


10.31 


121 


1.59 


1898 


9,085 


890 


9.80 


130 


1.43 


1899 


9,502 


985 


10.70 


137 


1.49 


1900 


9,823 


1,031 


10.49 


131 


1.33 


1901 


9,991 


1,098 


10.99 


152 


1.52 


1902 


10,402 


1,138 


10.94 


164 


1.58 


1903 


10,719 


1,208 


11.27 


181 


1.70 


1904 


11,094 


1,286 


11.60 


179 


1.61 


1905 


11,543 


1,372 


11.89 


211 


1.83 


1906 


11,762 


1,473 


12.52 


208 


1.77 


1907 


11,909 


1,614 


13.55 


223 


1.87 


1908 


12,159 


1,707 


14.04 


235 


1.93 


1909 


12,423 


1,828 


14.71 


265 


2.13 



208 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 19. — PROriOTIONS FOR SCHOOL YEAR ENDING JUNE 

30, 1909. 





6 
E 


13 Z 


3 




c 


otions 
June. 


>pped 
Trial. 


Grade. 


O +1 

0> 


dition 
sd to 
rade. 


c 
o 


.s 

IS 




Prom 
:tween 
er and 


es Drc 

k af tei 
onths' 




a a 
s o 


o o w 
a E 


o 

E 

o 


m 


1° 


ecial 

b« 

temb 


mote 

bac 

ee M 




c 


L> S 


u 


a 


o 


Q. P. 


o J: 




O 


M ft 


ft 


-1 


ft 


M & 


>- 43 

ft H 


I 


1,458 


1,155 


83 


219 


1 


1 




II 


1,372 


1,083 


145 


140 


4 


3 


3 


III 


1,287 


1,056 


122 


109 




5 


12 


IV 


1,270 


995 


162 


110 


3 


6 


9 


V 


1,221 


960 


159 


93 


9 


14 


5 


VI 


1,146 


875 


164 


99 


8 


2 


5 


VII 


1,060 


795 


172 


PI 


2 


1 


3 


VIII 


810 


578 


140 


92 


• . . 


14 


4 


IX 


750 


641 


78 


31 


. . . 


30 


7 


Total 


10,374 


8,138 


1,225 


984 


27 


76 


48 



Percentage of Promotions for School Year Ending; June 30, 1909. 



Grade. 


■ 

o 
6 

o *i 

ft^ 

c S 
=* 2 

c 
O 


Unconditionally 

Promoted to Next 

Grade. 


"3 

•c 

H 

a 
o 

•o 
u 

o 

B 

c 

hi 

ft 


a 
IS 

4» 

« 

■M 

0) 

l-J 


a 

re 

o rt 

Is 

CO 

o 

u 

ft 


Special Promotions 

between 
September and June. 


Promotees Dropped 
Back after 
Three Months' Trial. 


I 


100 


79.2 


5.7 


15.1 








II 


100 


78.9 


10.6 


10.2 


0.3 


0.2 


2.0 


III 


100 


82.0 


9.5 


8.5 


... 


0.4 


9.8 


IV 


100 


78.3 


12.8 


8.7 


0.2 


0.5 


5.5 


V 


100 


78.7 


13.0 


7.6 


0.7 


1.1 


3.1 


VI 


100 


76.4 


14.3 


8.6 


0.7 


0.1 


3.0 


VII 


100 


75.0 


16.2 


8.6 


0.2 


... 


1.7 


VIII 


100 


71.4 


17.3 


11.3 


. .. 


1.7 


.2.9 


IX 


100 


85.5 


10.4 


4.1 


... 


4.0 


9.0 


Average 


100 


78.4 


11.8 


9.5 


0.3 


0.7 


3.9 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



209 



TABLE 19A.— PROMOTIONS FOR SCHOOL YEAR IN HIGH 
SCHOOLS FOR YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1909. 





On June 

Promotion 

List. 


Promoted 

To Next 

Grade. 


.s 

2 

© 

hi 




547 


499 


48 


XI 


400 


382 


18 


XII 


302 


293 


9 


XIII 


271 


265 


6 




1520 


1439 


81 



Percentage of Promotions for School Year in High Schools. 





On June 

Promotion 

List. 


Promoted 

To Next 
Grade. 




•r-i 

A 

(V 

pq 

o> 


Grade X 


100 


91.2 


8.8 


XI 


100 


95.5 


4.5 


XII 


100 


97.0 


3.0 


XIII 


100 


97.7 


2.3 


Total 


100 


94.6 


5.4 



210 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 20. — RESIGNATION OF TEACHERS, 1909. 



School. 


Teacher. 


Resignation 
Took Effect. 


In Service. 


Latin High 


Mabel E. Bovvker 


June 30, 1909 


1 year 


Latin High 


Gertrude M. Hall 


May 30, 1909 


1 year, 9 mos. 


Latin High 


Miriam Thayer 


June 30, 1909 


4 years 


English High 


l Charles F. Abbott 


<i (i ii 


8 years 


English High 


i George W. Earle 


it (i << 


8 years, 6 mos. 


English High 


l Carrie A. Marsh 


it <( << 


13 years, 6 mos. 


English High 


i Eda L. Nichols 


March 1, 1909 


13 years, 7 mos. 


Prescott 


Rebekah Bruorton 


June 30, 1909 


1 year 


Hanscom . 


Adelaide J. Anderson 


ii << «« 


3 years 


Hanscom . 


Gladys Loring 


<< <( << 


3 years 


Davis . . 


Jennie A. Drew 


Sept. 30, 1909 


6 years 


Baxter . . 


Helen Thicker 


«< <( ii 


36 years, 9 mos. 


Knapp . . 


Nina M. Doanan 


<< <t ii 


5 years 


Bell . . . 


Martha E. Daniels 


December, 1909 


18 years, 5 mos. 


Forster . . 


Mabel F. Powell 


June 30, 1909 


7 1-2 mos. 


Forster . . 


E. Mina Smith 


ii ii <( 


13 years 


Bingham . 


Georgia M. Robbins 


ii << ii 


3 years 


Carr . . . 


L. Isadore Wood 


ii it << 


3 years 


Morse . . 


Annie L. Ball 


(< ii i< 


2 years, 3 mos. 


Hodgkins . 


Mabel E. Bemis 


ii ii << 


4 mos. 


Hodgkins . 


Josephine T. Field 


March 29, 1909 


5 years, 6 mos. 


Hodgkins . 


M. Alice Paul 


February, 1909 


29 years, 6 mos. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



211 



TABLE 2!.— TEACHERS ELECTED IN 1909. 



School. 


Teacher. 


Coming From 


Began 

Service. 


Salary. 


Latin High 


Kate M. Monro 


Biddeford, Me. 


Nov. 1, '09 


$ 800 


Latin High 
Latin High 


Alfred W. Dickinson 
Natalie A. Smith 




Sept., " 
June 1, " 


200 


Reading 


950 


English High 


Cara F. Dillingham 


Grafton 


Sept. 8," 


750 


English High 


Roy W. Hatch 


Lexington 


U »* it 


1,300 


English High 


Frank A. Scott 


Scituate 


M U It 


1,300 


English High 
English High 


Augustus B. Tripp 
Stephen E. Wright 




(( (< H 


800 


Essex 


(« «( It 


1,300 


Prescott . 


Edyth M. Grimshaw 


Woonsocket, R. I. 


May, " 


700 


Baxter . . 




Eleanor A. Connor 


Somerville 




600 


Knapp . 




Nellie T. McCarthy 


Dracut 


Sept. 8, '09 


700 


Bell . . 




Rena S. Hezelton 


Littleton, N. H. 


Oct., « 


650 


Forster. 




Annie J. Ireland 


Somerville 




700 


Forster . 




. M. Edna Merrill 


Newmarket, N. H. 


Sept. 8, '09 


600 


Highland 




Charlotte M. Canfield 


Maynard 


t( M l( 


650 


Hodgkins 




Mabel E. Bemis 


Cliftondale 


April, " 


700 


Hodgkins 




Luanna B. DeCatur 


Chelsea 


Sept. 8, '09 


700 


Hodgkins 




Ethel M. Paige 


Stoneham 


• « U (( 


700 


Hodgkins 




Dorothy G. Stevens 


Maiden 


a (( U 


700 





ASSISTANTS IN SERVICE DECEMBER, 1909. 




Hanscom 




Agness M. Travis 




Burns . 
Proctor . 
Lowe . . 




Mary C. Buck 




> 


Annie Sanburn 




Baxter . 




Lynda V. Merrill 




Perry . 






Nona Blackwell 




Perry . 






Alice L. Reid 




Bingham 






Frances E. Welch 




Morse . 






Mary E. Lovell 




Hodgkins 






Ellen A. Baker 




Hodgkins 






Lillian M. Huntington 




Lincoln 






Louise K. Simm 




Lincoln 






Jane A. Smith 




Lowe . 






Marian Poole 





CADETS. 



Isabel M. Briinton 



Julia M. Delay 



Susie A. Fitzpatrick 



212 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 22. -LEAVE OF ABSENCE OF TEACHERS. 

September 8, 1909, Anna Pushee, for school year ending June 30, 
1910. 

September 8, 1909, Clara B. Sackett, for school year ending June 
30, 1910. 

September 8, 1909, Gertrude M. Sias (died January 10, 1910). 

September 8, 1909, Bessie 1. Sutton, for school year ending June 
30, 1910. 



TABLE 23.— TRANSFER OF TEACHERS. 



Tbachbrs. 


From 


To 


Harriette C. Hamilton .... 

Ardelle Abbott 

Emma B. Jones ...... 

Cora F. Woodward 


Knapp 
Morse 
Burns 
Durell 


Morse 
Burns 
Hanscom 
Morse 



TABLE 24.— NUHBER OF TEACHERS 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 













Assistants 










High 


Grammar 


Primary 


Special 


not in 








Ybar. 


School. 


School. 


School. 


Teachers. 


Charge of 
Room. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


1886 


9 


62 


48 


1 





9 


in 


120 


1887 


10 


64 


48 


1 





9 


114 


123 


1888 


10 


66 


52 


4 


7 


9 


130 


139 


1889 


10 


60 


56 


4 


7 


10 


127 


137 


1890 


10 


78 


58 


5 


7 


12 


146 


158 


1891 


12 


86 


63 


5 


13 


12 


167 


179 


1892 


13 


90 


67 


5 


10 


12 


173 


185 


1893 


14 


88 


63 


5 


19 


12 


177 


189 


1894 


15 


91 


66 


6 


11 


12 


177 


189 


1895 


28 


91 


73 


5 


12 


19 


186 


209 


1896 


30 


102 


74 


6 


14 


22 


208 


230 


1897 


31 


109 


85* 


6 


18 


22 


227 


249 


1898 


32 


112 


87* 


7 


13 


23 


229 


252 


1899 


36 


119 


92* 


7 


9 


23 


240 


263 


1900 


40 


127 


96* 


7 


6 


24 


249 


273 


1901 


44t 


130 


94* 


7 


•8 


26 


257 


283 


1902 


4ot 


140 


91* 


7 


9 


26 


266 


292 


1903 


46t 


143 


96* 


7 


14 


25 


281 


306 


1904 


48* 


152 


98* 


7 


9 


27 


285 


312 


1905 


m 


153 


100* 


7 


7 


27 


288 


315 


1906 


MX 


157 


99* 


7 


9 


29 


297 


326 


1907 


57J 


160 


97* 


9 


14 


32 


305 


337 


1908 


58^ 


164 


97* 


10 


16 


34 


311 


345 


1909 


59} 


1C6 


99* 


10 


16 


36 


314 


350 



•Including four kindergartners. 
t Including two secretaries. 
% Including one secretary. 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. 213 



TABLE 25.— BOOKS AUTHORIZED FOR USE, 1909. 
For Grammar and Primary Schools. 

As reference books. 

The Hygiene of the Schoolroom, Barry Silver, Burdett & Co. 

Civics "and Health, Allen Ginn & Co. 

A Color Notation, A. E. Munsell George H. Ellis Co. 

Applied Arts Drawing Books, Seegmiller, 

Atkinson, Mentzer & Grover 

Teachers' Edition of Educational Music Series Ginn & Co. 

As text-books. 

The Gulick Hygiene Series Ginn & Co. 

Wide Awake Primer Little, Brown & Co. 

Wide Awake First Reader Little, Brown & Co. 

How the World Is Clothed, F. G. Carpenter American Book Co. 

How the World Is Fed, F. G. Carpenter American Book Co. 

English for Foreigners, O'Brien Houghton Mifflin Co. 

Natural School Geography Series American Book Co. 

F rye's Grammar School Geography ' Ginn & Co. 



For High Schools. 

As reference books. \ 

Corporation and Voucher Accounting, Marshall, 

Goodyear, Marshall Publishing Co. 

Ganot's Physics William Wood & Co. 

Elementary Electricity and Magnetism, Jackson.. The Macmillan Co. 

General Physics, Hastings and Beach Ginn & Co. 

Principles of Physics, revised by Goodspeed. 

Source Book of Greek History, Fling D. C. Heath & Co. 

International Students' Atlas. 

Text-Book of Physics, Duff P. Blakiston & Co. 

Fossil Fishes and Fossil Plants of Triassic Rocks of New 
Jersey and Connecticut Valley. 

The Glacial Lake Agassiz, W. Upham. 

Geology of Old Hampshire County, Mass., B. K. Emerson. 

Geology of Narragansett Basin, N. S. Shaler. ' 

As text-books. 

Elementary French Grammar, Aldrich and Foster Ginn & Co. 

Readings from French History, Super Allyn & Bacon 

German Lesson Grammar, Joynes and Wesselhoeft, 

D. C. Heath & Co. 

Der Neffe als Onkel, Schiller Allyn & Bacon 

Lectures Faciles, Lazare Ginn & Co. 

Selections from Guy de Maupassant Ginn & Co. 

La Malade Imaginaire, Moliere Ginn & Co. 

Dix Contes Modernes des Meilleurs Auteurs du Jours, Potter, 

Ginn & Co. 

Les Miserables, Hugo Ginn & Co. 

Outline of Mediaeval and Modern European History (pamph- 
let to be used in connection with second-year history), 

D. C. Heath & Co. 

Progressive Problems in Physics, Fred R. MiUer..D. C. Heath & Co. 



214 



ANNUAL REPOETS. 



TABLE 26.— GRADUATION EXERCISES, 1909. 

High Schools. 

The graduation exercises of the high schools occurred on 
Thursday, June 24, at the First Methodist Episcopal Church, in 
the presence of a large audience of parents and friends. 

The formal address to graduates was given by Sam Walter 
Foss. 

At the close of the address, the chairman of the committee, 
Henry H. Folsom, presented diplomas to the 264 members of 
the graduating classes. 

Order of Exercises. 

Henry H. Folsom, Chairman of School Board, presiding. 

Overture. 

"Zampa." * 

Boston Festival Orchestra. 



Herold 
Tours 



1. *tSinging. 

Semi-Chorus: "The New Kingdom." 

2. Prayer. 

Rev. Robert W. Beers. 

3. Singing.- 

Solo and Chorus: "Hear My Prayer" (Motet), 

Mendelssohn (1809) 
Misses Edith R. Jones, Latin, and Isabelle E. Simmons, English. 

4. Address to Graduates. 

Sam Walter Foss, of Somerville. 

5. tSinging. ! 

Boys' Solo and Chorus: "The Armorer." Nevin 

6. Presentation of Diplomas. 

Henry H. Folsom, Chairman of the School Board. 

7. tSinging. 

Solo and Chorus: "Good Night, Farewell." Garrett 









* All singing accompanied by the orchestra under the direction of S. Henry Hadley, 
teacher of music in the schools. 

t Orchestration by S. Henry Hadley. 



Latin High School Graduates. 



Ruth Eveline Andrews. 
Vivian Beers. 
Ada Louise Belt. 
Gladys Nichols Bodge. 
Alice Maude Chamberlain. 
Mary Louise Cheney. 
Lois Elizabeth Chickering. 
Gertrude Georgeanna Clough. 
Portia Elizabeth Clough. 
Ernestine Zelma Cohen. 
Elizabeth Frances Coogan. 
Louise Christine Coogan. 
Elizabeth Ellen Cook. 
Marion Corliss. 
Clyda Abbie Corwin. 



Hazel Morton dishing. 
Alice Louise Delaney. 
Maude Ethel Dickson. 
Nectar Madeleine Eksergian. 
Dorothy Doane Fales. 
Helen Clark French. 
Gertrude Augusta Graves. 
Alice Wheeler Hammond. 
Mabel Fairfield Hatch. 
Blanche Eleanor Hight. 
Elizabeth Hirst. 
Dorothy Shepherd Hopkins. 
Mabel Marie Hopkins. 
May Gertrude ^Howard. 
Edith Read Jones. 






SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



215 



Irene Kibbe. 
Ella Hazel Macy. 
Ruth Mildred Martin. 
Marion Elizabeth Mead. 
Gertrude Spencer Mitchell. 
Lena Rosa Moore. 
Bernice Mildred Oakes. 
Isabella Gertrude Owler. 
Emma Andrews Perry. 
Marion Brackett Puffer. 
Laura Francene Raymond. 
Mabelle Mclntyre Reed. 
Florence Whitney Rice. 
Marion Ward Sawyer. 
Fannie Isabel Seiniger. 
Laurette Mary Shaw. 
Stella Marie Shepard. 
Ellen Ashcroft Smallwood. 
Helen Peirce Smith. 
Beatrice Mildred Sprague. 
Mabel Ellen Stevens. 
Gladys Foster Taylor. 
Lucy Hall Taylor. 
Lillian Barker Treadwell. 
Josephine Wentworth. 
Lorene Aurelia Whitney. 
Mabel Woodill Wilber. 
Alma Gertrude Wiley. 
Helen Laura Wyman. 

Herman Castner Benner. 



Richard Williams Bennett. 
William John Brown. 
Alger Trull Bunten. 
Henry Joseph Cabeceiras. 
Roger Ammiel Colman. 
Chester Sheldon Cook. 
Robert Avery Crenner. 
George Edward Dodge. 
Matthew Charles Duggan. 
Fred Clarke Gunter. 
Raymond Florance Henderson. 
William Stuart Howe. 
William Hunnewell. 
Alfred Foster Kendall. 
Herbert Alexander Macdonald. 
Howard Alexander MacLean. 
Francis John McCarthy. 
Daniel Carothers Merrill. 
Ralph Elwyn Merry. i 

John Clayton Milliken. 
James Leo Muldoon. 
Miles John Muldoon. 
Allison Lewis Hedge Newton. 
Walter Harvey Nolan. 
Emil Maurice Robertson. 
Edmund Russell. 
Spencer Leeds Sawyer. 
John Elliot Slater. 
Matthew George Sullivan. 
Nathaniel Sterns Thayer. 
Clarence Bryant Wilber. 



English High School Graduates. 



Helen Gertrude Anderson. 
Ida Barnett. 

Blanche Modjeska Benson. 
Winifred Hamilton Bent. 
Mildred Benthall. 
Ethel Mildred Bird. 
Marion Louise Bolton. 
Margueritte Emmeline Borns. 
Beatrice Louise Bowditch. 
Ruth Bowman. 
Bertha Marion Boyd. 
Florence Lillian Briggs. 
Loretto Gertrude Brine. 
Beatrice Ina Brownville. 
Hazel Gertrude Burke. 
Rose Anna Burke. 
Annie Jane Burns. 
Anna Veronica Byrnes. 
Edith Marion Cabot. 
Helen Caless. 
Aline Dudley Campbell. 
Bertha Louise Chapman. 
Elsie Marion Clark. 
Mary Eliza Clark. 
Elsie Mildred Craft. 



Martha Washington Delay. 
Frances Margaret Donovan. 
Alice Christina Duncan. 
Eleanor Dunning. 
Marion Lucille Emerson. 
Florida Esdale. 
Elizabeth Constance Farrell. 
Gertrude Vivian Farrell. 
Mary Louise Farrell. 
Myrtle Adams Feltus. 
Bessie Leone Fisher. 
May Elizabeth Fitzgerald. 
Jeanie Somerville Fleming. 
Jean Elizabeth Follett. 
Ruth Evans Gillard. 
Clara Alice Goudey. 
Louise Grainger. 
Rose Greenberg. 
Ethel Caroline Haradon. 
Mildred Louise Hatch. 
Irma Haynes. 
Margaret Rose Healy. 
Mary Gertrude Healy. 
Margaret Isabel Heath. 
Kathleen West Hemeon. 



216 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Alice Margaret Hill. 

Elizabeth Mary Holt. 

Bessie Collins Horton. 

Caroline Lois Hunt. 

Margaret Josephine Hurley. 

Edith Elizabeth Joiner. 

Mildred Louise Joiner. 

Mabel Frances Kenneson. 

Lillie Ellen King. 

Ruth Elizabeth Kingman. 

Gladys Anne Kingsley. 

Carrie Rich Knowles. 

Lillian King Lamb. 

Eudora Davis Leitch. 

Hilda Mary Linfield. 

Esther Lizzie Lovejoy. 

Florence Crystal Brainard Lowe. 

Lillian Louise Lunt. 

Josephine Elsie Macdonald. 

Ruth Sarah Manning. 

Mary Madeline McCune. 

Grace Emily Mcintosh. 

Florence Louise McKenna. 

Annie Winifred McLean. 

Mary Sabra Merritt. 

Mary Wood Diack Mitchell. 

Edith Francis Moore. I 

Frances Teresa Moran. 

Aline Leavitt Morgan. 

Katherine Anna Mullen. 

Bertha Inez Nason. 

Alfield Carrie Nelson. 

Marion Nicholson. 

Myrtle Nicholson. 

Rose May Niles. 

Blanche Aramede Ogier. 

Dorothy Olin. 

Elizabeth O'Neill. 

Margaret Mary O'Neil. 

Dora Christina Pedersen. 

Jennie Maria Pedersen. 

Grace Frances Perron. ' 

Edith Sarah Potter. 

Pearl Victoria Rideout. 

Alice May Ronan. 

Ethel Dorothy Sampson. 

Josephine May Sander. 

Marian Helena Sargent. 

Isabelle Eliza Simmons. 

Maude Wellman Skinner. 

Helen Belinda Smart. 

Helen Spear. 

Eva Gertrude Stevens. 

Edna Frances Teele. 

Maude Ethel Thomas. 

Florence Maynard Thompson. 

Maysel Huntingdon Tracy. 

Gertrude Mae Trickey. 

Alice May Vincent. 

Eleanor Elizabeth Waldron. 

iteborah Waranow. 

Ethel Mildred Waugh. 



Grace Maud Webster. 
Emily Hayes Wilder. 
Helen Worcester. 

Ralph Wight Atwater. 
William Ernest Bagster. 
Roland Henry Bezanson. 
Frank Nelson Blanchard. 
Irving Gaetz Blois. 
Stephen George Brennan. 
Chester Augustus Brigham. 
Arthur Leo Cavanagh. 
Walter Harlow Chambers. 
Ernest Wilder Chapin. 
Henry Ripley Cheetham. 
Joseph Gerard Clarke. 
Senekerim Mardiros Dohanian. 
Edward Ambrose Donahue. 
Fred Warren Flint. 
Harris Howard Freeman. 
John Whittier Geddes. 
John Arthur Gillooly. 
John Edward Gurvin. 
Lester Carlisle Gustin. 
Otis Lester Handley. 
Leslie Kimball Harlow. 
James Joseph Harrington. 
Carl Larrabee Hartshorn. 
Arthur Cushman Haskell. 
Burt Alden Hazeltine. 
Francis C. K. Hogan. 
Louis Frederick Holm. 
Charles Edwin Holmes. | 

Oscar Lanson Honnors. 
Charles Thomas Hughes. 
Adelbert Lewis Jones. 
Walter Leverett Jones. 
Earl Herman Kathan. 
Paul-Emile Laurent. 
Edward Lowell Littlefield. 
Herman Miille, Jr. 
Henry Arthur Miner, Jr. 
William Herbert Moore. 
Guy Everett Morse. 
Dudley Roy Nowlin. 
David Austin Palmer. : 
Levi Wright Parker. 
Roland Folsom Pease. 
Arthur C. W. Peterson. 
Samuel Taylor Rich. 
Frederick Reed Rowe. 
Cyrus Johns Russell. 
Carl Howard Sanborn. 
Harold Lowd Smart. 
Harvey Ellsworth Snow. 
Arthur Strout. 
George Chester Swallow. 
Harold Arthur Tarbox. 
Harold Stanley Taylor. 
Bliss Eugene Taylor. 
Frederick Hayward True. 
Percy Greene Whitman. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



217 



TABLE 27. -GRAMMAR SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

The lack of a hall large enough to accommodate all the 
grammar school graduates and their friends compelled us to 
devote two evenings to the graduation exercises. Accordingly, 
Tuesday evening, June 22, and Wednesday evening, June 23, 
were set apart for the purpose. 

The following was the order of exercises on Tuesday 
evening : — 

Order of Exercises. 

Henry H. Folsom, Chairman of School Board, presiding. 
Overture. 

"Stradella." Flotow 

Boston Festival Orchestra. 

1. Prayer. 

Rev. W. C. Martin. 

2. *tSinging. 

(a) "The Song of the Skylark" (Four-Part Song), 

H. K. Hadley 
t(b) "Old Folks at Home" (Folk Song). Foster 

3. Address. 

Rev. William R. Newhall, D. D., of Somerville. 

4. 1" Singing. 

Unison Solo: "The Lost Chord." A. Sullivan 

5. Presentation of Diplomas to Graduates of the Prescott, Pope, 

Bell, Edgerly, and Glines Schools. 

6. tSinging. ! I 

Miserere and Prison Song, "Trovatore." Verdi 

7. Presentation of Diplomas to Graduates of the Forster and 

Bingham Schools. 

8. Singing. 

Vocal Waltz: "Blue Danube." , ' Strauss 

* All singing accompanied by the orchestra under the direction of S. Henry Had- 
ley, teacher of music in the schools. 

tOrchestration by S. Henry Hadley. 



Names of Graduates. 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 



Lyell E. T. Bachelder. 
Grace Evelyn Batson. 
William Drew Blunt. 
Mary E. Carlson. 
William Joseph Carroll. 
Alice Frances Chamberlain. 
Philip Sidney Davis. 
Burton E. W. Durgin. 
Melvin H. Durgin. 
Marian Jeannette Durning. 
Francis Joseph Fisher. 
Gertrude Frances Ford. 
Lena M. Hudd. 
Sarah Lufkin. 



Helen Gertrude Lynch. 
Alfred Freeman McAlpine. 
George Nicholas McMahon. 
Alice Augusta Meehan. 
Marian Evangeline Munroe. 
Kendall J. Richardson. 
Gladys Edwina Sanborn. 
Veronica Catherine Shea. 
Moses Harn>- Simon. 
Joseph P. Smith. 
Vera Smith. ; 

Wilford Almon Walker. 
Isabel Whiting. 



218 



ANNUAL BEPOBTS. 






POPE SCHOOL. 



Elsie M. Abrams. 
Lucy I. Ahearn. 
Lydia E. Baier. 
Thomas L. Brodcrick. 
1 lenry W. Carr. 
Fred E. Clements. 
Gladys M. Cole. 
Sadie A. Donald. 
Fanny B. Doty. 
Augustus A. Dntra. 
Viola I. Everett. 
Annie Fritz. 
1 [elen R. Geddes. 
Abbie G. Glover. 
I rene A. Griffin. 
Philip Gulla 
Robert A. I lenniston. 
Etole I ). 1 [ersey. 
Katherine A. Himelman. 
Albert A. Jordan. 
George L. Keefe. 
Amelia F. Kcllenberg. 
Sarah J. Kelley. 
John J. Kelliher. 



Rose L. Kelley. 
Gertrude A. Kurth. 
I lennan J. Lee. 
J. Samuel Lipkind. 
Margaret G. Lynch. 
Aha Margolis. 
William F. McKinnon. 
Man E. McLaughlin. 
Bstella M. McLean. 
James 1 1. McQuinn. 
Ella M. Mullane. 
Janus II. O'llara. 
Sarah E. IVarlman. 

Clarence B. Peck. 

Susie Phillips. 

Evelyn Pierce. 
Mary 1. Quirk. 
William Shea. 
Edna A. Smith. 
Grace Sullivan. 
Mary T. Taglino. 
Marion Towle. 
Dorothy Wells. 
Elizabeth II VVentworth. 



BELL SCHOOL. 



Gladys M. Babcock. 
Paul F. Bailey. 
Richard B. Barlow. 

Ailccn E. Blake. 
Paul G. Brack. 
Brown M. Caldwell. 
Percy G. Cameron. 
Walter G. Checver. 
Ethel Clarke. 
Mabel E. Clough. 
Charles D. Conte. 
Mildred M. dishing. 
Ralph L. Dillon. 
Lucy B. Eaton. 
Helen Farnham. 
Robert W. Farrell. 
Bernice M. Ford. 
Lester D. Gaffney. 
George V. Gow. 
Lena E. Grimes. 
Lillian M. Hildred. 
Eric A. Johnson. 
Edith M. Jordan. 
J. Robert Keefe. 
Irving E. Lewis. 
Alphonsus L. Madden. 
Gertrude M. Martin. 
Helen A. McCarthy. 
F. Lester McWilliams. 
Marguerite M. Morrison. 



Walter J. Mugford. 
1 lelena M. Muldoon. 
William II. Mullanny. 
C. Stuart Munro. 
Paul F. Nolan. 
Irene R. Orcutt. 
Marie E. Perkins. 
John S. H. Petit, Jr. 
Orrin J. Petrie. 
Chester G. Price. 
G. Martcnse Prince. 
Anthony T. Quinn. 
Ralph W. Rice. 
Walter P. Rice. 
Louise M. Rickard. 
Allies C. Riley. 
Margery A. Robinson. 
Lillian G. Rogers. 
Harold R. Sawyer. 
Editha A. Sharkey. 
Clark W. Shattuck. 
Robert L. Stevenson. 
Rea S. Vroom. 
Elsie G. Walker. 
Mary C. F. Walker. 
James P. Walsh. 
Marv A. Welch. 
Henrv B. Wing. 
Hazel B. Wright. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



219 



EDGERLY SCHOOL. 



Walter H. Arnold. 
E. Wilton Bearse. 
Thomas F. Bishop. 
Dorothy M. Blake. 
Charles H. Blake. 
Mary I. Canaway. 
Chester E. Carvell. 
Madelene C. Cater. 
Mary I. Clough. 
Hilda S. Corbin. 
Elizabeth L. Conghlin. 
Anna N. Coughlin. 
Joseph I. Crocker. 
Gladys G. Davis. 
George F. Dearborn. 
Helen M. Decelle. 
Ethel M. Dugan. 
Arthur W. Edwards. 
Roderick H. Eldridge. 
Joseph L. Ferguson. 
Richard J. Flaherty. 
Florence L. Frazer. 
Minott D. Given. 
Ernest E. Gustin. 
John E. Harrigan. 
Charles E. Hawkins. 
Louise C. Herrick. 
Clifford K. Herrick. 
Paul A. Hewes. 
Donald M.Hiltz. 
G. Charlotte Horton. 
Chester A. Horton. 
Albert Howard, Jr. 
Gene T. Kane. 
Edwin J. Keleher. 
John J. Kelley. 
Bertha F. Kerner. 
Bernice S. Lambert. 
Rosa LaTerza. 
Joseph M. Looney. 
Harold J. Lovering. 



Helen M. Lowther. 
Mary R. MacLeod. 
Reta P. MacQuarrie. 
Henry Martis. 
Carrie M. McCullough. 
Thomas J. Meaney. 
Theodore P. Messer. 
Josephine V. Miller. 
Mary A. Moore. 
Florence H. Morrison. 
C. Evelyn Morton. 
Pauline N. Murray. 
Edward J. Murray. 
George N. Musgrove. 
Seward E. Nichols. 
George C. Noyce. 
Josephine J. O'Connor. 
John E. O'Donnell. 
A. Myrtle Oliver. 
William A. O'Neil. 
Richard W. O'Neil. 
Elmer H. Phelps. 
Charles B. Pickering. 
John Quinn. 
William F. Ricketson. 
Mary E. Riley. 
Edward J. Rockett. 
Grace L. Russell. 
Helen M. Russell. 
Annie E. Ryan. 
Ralph E. Sliney. 
John R. Spiers. 
Ruth R. W. Stinson. 
Ruth N. St. Onge. 
Frank J. Toomey. 
Gladys I. Towle. 
Ruth H. Wentworth. 
Roy L. Whiddon. 
Ruby S. White. 
Joseph S. Wilmarth. 
G. Carlton Wiswell. 



GLINES SCHOOL. 



M. Adeline Barnes. 
Myer Benjamin. 
Rosa Benjamin. 
J. Howard Bergmann. 
Vanessa L. Blaisdell. 
Leon E. Blake. 
Mabel Bourne. 
Anna E. Burbank. 
Pericle P. Cadario. 
Lewis O. Card. 
Rita J. E. Cliff. 
George G. Cox. 
Annie Doctoroff. 
George W. Dorey. 
Beatrice A. Greer. 



Edith B. Harrison. 
Myer H. Hillson. 
Helen F. Hilton. 
J. Noble Hodgdon. 
Myrle A. Holmes. 
Joseph W. Hurley. 
Mary C. Hurley. 
Emily L. Johnson. 
William Johnston, Jr. 
E. Ralph Kenneson. 
Josephine M. Kirkland. 
Lester A. Kirkpatrick. 
George A. Lantz. 
Ernest C. Larrabee. 
Walter Larson. 



220 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Fannie M. Lipshires. 
Isabelle S. Marchant. 
Louis A. Marchant. 
H. Marie Mason. 
Alden Pratt. 
Ruth W. Russell. 
Clifford W. Seale. 



Bernard V. Shea. 
Edwin P. Shea. 
Jennie W. Sherman. 
Gertrude F. Webber. 
Ray I. Whittemore. 
Walter B. Wiley. 



FORSTER SCHOOL. 



Chester E. Ames. 
Hubert E. Ames. 
Carolyn Elizabeth Armitage. 
Edith M. Bakin. 
Ra3^mond Harding Baxter. 
Mary E. Bragan. 
Caleb J. Buffum. 
Howard K. Burbank. 
Katherine Caffrey. 
Herbert P. Campbell. 
Beulah C. Church. 
J. Madeline Coy. 
Harold E. Cook. 
Thomas L. Cronin. 
Mariner S. Crosby. 
Elmer H. Currier. 
Millie C. Davis. 
Ellen G. Desmond. 
Beatrice M. Dickinson. 
Vincent Dugmore. 
Paul H. Farrow. 
Mary C. Fielding. 
Charles F. Flammand. 
Martha L. Freeze. 
Sarah L. Gay. 
Lillian E. Gerrior. 
Molly Adelaide Gilman. 
Ruth M. Giles. 
Vernon Orville Giles. 
Francis William Goguen. 
Clarence E. Haines. 
Ethel L. Hamm. 
Kenneth B. Hayward. 
Florence M. Hazlett. 
Marion G. Higham. 
Virginia M. Johnson. 
Gladys E. Jones. 



Marcia L. Jones. 
C. Howard Kidder. 
Mildred L. Knight. 
Harold F. Lebert. 
Sadie M. Lomasney. 
Gladys de Almeida Mackay. 
Thomas Joseph Madigan. 
Caroline F. McCarthy. 
Allan D. Mclnnis. 
Grace M. McKenna. 
Arthur H. Meecham. 
Roy W. Mosher. 
Marguerite A. Murray. 
Charles Joseph Nangle. 
Martin L. Paulson. 
William A. Reidt. 
Emil G. Richter. 
James Edward Rose. 
Viola Saville. 
Berry M. Sharp. 
Charles F. Sharkey. 
Robert L. Smith. 
George Harold Souther. 
Helen M. Strom. 
Louise M. Sweeney. 
George W. Tarbell. 
Fred M. Thomas. 
Clarence E. Turner. 
Helen Ruth Turner. 
Phoebe W. Underhill. 
Luther K. Wedgwood. 
Charles Theo Wheeler. 
Fannie E. Willis. 
Margaret P. Woodberry. 
Harlan Noyes Worthley. 
George S. Wyman. 



BINGHAM SCHOOL. 



Dora Baker. 
Francis L. Cahill. 
Daniel J. Curtin. 
Gertrude E. De Lorme. 
Walter W. Denney. 
Mary K. Doherty. 
Mary E. Doherty. 
Julia E. Finn. 
Francis L. Gallen. 
John F. Gallen. 
Mark L. Gannon, 



Thomas J. Garrick. 
Mary T. Gurvin. 
George J. Hallion. 
Catharine M. Hanley. 
Harry F. Hughes. 
Mary I. Kelley. 
Margaret M. Kelley. 
Cornelius P. Lacey. 
Edwin H. Lombard. 
Angelo Luciano. 
Alice Macdonald. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



221 



John P. McGoldrick. 
Mary L. McKenna. 
Walter J. McKenna. 
John L. Mellen. 
Mary V. Meskill. 
John J. Morrissey. 
Lillian E. Murley. 



Pierce L. Murphy. 
Francis J. O'Gara. 
Thomas E. Ryan. 
William F. Scully. 
Anastasia L. Steadman. 
Thomas M. Sweeney. 
Richard J. Trum. 



The following" was the order of exercises for Wednesday 
evening : — 

Order of Exercises. 

George C. Mahoney, Vice-Chairman of School Board, presiding. 

Overture. 

"Stradella." Flotow 

Boston Festival Orchestra. 

1. Prayer. 

Rev. Harley D. Maxwell. 

2. *tSinging. 

(a) "The Song of the Skylark" (Four-Part Song), 

H. K. Hadley 
t(b) "Old Folks at Home" (Folk Song). Foster 

3. Address. 

Rev. J. Vanor Garton, of Somerville. 

4. fSinging. 

Unison Solo: "The Lost Chord." A. Sullivan 

5. Presentation of Diplomas to Graduates of the Knapp, Carr, 

Morse, and Brown Schools. 

6. fSinging. 

Miserere and Prison Song, "Trovatore." Verdi 

7. Presentation of Diplomas to Graduates of the Highland and 

Hodgkins Schools. 

8. Singing. 

Vocal Waltz: "Blue Danube." Strauss 

•All singing accompanied by the orchestra under the direction of S. Henry Had- 
ley, teacher of music in the schools. 

tOrchestration by S. Henry Hadley. 



Names of Graduates. 



KNAPP SCHOOL. 



Alexander A. Anderson, 
Harold J. Anderson. 
Emilia A. Balogh. 
Grace I. Barker. 
Lillian L. Barron. 
Annie L. Bennett. 
John S. Bettencourt. 
Harman A. Borgstrom. 
Albert L. Bradley. 
J. Clinton Bradley. 
Earle W. Chambers. 
James F. Coakley. 
S. Gertrude Collins. 
C. Howard Collmer. 
Manuel F. Cunha. 
Clarence Dalrymple. 
Viola F. Dean. 
Henrietta L. Delay. 
Katherine F. Dewire. 



Jr. 



Willard J. Dondale. 
Edward J. Doucet. 
Mildred R. Evans. 
James M. Fennelly. 
Lewis Freedman. 
M. Edith Glynn. 
William J. Grady. 
Ada E. Groombridge. 
Frank J. Hadley. 
Andrew Hambro. 
Mae F. Harrington. 
Charles F. Hellmann. 
Frederick W. Hill. 
Elsie M. Hoffstedt. 
Alexander J. Hyde. 
Matilda M. Irwin. 
Carrie A. Jarvis. 
John A. Johnson. 
Jennie L. Kilroy. 



222 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Emma B. Korman. 
I. Mabel Leary. 
Ethel A. Lord. 
Ralph B. MacCutcheon. 
Mary I. MacFarlane. 
Frederick C. Madden.. 
Margaret E. Maguire. 
John L. McDonough. 
William R. McNulty. 
Raymond H. Merrill. 
Matilda R. Munroe. 
Charles M. O'Connor. 
George M. O'Neil. 
Lillian F. O'Neil. 
Isabelle M. Paz. 
Jessie A. Rapson. 



Charles M. Rawson. 
Flora E. Remick. 
Frieda G. B. Rinaldi. 
Bertha E. Rogge. 
Adele Sampson. 
Agnes E. Sharry. 
Florence G. Simmons. 
J. Louise Starr. 
Anna L. Streb. 
Edward F. Sullivan. 
F. Charles T. Sullivan. 
Margaret M. Sweeney. 
Esther M. Tracy. 
Florence M. White. 
Mildred J. White. 
Velma I. Zeigler. 



CARR SCHOOL. 



James Arrington, Jr. 
Charlotte E. Baker. 
Florence Blair. 
Katherine Bowlby. 
Thomas J. Breslin. 
Paul B. Brine. 
Daniel Caless. 
Ruth A. Cambridge. 
Mildred P. Carr. 
L. Eugenie Carter. 
Earle R. Clark. 
Gladys C. Coker. 
Edward V. Colbert. 
Edgar D. Creighton. 
A. Ralph Crosby. 
William H. Crowell. 
Harold J. Daykin. 
John F. Donahue. 
Mary T. Donovan. 
S. Frances Dow. 
Carl J. Dowd. 
John B. Dupont. 
P. Aubrey Elston. 
Helen M. Farr. 
Nellie M. Forg. 
Lucy M. Gibson. 
Ethel M. Gross. 
Harold Hamlin. 
William J. Hartley. 
Beatrice I. Hepworth. 
Annie T. Holmes. 
Frances L. Homer. 
Pearl I. Hunt. 



Elman C. Hunter. 
Florence M. T. Jackson. 
William C. Jones. 
Katharine J. Kiley. 
Helen F. "Kilty. 
Florence M. Landini. 
John J. Lavey. 
Frances H. Lawler. 
Ruth A. Lovequist. 
Dorothy L. Lundgren. 
Alice M. McGrath. 
Francis J. Maloney. 
Bruce Mitchell. 
Joseph L. Murphy. 
Winnifred S. Mustoe. 
Ellen C. Nelson. 
Edith A. Olson. 
May A. Parslow. 
Emily I. Pepper. 
John L. Porter. 
Harold I. Prebensen. 
Helen F. Roche. 
Catharine L. Rose. 
Annie H. Smith. 
Ruth F. Sterling. 
Wallace W. Stuart. 
John J. Sullivan. 
James H. Thacher. 
Delina R. Theriault. 
Florence M. Theriault. 
Elizabeth Thorpe. 
Thomas A. W T est. 
Raymond W. Wheeler. 



Warren E. Bolton. 
Louis J. Bragole. 
William O. Brooks. 
Paul T. Budgell. 
Edward M. Bullard. 
Elsiena G. Campbell. 



MORSE SCHOOL. 

Oscar H. Cederlund. 
Carl Collingham. 
Frank C. Davis. 
Grace E. Dodge. 
Frank B. Dyson. 
Douglas Fleming. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



223 



Harold L. Gardner. 
Ruth E. Gardner. 
Margaret T. Gillis. 
Eva M. Givan. 
J. Hamilton Givan, Jr. 
Esther Hammond. 
Benedict Hemmerlin. 
Elizabeth M. Johnson. 
Agnes M. Keating. 
Herbert S. Kingsman. 
Evelyn M. Lakin. 
Blanche H. Lanman. 
Kittie L. Martin. 
John J. McCarthy. 
Mildred B. Merrill. 
Mildred E. Nolan. 



Gerard O'Brien. 
Lucy M. Peterson. 
Chester A. Ryder. 
Ruth L. Sawyer. 
Marguerite H. Sears. 
Esther M. Sharkey. 
Madeline E. Simmons. 
Pauline A. Stevens. 
Ruth M. Stevens. 
Mildred M. F. Sullivan. 
Mary W. Toomey. 
Helena L. Trolsaas. 
Lillian G. Vears. 
Mary H. Vears. 
Helen M. Wheeler. 
Ruth G. Woodward. 



BROWN SCHOOL. 



Edith C. Anderson. 
Mildred E. Austin. 
Marion L. Baker. 
Herbert W. Barrett. 
Miriam Bernson. 
Albert H. Bradhurst. 
Mildred E. Brown. 
Rose I. Byrnes. 
James T. Cronin. 
Horace J. Day. 
William W. Dougall. 
I. Marguerite Elliott. 
E. Mabel Elliott. 
Edith G. Forbes. 
John Forbes. 
Wilfred J. Fuller. 
Florence G. Grout. 
Howard S. Hanna. 
Henry J. Hartman. 
Edith Higgins. 
Florence Higgins. 
Maurice S. Hutchins. 



Ralph D. Kinney. 
Gladys E. Mackinnon. 
Loretta M. McDonough. 
Elizabeth T. Montgomery. 
Marjorie A. Moore. 
Leon T. Matthews. 
Annie F. O'Neill. 
Adrienne A. Paradis. 
Douglas R. Pollard. 
Pearl Rand. 
Frederick O. Rice. 
Ethel M. Rice. 
David A. Rubinstein. 
Gertrude B. Smith. 
Adolph R. Soderberg. 
Jesse L. Stewart. 
Wesley R. Thomas. 
Harold F. Tupper. 
Margaret J. E. Tyson. 
Norman L. Wright. 
Lena R. Wilansky. 



HIGHLAND SCHOOL. 



Helen F. Abbott. 
Paul D. Ackerman. 
Dora C. Anderson. 
Gladys E. Arrington. 
Edward T. Baker. 
George H. Baker. 
Arthur S. Billings. 
Mildred I. Bowlby. 
Helen S. Bowman. 
Gladys I. Chase. 
Sylvia M. Cleveland. 
Ernest G. Collupy. 
Wallace T. Crispin. 
Ralph H. Cutter. 
Lettie M. Dingwell. 
Marion H. Dion. 
G. Clyde Dickson. 



Mabel E. Dickson. 
Marion L. Flagg. 
Beatrice D. Fillmore. 
Charles N. Field. 
John F. Foster. 
Alfred F. Fox. 
T. Willard Fuller. 
Frank H. Gale. 
Gerald F. Gillis. 
Maud E. Girard. 
Rose M. Gnecco. 
Phyllis G. Grace. 
Marie I. Hansen. 
Iva A. Hare. 
Arthur A. Harlow. 
Ethel B. Heald. 
Claire E. Honors. 



m 



ANNUAL EEPOETS. 



Mildred B. Horsman. 
Bernice E. Hunnewell. 
Reta Hunnewell. 
Charles F. Hunnewell. 
Roger Hunnewell. 
Walter S. Ireland. 
Mae Innis. 
Charles J. Jesson. 
Herman W. Jones. 
Grace C. Kelley. 
Alva M. Kennedy. 
Harold M. Kirker. 
Marion Knowles. 
Stanley V. Lane. 
Ruth G. Lane. 
Bertha L. Lewis. 
Grace M. Lewis. 
Helen G. Macauley. 
M. Edith MacPhee. 
Frances B. Macy. 
Wilbur B. Maskell. 
Anna L. McCarthy. 
Allan M. McGinn. 
Amy E. McKinley. 
Bessie B. McGray. 
H. Doane McGray. 
Isabel A. McPhail. 
Mary W. Merrv. 
Greta W. Miles. 
Trueman G. Morison. 
Hazel L. O'Brien. 



Kenneth P. Palmer. 
Jess D. Pease. 
Edward S. Pettes. 
Eudora K. Pettes. 
Alma L. Porter. 
Lester R. Pollard. 
Helen W. Pond. 
Florence S. Prescott. 
M. Helen Prescott. 
Albertine A. Rich. 
W. Creighton Richardson. 
Dorothy Rosenauer. 
Ellsworth T. Simpson. 
Marion K. Slade. 
Gladys M. Smith. 
Lewis H. Smith. 
Ena B. Stack. 
Earl C. Steeves. 
William D. Swain. 
Walter P. Sweet. 
Rachel Stevens. 
M. Stella E. Traverse. 
Elsa B. Tholander. 
Louise M. Truesdell. 
Rebecca Tutein. 
Otis Wellington. 
Frederick T. Williams. 
Ethel D. Wilson. 
George E. Wilson. 
Winifred W. Yorke. 



HODGKINS SCHOOL. 



Dorothy M. Allen. 
Ralph A. Armour. 
Ruth M. Bailey. 
Ragnar W. Berquist. 
Irving M. Bickford. 
Margaret L. Blanchard. 
Marion L. Brown. 
Erminie M. Burtnett. 
Louise M. Bryan. 
L. Minot Cheever. 
S. May Chute. 
Lucile H. Coaker. 
Elsie L. Cobb. 
Gladys I. Cushing. 
Marion B. Davis. 
Florence M. Drinkwater. 
Edwin S. Dutton. 
Anna E. Erikson. 
Mattie E. Exum. 
Doris M. Fitch. 
William J. Fraser. 
Chester F. Galloupe. 
Elsie B. Goddard. 
Gladys M. Goodwin. 
Ruth M. Gorton. 
Arthur R. Gould. 
Eleanor Greenwood. 
Sherman C. Griffiths. 



Chester W. Hadley. 
Ralph S. Hadley. 
K. Olive Hirst. 
Edith N. Home. 
C. Sumner Hunter. 
Florence E. Ivester. 
Lena G. Ivester. 
Iola W. Johnson. 
Harold B. Leland. 
Florence E. Libby. 
Howard E. Merrill. 
Howard B. Mills. 
Robert W. Mulloney. 
Milton B. Neal. 
Daniel N. Pearson. 
Olive C. Perkins. 
Alma C. Pigon. 
Madeleine C. Pipe. 
Alice M. Piper. 
Arthur C. Reade. 
Harold D. Rice. 
Paul F. Robinson. 
Josephine H. Rourke. 
W. Franklin Terry. 
Adeline T. Valente. 
Florence M. Wallstrom. 
Homer A. White. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



225 



TABLE 28,— ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOL BOARD, 1910. 



School Committee. 

Henry H. Folsom, Chairman 

George C. Mahoney, Vice-Chairman 

Members. 

Terra expires 
EX-OFFICIIS. January. 

John M. Woods, Mayor, 47 Spring street. 1911 

Ray R. Rideout, President Board of Aldermen, 22 Dana street. 1911 



WARD ONE. 



Emory F. Chaffee, 
Mrs. Mary G. Whiting, 

Thomas M. Clancy, 
Daniel H. Bradley, 

Wilbur S. Clarke, 
George E. Whitaker, 

George W. Foster, 
Charles A. Kirkpatrick, 



J. Walter Sanborn, 
Henry H. Folsom, 



Leonard H. Pote, 
Frederick A. P, Fiske, 



Mrs. Lilla H. Tainter, 
George C. Mahoney, 



109 Pearl street. 

61 Mt. Vernon street. 


1911 
1912 


WARD TWO. 




52 Springfield street. 
19 Concord avenue. 


1911 
1912 


WARD THREE. 




40 Vinal avenue. 
75 Walnut street. 


1911 
1912 


WARD FOUR. 




7 Evergreen avenue. 
27 Sewall street. 


1911 
1912 


WARD FIVE. 




183 Central street. 
103 Central street. 


1911 
1912 


WARD SIX. 




694 Broadway. 
44 Cherry street. 


1911 
1912 


WARD SEVEN. 




46 Chester street. 
97 College avenue. 


1911 

1912 



Superintendent of Schools. 

Charles S. Clark. 

Office: City Hall Annex, Highland avenue. 

Residence:. 82 Munroe street. 

The Superintendent's office will be open on school days from 8 to 
5; Saturdays, 8 to 10. His office hours are from 4 to 5 on school days, 
and 8 to 9 on Saturdays. 

Office telephone, 314; house telephone, 12. 

Superintendent's clerks: — 

Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland avenue. 

Mildred A. Merrill, 26 Cambria street. 



Board Meetings. 

January 31. April 25. September 26. 

February 28. May 30. October 31. 

March 28. June 27. - November 28. 

8.15 o'clock. 



December 23. 
December 30. 



226 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TABLE 28.— ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOL BOARD, 1910— Concluded. 



Standing Committees, 1910. 

Note. — The member first named is chairman. 

High Schools. — Sanborn, Mahoney, Clancy, Clarke, Foster, Pote, Mrs. 
Whiting. 

District I. — Chaffee, Mrs. Whiting, Foster. 

PRESCOTT, HANSCOM, DAVIS, BENNETT. 

District II. — Clancy, Bradley, Clarke. 

KNAPP, PERRY, BAXTER. 

District III.— Clarke, Whitaker, Mrs. Whiting. 

POPE, BELL, CUMMINGS. 

District IV. — Foster, Kirkpatrick, Chaffee. 

EDGERLY, GLINES. 

District V. — Sanborn, Folsom, Kirkpatrick. ■ 

FORSTER, BINGHAM. 

District VI. — Pote, Fiske, Folsom. 

CARR, MORSE, PROCTOR, DURELL, BURNS, BROWN. 

District VII. — Mrs. Tainter, Mahoney, Fiske. 

HIGHLAND, HODGKINS, LINCOLN, LOWE. 

Additional School Accommodations. — Mahoney, Sanborn, Clancy, 
Clarke, Kirkpatrick, Fiske, Chaffee, Woods, Rideout. 

Evening Schools. — Fiske, Whitaker, Mrs. Tainter. 

Finance. — Chaffee, Bradley, Whitaker, Woods, Rideout. 

Industrial Education. — Foster, Clarke, Sanborn, Kirkpatrick, Mrs. 
Whiting. 

Medical Inspection. — Pote, Mahoney, Mrs. Whiting. 

Music. — Mrs. Whiting, Bradley, Folsom. 

Private Schools. — Clancy, Pote, Kirkpatrick. 

Repairs of School Buildings. — Folsom, Foster, Mrs. Tainter. 

Rules and Regulations. — Bradley, Fiske, Mahoney. 

Salaries. — Kirkpatrick, Whitaker, Clancy. 

Supplies. — Clarke, Chaffee, Sanborn. 

Text-Books and Courses of Study. — Whitaker, Chaffee, Bradley, Kirk- 
patrick, Folsom, Fiske, Mrs. Tainter. 

Vacation Schools. — Mrs. Tainter, Foster, Pote. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



227 



TABLE 29.— TEACHERS IN SERVICE JANUARY, 1910. 



Namb and Residence. 



LATIN HIGH SCHOOL. 

Central Hill. 

George L. Baxter, Head Master, 27 Warren Avenue 
Frank M. Hawes, Master, 257 School Street 
Charles T. Murray, Master, 28 Franklin Street . 
G. M. Hosmer, Sub-Master, 13 Arlington Street . 
W. D. Sprague, Sub-Master, 16 Pleasant Avenue 
F. H. Wilkins, Sub-Master, 61 Boston Street 
Alfred W. Dickinson ...... 

Frances W. Kaan, 133 Central Street . 

Lena Gilbert, 51 Elmwood Street .... 

Eudora Morey, 17 Batavia Street, Boston 

Mabel G. Curtis, 49-A Trowbridge Street, Cambridge 

F. Gertrude Perkins, 17 Pleasant Avenue 

Natalie A. Smith, 60 Albion Street 

Mary Cliff, 427 Shawmut Avenue, Boston . 

Grace E. W. Sprague, 888 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge 

Kate M. Monro, 156 School Street 

ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL. 

Central Hill. 

John A. Avery, Head Master, 22 Dartmouth Street 

Everett W. Tuttle, Master, 62 Highland Avenue . 

Harry L. Jones, 137 Powder House Boulevard 

Howard W. Poor, 27 Mt. Vernon Street, Reading 

Harry F. Sears, 44 Orris Street, Melrose Highlands 

Frederick O. Smith, 135 Powder House Boulevard 

William W. Obear, 69 Walnut Street . 

Laurence A. Sprague, 17 Perkins Street, West Newton 

John M. Jaynes, 29 Putnam Street 

Archibald S. Bennett, 12 Grand View Avenue 

Stephen E. Wright, Y. M. C. A. Building . 

Frank A. Scott, 40 Dover Street 

Roy W. Hatch, 80 Lowden Avenue 

Augustus B. Tripp, 67 Wallace Street . 

A. Marion Merrill, 66 Highland Avenue 

Mrs. Mary C. Thurston, 271 Medford Street 

Harriet E. Tuell, 66 Highland Avenue . 

Helen L. Follansbee, 40 Vinal Avenue . 

Elizabeth Campbell, 15 Pleasant Avenue 

Mrs. Jessamine D. Wolcott, Jason Terrace, Arlington 

A. Laura Batt, 66 Highland Avenue 

M. Helen Teele, 11 Jason Street, Arlington . 

Clara A. Johnson, 177 Central Street . 

Bertha P. Marvel, 62 Highland Avenue 

Elizabeth H. Hunt, Cambridge 

Bessie D. Davis, 13 Mt. Vernon Street 

Ella D. Gray, 147 Walnut Street . 

Nina A. Cummings, 47 Wallace Street . 

Nellie H. Swift, 79 Boston Street . 

Ruth Tousey, 106 Professors Row 

*Anna Pushee, 10 Harvard Place . 

Bessie L. Forbes, 92 Orchard Street . 

Bertha A. Raymond, 85 Central Street . 

Blanche S. Bradford, 161 Summer Street 

Grace E. Burroughs, 83 Munroe Street 

Mabel Butman, 15 Prospect Hill Avenue 

Mary E. Hadley, 46 Westminster Avenue, Arlington Heights 

Grace Gatchell, 60 Vinal Avenue . 

Winifred E. Howe, 60 Vinal Avenue 

Flora E. Anderson, 8-A Hancock Street 

A. Marguerite Browne, Cambridge 

Annie C. Woodward, 150 School Street 

Cara F. Dillingham, 31 Warren Avenue 

Mabell M. Ham, 41 Boston Street 




$3,000 

2.000 

1,900 

1,500 

1,700 

1,600 

200 

1,200 

1,000 

900 

950 

900 

950 

900 

900 

800 



$2,800 

1,950 

1,700 

1,700 

1,700 

1,700 

1,700 

1.300 

LlOO 

1,500 

1,300 

1,300 

1,300 

800 

1,200 

1,000 

1,000 

1,150 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

950 

900 

900 

900 

900 

900 

900 

900 

900 

900 

900 

900 

900 

900 

950 

900 

850 

700 

750 

700 



Began 
Service. 



1867 
1879 

1887 
1901 
1906 
1906 
1909 
1882 
1892 
1874 
1903 
1906 
1909 
1908 
1908 
1909 



1895 
1895 
1896 
1896 
1901 
1904 
1906 
1906 
1901 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1895 
1898 
1897 
1900 
1902 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1897 
1899 
1908 
1901 
1901 
1903 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1899 
1900 
1903 
1906 
1906 
1907 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1908 
1906 
1909 
1906 



*Leave of absence. 



22S ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TABLE 29.— Teachers in Service January, 1910.— Continued. 



Grade. 


Name and Residence. 


Salary. 


Began 
Service. 




(WILLIAM H.) PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 








Pearl and Myrtle Streets. 






9. 


Samuel A. Johnson, Master. 83 Thurston Street 


$1,900 


1893 


9. 


Elizabeth M. Warren, 46 Vinal Avenue 


775 


1897 


8. 


Susie M. Hosmer, 31 Thurston Street 


700 


1899 


7. 


Emma M. Cate, 15 Fletcher Street, Winchester . 


700 


1882 


7. 
6. 
6. 


Edyth M. Grimshaw, Readville ..... 


700 


1909 


Florence A. Eaton, 17 Pleasant Avenue 


700 


1906 


5. 


Georgiana Smith, 61 Pearl Street ..... 


700 


1906 


5. 


Georgia P. Wardwell, 21 Pleasant Avenue . 


700 


190c5 


4. 


Clara Taylor, 36 Flint Street ...... 


700 


1871 


3. 


Elizabeth L. Marvin, 13 Pleasant Avenue . 


700 


1S98 


2. 


Louise E. Pratt, 110 Pearl Street 


700 


1889 


1. 


A. Louise Bean, 38 Pearl Street 

SANFORD HANSCOM SCHOOL. 
Webster and Rush Streets. 


700 


1904 


6. 


Elizabeth M. Collins, Principal, 62 Highland Avenue 


$950 


1901 


Asst. 


Agness M. Travis, Winthrop Highlands 


700 


1908 


5. 


Mary V. Williams, 73 High Rock Street, Lynn . 


700 


1908 


4. 


Mary B. Nelson, 21 Pleasant Avenue .... 


700 


190S 


3. 


Frances E. Robinson, 89 Cross Street .... 


700 


1906 


3. 


Jennie M. Twiss, 67 Berkeley Street .... 


700 


1903 


2. 


Maude A. Nichols, 15 Pleasant Avenue 


700 


1906 


2. 


Mrs. Emma B. Jones, 18 Sargent Avenue . 


700 


1889 


1. 


Phenie L. DuGar, 46 Vinal Avenue .... 


700 


1907 


1. 


Mattie L. Littlefield, 65 Glen Street .... 


700 


1897 


Kir.d'n. 


Elizabeth J. Baker, 78 Highland Avenue . 


600 


1907 


Asst. 


Florence M. Shaw, 44 Benton Road .... 

JOSHUA H. DAVIS SCHOOL. 
Tufts Street. 


275 


1909 


3. 
4. 
2. 


Mary A. Holt, Principal, 72 Boston Street . 


$775 


1899 


Carrie T. Lincoln, 79 Marshall Street .... 


700 


1S93 


1. 


P. A. Merritt, 96 Oxford Street 

CLARK BENNETT SCHOOL. 
Poplar and Maple Streets. 


700 


1S85 


5, 6. 


Annie E. McCarty, Principal, 24 Stone Avenue . 


$1,000 


1SS0 


Asst. 


Kate B. Gifford, 67 Columbus Avenue .... 


700 


1902 


5. 


Edith A. Maxwell, 22 Aldersey Street .... 


700 


1906 


4. 


Katherine Pike, 72 Rush Street 


700 


1906 


4. 


Marie Neis, 27 Gibbens Street ..... 


700 


1903 


3. 


Nellie F. Eaton, 15 Pleasant Avenue .... 


700 


1906 


3. 


Katharine C. Connollv, 101 School Street . 


700 


1S97 


2. 


Eleanor W. Nolan, 72 Rush Street .... 


700 


1906 


2 


Mrs. Nettie L. Fay, 67 Walnut Street .... 


700 


1901 


1. 


Isadore E. Taylor, 36 Flint Street .... 


700 


1883 


1. 


Bertha M. Martindale, 21 Highland Avenue 


700 


1902 


1. 


Mrs. Cora B. Gowen, 61 Walnut Street 


700 


1906 


Kind'n. 


Caroline G. Baker, 40 Benton Road .... 


600 


1896 


Asst. 


Alice M. Saben, 110 Pearl Street 


425 


1903 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



229 



TABLE 29- Teachers In Service January, 1910.— Continued. 



Grade. 


Name and Residence. 


Salary. 


Began 
Service. 




GEORGE L. BAXTER SCHOOL. 








Bolton Street. 






5. 

4. 


Etta R. Holden, 12 Warren Avenue .... 


$700 


1908 


3. 


Julia A. Mahoney, 16 Parker Street .... 


700 


1904 


2. 


Agatha G. F. Commins, 24 Hanson Street . 


700 


1901 


1. 


Maria D. McLeod, 1 Highland Park, Cambridgeport . 


700 


1906 


Asst. 


Lynda V. Merrill, 11 Marion Street .... 


425 


1908 


Kind'n. 


Eleanor A. Connor, 59 Church Street .... 


600 


1903 


Asst. 


Mary T. McCarthy, 24 Preston Road .... 

OREN S. KNAPP SCHOOL. 
Concord Avenue. 


350 


1908 


9. 


John Sherburne Emerson, Master, 3 Preston Road, 


$1,900 


1894 


9,8. 


Mary J. Malaney, 18 Pleasant Avenue 


700 


1908 


8. 


Nellie Theresa McCarthy, Woburn .... 


700 


1909 


8. 


Minnie A. Holden, 19 Concord Avenue 


700 


1906 


7. 


Clara B. Parkhurst, 22 Highland Avenue 


700 


1889 


7. 


*Clara B. Sackett, 91 Summer Street .... 


700 


1891 


7,6. 


Edith Hersey, 154 Washington Avenue, Chelsea 


700 


1899 


6. 


Florence M. Hopkins, 50 Craigie Street 


700 


1907 


5. 


Daisy King, 25 Alexander Street, Dorchester 


700 


1905 


4. 


Annie E. Robinson, 61 Preston Road .... 


700 


1876 


3. 


L. Gertrude Allen, 230 Washington Street . 


700 


1884 


2. 


Minnie Alice Perry, 267 Medford Street 


700 


1891 


1. 


Alice L. Reid, 37 Spring Street 

ALBION A. PERRY SCHOOL. 
Washington Street, near Dane. 


525 


1908 


6. 


Catherine E. Sweeney, Principal, 633 Broadway 


$825 


1901 


5. 




500 


1909 


4. 


Irene Vincent, 47 Vinal Avenue ..... 


700 


1903 


3. 


Mary G. Blackwell, 45 Ibbetson Street .... 


700 


1900 
1899 


2. 


Charlotte Holmes, 9 Greene Street .... 


700 


1. 


Mrs. Sarah E. Murphy, 21 Fountain Avenue 


700 


1906 


Asst. 


Nona Blackwell, 45 Ibbetson Street .... 

CHARLES G. POPE SCHOOL. 

Washington and Boston Streets. 


525 


1908 


9. 


George M. Wadsworth, Master, Whitman 


$1,900 


1891 


9. 


Florence A. Chaney, 56 Boston Street .... 


775 


1892 


8,9. 


Alice I. Norcross, 28 Russell Avenue, Watertown 


725 


1885 


8. 


Harriet M. Clark, 10 Vernon Street, West Medford 


700 


1893 


7. 


Mrs. Blanche G. North, 103 Kidder Avenue 


700 


1893 


7. 


M. Abbie Tarbett, 11 Washington Street, Stoneham . 


700 


1906 


7,6. 


Minnie A. Blood, 63 Walnut Street .... 


700 


1897 


6. 


Lena F. Shaw, 23 Abbott Street, Dorchester 


700 


1905 


5. 


Lizzie W. Parkhurst, 22 Highland Avenue . 


700 


1885 


4. 


Annie G. Sheridan, 84 Prospect Street 


700 


1886 


3. 


Mabel K. Davis, 11 Harvard Place 


700 


1904 


2. 


Florence E. Locke, 9 Prospect Hill Avenue . 


700 


1899 


1. 


Alice B. Frye, 6 Chester Street, Maiden 


700 


1904 



*Leave of absence, 



230 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1910. — Continued. 



Grade. 


Name and Residence. 


Salary. 


Began 
Service. 




LUTHER V. BELL SCHOOL. 








Vinal Avenue. 






9. 


Harlan P. Knight, Master, 61 Putnam Street . 


$1,900 


1S97 


9. 


Alice L. Davis, 40 Vinal Avenue .... 


775 


1895 


9,8. 


Grace E. Weeks, 32 Vinal Avenue .... 


725 


1899 


8. 


Rena S. Hezelton, 26 Cambria Street .... 


650 


1909 


7. 


Eva R. Barton, Stoneham ...... 


700 


1904 


6,7. 


Mary F. Osborne, 67 Boston Street .... 


700 


1908 


6. 


Mrs. Mabel T. Totman, 64 Vinal Avenue . 


700 


1893 


5. 


Maribelle Curtis, 64 Vinal Avenue . ■ . . 


700 


1895 


5. 


Emma F. Schuch, 25 Tufts Street .... 


700 


1874 


4. 


Ella H. Buckman, 211 Summer Street .... 


700 


1897 


3. 


Helen C. Gray, 10 Gardner Street, Cambridge . 


700 


1908 


2. 


Blanche L. Paine, 11 Landers Street .... 


700 


1905 


1. 


Lucia Alger, 29 Columbus Avenue .... 

(JOHN A.) CUMMINGS SCHOOL. 
School Street, near Highland Avenue. 


700 


1889 


8. 


Fannie L. Gwynne, Principal, 65 School Street . 


$775 


18S6 


4. 


Daisy W. Cushman, 40 Vinal Avenue .... 


700 


1906 


2. 


Angeline Cann, Hotel Woodbridge .... 


700 


1S97 


1. 


Elizabeth L. Hersey, 11 East Newton Street, Boston . 

(JOHN G.) EDGERLY SCHOOL. 
Cross and Bonair Streets. 


700 


1896 


9. 


Charles E. Brainard, Master, 82 Munroe Street 


$1,900 


1889 


9. 


M. Eva Warren, 151 Walnut Street .... 


775 


1906 


9.8. 


Annie L. Dimpsey, Hotel Woodbridge 


725 


1891 


8. 


Mary E. Richardson, 14 Stickney Avenue . 


700 


1893 


8. 


Mabel Washburn, 267 Medford Street .... 


700 


1906 


7. 


Mabel C. Mansfield, 14 Stickney Avenue . 

Isabelle M. Gray, 23 Webster Street .... 


700 


1893 


7. 


700 


1897 


6. 


Edith M. Snell, 4 Vine Street, Melrose 


700 


1900 


5. 


G. Hortense Pentecost, 26 Walter Street 


700 


1905 


4. 


J. Louise Smith, 196 Washington Street, Lynn . 


700 


1896 


8. 


Lillian Nealley, 109 Glen Street 


700 


1882 


2. 


Alice W. Cunningham, 42 Highland Avenue 


700 


1901 


1. 


Martha M. Power, 37 Gleason Street, West Medford . 

JACOB T. GLINES SCHOOL. 
Jaques Street, near Grant Street. 


700 


1890 


9. 


Mary E. Northup, Master, 9 Forster Street 


$1,900 


1878 


9. 


Mary E. Stiles, 9 Forster Street ..... 


775 


1883 


8. 


Mary A. Lawry, 14 Maple Avenue .... 


700 


1905 


8. 


Lilla M. Marble, 72 Rush Street 


700 


1902 


7. 


Louise V. Richardson, 26 Fellsway West 


700 


1907 


6. 


Ellen A. Boynton, 9 Oakland Avenue .. 


700 


1891 


5. 


Margaret A. Orr, 15 Blagden Street, Boston 


700 


1890 


4^ 


Mary A. Goddard, 9 Winter Hill Circle 

Leslie Caverly, 210 Washington Avenue, Chelsea 


700 


1893 


3 4 


650 


1908 


3. 


Florence E. Baxter, 49 Hudson Street .... 


700 


1891 


2. 


Anna G. Welch, 324 Main Street, Stoneham 


700 


1897 


1 2 


Mrs. Carrie Armitage, 57 Madison Street . 


700 


1899 


1. 

ICind'n. 


Isabel J. Tifft, 37 Madison Street 


700 


1892 


Mrs. Etta D. Ellsworth, 112 Newbury Street, Boston . 


600 


1897 


As st. 


Ida M. Kane, 28 Fellsway West . . 


425 


1905 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



231 



TABLE 29.— Teachers in Service January, 1910.— Continued. 



Grade. 


Name and Residence. 


Salary. 


Began 

Service. 




(CHARLES) FORSTER SCHOOL. 








Sycamore Street and Evergreen Avenue. 






9. 


Fred C. Baldwin, Master, 106 Sycamore Street . 


$1,900 


1893 


9. 


Irene S. Nightingale, 14 Court Street, Arlington . 


775 


1895 


9. 


Emma G. Blanchard, 146 Mass. Ave., Boston, Suite 622 


725 


1902 


8. 


Emma M. Damon, 9 Oakland Avenue 


700 


1908 


8. 


Mary M. Badger, 11 Dartmouth Street 


700 


1908 


7. 


Philena A. Parker, 27 Elmore St., Arlington Heights . 


700 


1908 


7. 


M. Edna Merrill, 60 Glenwood Road .... 


600 


1909 


G. 


Mrs. Mina P. Bickford, 216 Park Street, Medford 


700 


1903 


6. 


Elizabeth F. Clement, 29 Kidder Avenue 


700 


1884 


5. 


Mary I. Bradish, 54 Logan Avenue, Medford 


700 


1899 


5. 


Elizabeth S. Brown, 14 Stickney Avenue . 


700 


1897 


4. 
4. 
3. 


Laura R. Cunningham, 42 Highland Avenue . « 


700 


1904 


Mrs. Annie J. Ireland, Winchester .... 


700 


1909 


3. 


Annie S. Gage, 32 Marshall Street .... 


700 


1881 


2. 


Mabel G. Delano, 108 Cross Street .... 


700 


1901 


2. 


Martha L. Hale, 157 Highland Avenue 


700 


1899 


1. 


Grace Shorey, 23 Forster Street 


700 


1892 


1. 


Cora J. Demond, 146 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston . 

(NORMAN W.) BINGHAM SCHOOL. 
Lowell Street, near Vernon Street. 


700 


1900 


9. 


Harry F. Hathaway, Master, 495 Broadway 


$1,900 


1890 


9. 


Elizabeth J. O'Neil, 82 Benton Road .... 


775 


1904 


8. 


Elizabeth J. Mooney, 168 Summer Street . 


700 


1894 


7. 


Jane Batson, 15 Florence Street, Maiden 


700 


1900 


7. 


Naomi E. Stevens, 134 Austin Street, Cambridge . 


700 


1902 


6. 
6. 
5. 


Lucy K. Hatch, 103 Glenwood Road .... 


700 


1892 


Mary F. Mead, 35 Kidder Avenue .... 


700 


1905 


5. 


Harriet F. Ward, 96 Sycamore Street .... 


700 


1895 


4. 


Eva M. Barrows, 720 Broadway ..... 


700 


1903 


4. 


Helen L. Galvin, Braintree . . . 


700 


1903 


3. 


Harriet M. Bell, 34 Bow Street 


700 


1904 


3. 


Bessie J. Baker, Maiden ...... 


700 


1905 


2. 


Grace F. Mulcahy, 350 Broadway 


700 


1903 


2. 


Nellie R. Bray, 3 Oakland Avenue .... 


700 


1897 


1. 


Mabel E. Mansir, 77 Albion Street .... 


700 


1894 


1. 


Clara L. Griffiths, 39 Ames Street .... 


700 


1902 


Asst. 


Frances E. Welch, 303 Highland Avenue 

MARTIN W. CARR SCHOOL. 
Beech Street. 


350 


1908 


9. 


Charles G. Ham, Master, Watertown .... 


$1,900 


1898 


9. 


May E. Berry, 14 Billingham Street .... 


775 


1880 


9 8 


Clara D. Eddy, 35 Laurel Street ..... 


725 


1902 


8. 


Mrs. Mary E. Soule, 124 Summer Street . 


700 


1901 


7' 


Harriet A. Hills, 14 Billingham Street 


700 


1874 


1. 

6. 

6. 

5. 

5. 
5,4. 

4. 
3,4. 

3. 

2. 

1. 

1. 

1. 


Marion P. Crawford, 124 Summer Street 


700 


1897 


Marie T. Smith, 15 Day Street 


700 


1898 


Susie L. Luce, 8 Walter Terrace 


700 


1896 


Mary A. Haley, 117 Summer Street .... 


700 


1867 


Grace T. Merritt, 47 Cherry Street .... 


700 


1897 


Leila L. Rand, 87 Raymond Street, Cambridge . 


700 


1908 


Elizabeth S. Foster, 11 Preston Road .... 


700 


1895 


Lillian M. Wentworth, 248 Highland Avenue 


700 


1909 


Florence B. Howland, 6 Highland Avenue . 


700 


1897 


Florence M. Dearborn, 35 Laurel Street 


700 


1904 


Ethel F. Morang, 157 Lowell Street .... 


700 


1898 


Annie B. Russell, 45 Russell Street .... 


700 


1901 


Pearl F. Dame, 1 Ellsworth Street .... 


525 


1906 



232 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TABLE 29.— Teachers in Service January, 1910.— Continued. 



Grade. 



9. 

9. 
8. 
8. 
7. 
7. 
6. 
5. 
4. 
3. 
2. 
1,2. 
1. 



6. 

Asst. 

5. 
5,4. 

4. 

3. 
2,3. 

2. 

1. 



7. 

Asst. 
6. 
5. 
4. 
4. 
3. 
2. 
1,2. 
1. 



9. 
9. 
8. 
7. 
6. 
5. 
4. 
3. 
2. 
2,1. 
1. 



Name and Residence. 



(ENOCH R.) MORSE SCHOOL. 
Summer and Craigie Streets. 

Mina J. Wendell, Master, 211-A Summer Street 
Alice E. Jdnes, 23 Greene Street .... 

Mrs. M. Florence Eustis, 25 Greene Street . 
Mrs. Clara A. Ball, 12 State Street, Cambridge . 
Mrs. Harriette C. Hamilton, 219 Summer Street . 
Lennie W. Bartlett, 11 Preston Road . 
Blanche E. Thompson, 108 School Street . 
Lizzie E. Hill, Boston ...... 

Alice B. Hazelton, 14 Billingham Street 
Mrs. Agnes C. Rice, 20 Spring Hill Terrace 
Mrs. Cora F. Woodward, 49 Linden Avenue 
Grace S. Russell, 1097 Broadway .... 

Emma M. McKinley, 65 Grove Street . 

GEORGE O. PROCTOR SCHOOL. 

Hudson Street. 



Nora F. Byard, Principal ..... 

Annie Sanburn, 20 Ashburton Place, Boston 

Alice G. Hosmer, 42 Boston Street 

Ella P. McLeod, Corner Forrest and Beacon Streets 

Abbie A. Gurney, 29 Columbus Avenue 

Clara L. Hammond, 62 Chandler Street 

Mary S. Richardson, 13 Bartlett Street 

Edith L. Hunnewell, 23 Milton Street . 

L. Margaret Potter, 59 Belvidere Street, Boston . 

GEORGE W. DURELL SCHOOL. 
Beacon and Kent Streets. 

Abigail P. Hazelton, Principal, 14 Billingham Street, 

Lucie H. Chamberlain, 91 Belmont Street . 

Lena Monroe, 211-A Summer Street . 

Mary Winslow, 23 Hall Street 

MARK F. BURNS SCHOOL. 
Cherry Street, near Highland Avenue. 

Laura J. Brooks, Principal, 31 Stevens St., Stoneham, 

Mrs. Mary C. Buck, 12 Powder House Terrace . 

Cara M. Johnson, 130 Park Ave., Arlington Heights 

Minnie S. Turner, 153 Lowell Street . 

*Bessie I. Sutton, 67 Westland Avenue, Boston . 

Mrs. Margaret D. Hellyar, 20 Lincoln Street 

Annie L. Brown, 281 Summer Street . 

Mary E. Lacy, 63 Cherry Street .... 

Ardelle Abbott, 71 Craigie Street .... 

Alice E. Morang, 157 Lowell Street 

BENJAMIN G. BROWN SCHOOL. 
Willow Avenue and Josephine Avenue. 

George I. Bowden, Master, Hingham . 
Annie G. Smith, 59 Maple Street, Maiden . 
Jennie P. Chapman, 29 Kidder Avenue 
Edith G. Watts, 16 Fosket Street 
Mrs. Phebe E. Mathews, 159 Morrison Avenue 
Grace J. Alexander, 49 College Avenue 
Edna M. Proctor, 93 Revere Street, Boston . 
Lucy M. Curtis, 77 Walnut Street 
Mrs. Grace H. Bliss, 28 Russell Road . 
Rena H. Wiley, 31 Brastow Avenue . 
Ida M. Record, 77 Walnut Street . 



Salary. 



$1,900 
775 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
650 
700 
425 



$900 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 



$775 
700 
700 
500 



$900 
350 
700 
700 
700 
600 
700 
700 
700 
700 



$1,700 
775 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
650 
700 



Began 
Service. 



1882 
1897 
1906 
1906 
1900 
1893 
1906 
1890 
1904 
1900 
1908 
1900 
1907 



1884 
1907 
1900 
1888 
18S8 
1903 
1906 
1894 
1906 



1902 
1907 
1908 

1887 



1883 
1899 
1897 
1885 
1907 
1909 
1885 
1890 
1896 
1893 



1908 
1901 
1905 
1904 
1897 
1900 
1901 
1900 
1900 
1906 
1899 



•Leave of absence. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 
TABLE 29.— Teachers in Service January, 1910.— Continued. 



233 



Grade. 



9. 

9. 
9. 
8. 
8. 
7. 
7. 
6. 
G. 
G. 
5. 
5. 
4. 



9. 

9. 

9. 

8. 

8. 

7. 

7. 

6. 

6. 

5. 

5. 

4. 

4. 

2. 

2. 

1. 
Asst. 
Asst. 



3,2. 
3. 
2. 

1. 

Asst. 
Asst. 



4. 
Asst. 
3. 
3. 
3. 
2. 
2. 
1. 
1. 



Name and Residence. 



HIGHLAND SCHOOL. 

Highland Avenue and Grove Street. 

Aaron B. Palmer, Master, 18 Bay State Avenue 

Grace M. Clark, 10 Vernon Street, West Medford 

Marguerite Burns, 64 Hall Avenue 

Mary L. Bryant, 24 Hall Avenue . 

Mrs. Nellie G. Stewart, 71 Hall Avenue . 

Elsie M. Ross, 201 Morrison Avenue . 

Sarah E. Pray, 126 Orchard Street 

Charlotte M. Canfield, 14 Irving Street 

Lillian E. Richardson, 33 Wallace Street 

Marie Clifford, 23 Wendell Street, Cambridge 

Katie D. Greenleaf, 14 Irving Street . 

Mary H. Joyce, 76 Boston Street . 

Edda C. Locke, 22 Francesca Avenue . 

WILLIAM H. HODGKINS SCHOOL. 
Holland Street. 



Arthur L. Doe, Master, 1077 Broadway 
Edith W. Emerson, 135 Central Street 
N. Irene Ellis, 15 Kidder Avenue . 
Alice S. Hall, 135 Central Street . 
Ethel M. Paige, 143 College Avenue 
Lilla E. Mann, 75 Wallace Street . 
Luanna B. DeCatur, 168 Lowell Street 
Mrs. Gertrude W. Leighton, 85 Central Street 
Beatrice A. Randall, 14 Oxford Street, Cambridge 
Flora A. Burgess, Arlington Heights . 
Catherine A. Burden, 406 Highland Avenue 
Genieve R. Barrows, Waban . 
Katherine M. Fox, Stoneham 
Jennie M. Patterson, 17 Avon Street . 
Hortense F. Small, 9 Newbury Street . 
Dorothy G. Stevens, 168 Lowell Street 
Ellen A. Baker, 12 Windom Street 
Lillian M. Huntington, 44 Preston Road . 

(CHARLES S.) LINCOLN SCHOOL. 

Broadway, near Teele Square. 

Eliza H. Lunt, Principal, 50 Curtis Street . 

Olivia M. Woods, 60 Sacramento Street, Cambridge 

Almena J. Mansir, 77 Albion Street . 

Annie H. Hall, 97 College Avenue 

Mrs. Louise K. Simm, Waverley 

Mrs. Jane A. Smith, 11 William Street 

MARTHA PERRY LOWE SCHOOL. 
Morrison Avenue, near Grove Street. 

May E. Small, Principal, 12 Day Street, Cambridge 
Annie Sanburn, 20 Ashburton Place, Boston 
Alice M. Dorman, 159 Morrison Avenue . 
Maude C. Valentine, 1098 Broadway . 
Stella M. Holland, 46 Chester Street . 
Mrs. Jane M. Taaffe, 159 Morrison Avenue 
Katherine E. Hourahan, 296 Highland Avenue 
Clara G. Hegan, 100 School Street 
Martha A. Jencks, 64 Hall Avenue 

EVENING SCHOOL PRINCIPALS. 

William D. Sprague, High ..... 

Charles T. Murray, Prescott .... 

John S. Emerson, Bell ...... 

Charles E. Brainard, Highland .... 



Salary. 



$1,900 
700 
725 
700 
700 
650 
700 
650 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 



$1,900 
775 
725 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
425 
700 
350 
525 



$775 
500 
700 
700 
425 
425 



$900 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 



$6.00 
3.00 
4.00 
3.00 



Began 
Service. 



1905 
1893 
1907 
1903 
1908 
1908 
1877 
1909 
1904 
1907 
1908 
1891 
1908 



1896 
1896 
1903 
1896 
1909 
1902 
1909 
1895 
1905 
1894 
1902 
1905 
1896 
1903 
1908 
1909 
1908 
1907 



1889 
1908 
1899 
1906 
1909 
1909 



1900 
1907 
1903 
1901 
1903 
1888 
1892 
1897 
1898 



234 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TABLE 29, — Teachers in Service January, 1910. — Concluded. 



Grade. 



7-13. 
■6-1. 



9-1. 



8-5. 
8-5. 
8-5. 
8-5. 



9-1. 



9,8. 
9,8. 



Name and Residence. 



CADET TEACHERS. 

Isabel M. Briinton, 19 Hanson Street . 

Julia M. Delay, 32 Line Street .... 

Susie A. Fitzpatrick, 419 Somerville Avenue 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

MUSIC. 

S. Henry Hadley, 46 Pearl Street .... 
Charlotte D. Lawton, 11 East Newton Street, Boston 

DRAWING. 

Mary L. Patrick, Newtonville .... 



SEWING. 

Mary L. Boyd, 62 Thurston Street 
Emma J. Ellis, 54 Marshall Street 
Bertha P. Paul, 23 Monmouth Street . 

Sara I. Gale, 10 Brastow Avenue 

PENMANSHIP. 

William A. Whitehouse, 26 Cambria Street . 

MANUAL TRAINING. 

Frederick O. Smith, 135 Powder House Boulevard 
Andrew Bjurman, 15 Fairview Terrace, Maplewood 
Willis E. Higgins, 67 Beech Street 

ASSISTANT IN PROCTOR AND LOWE. 

Annie Sanburn, 20 Ashburton Place, Boston 



Mary C. Buck 



ASSISTANT IN BURNS. 



Salary. 



$200 
200 
200 



$1,700 
1,000 



1,000 



700 
700 
700 
550 



1,500 



100 
1,400 
1,400 



700 
350 



Began 
Service. 



1909 
1909 
1909 



1868 
1898 



1895 



1888 
1900 
1900 
1908 



1895 



1909 
1907 
1907 



1906 

1908 



TABLE 30.— OFFICERS, ETC., IN SERVICE JANUARY, 1910. 



Name and Address. 



Charles S. Clark, 82 Munroe Street 

CLERKS. 

Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland Avenue . 
Mildred A. Merrill, 26 Cambria Street . 

TRUANT OFFICERS. 
Justin W. Lovett, 13 Hudson Street 
Jairus Mann, 80 Porter Street . , 




SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



235 



TABLE 31. — SCHOOL JANITORS, JANUARY, 1910. 



School. 



High Schools, S . 
High Schools, assistant 
High Schools, assistant 
High Schools, assistant 
High Schools, fireman 
Prescott, S, 12 
Hanscom, S, 10 
Davis, F, 4 . 
Bennett, S, 12 
Baxter, S,C 
Knapp, S, 12 
Perrv, S, 6 
Pope, S, 12 
Bell, S, 12 
Cummings, F, 4 
Edgerly, S, 12 
Glines, S. 14 
Forster, S, 18 
Forster, assistant 
Bingham, S,16 
Carr, S, 16 
Morse, F, 12 
Proctor, S, 8 
Durell, S, 4 
Burns, S, 8 
Brown, S, 10 
Highland, S, 12 
Hodgkins, S, 14 
Lincoln, S, 4 
Lowe, S, 8 



Name. 



John H. Kelley 
Joseph Young 
William H. Kelley 
Lewis G. Keen 
Edwin Adler 
George A. McGunnigle 
Thomas F. O'Day 
George H. Clapp 
Daniel T. Campbell 
Israel Winterbottom 
William Meskill 
Henry C. Bradford 
Hiram A. Turner 
F. S- Dickinson 
George W. Libby 
Charles P. Horton 
Roy C. Bur ekes 
George W. Coombs 
James L. Whitaker 
John F. O'Brien 
James W. Rich 
John W. Cremen 
George Q. Marshall 
Ellsworth C. Lundgren 
Charles Gallaway 
O. M. Pote 
E. Parker Cook 
John Shea 
Thomas C. Dame 
John F. Richardson 



Residence. 


Salary. 


7 Madison St. 


#25.00 


51 Oxford St. 


19.50 


25 Aldrich St. 


16.00 


56 Prescott St, 


20.00 


22 Robinson St. 


15.00 


50 Pearl St. 


16.00 


134 Lowell St. 


15.00 


35-A Franklin St. 


12.00 


10 Stone Ave. 


17.00 


2 Bolton St. 


12.00 


53 Partridge Ave. 


16.00 


72 Boston St. 


12.00 


16 Gibbens St. 


17.00 


1 Putnam St. 


16.00 


215 Pearl St. 


12.00 


22 Everett Ave. 


16.00 


249 School St. 


18.25 


34 Tufts St. 


18.(0 


146 R Sycamore St. 


16.00 


347 Lowell St. 


21.00 


206 Highland Ave. 


23.00 


69 Oxford St. 


17.00 


19 Wesley St. 


13.50 


50 Harrison St. 


12.00 


160 Hudson St. 


13.50 


23 Howe St. 


15.00 


398 Highland Ave. 


16.00 


97 Gilman St. 


17.00 


1 Ellsworth St. 


12.00 


190 Morrison Ave. 


13.50 



Buildings heated by steam are marked " S," by furnace " F." The numbers show the 
number of rooms. 

The high schools are heated by a single plant in Latin building. 



236 ANNUAL REPORTS. / 



SUPPLEMENTARY TABLES. 

Table A. — Attendance by Grades for Series of years 

Table B. — Proportion Between Number Entering Each Class 

and Its Membership in Subsequent Grades 
Table C. — Decrease of Membership 
Table D. — Diagram i 

Table E— Distribution of Pupils by Ages, October 1, 1909 
Table F.— Distribution of Pupils 14 but not 15, October 1, 1909, 
Table G. — Manual Training Course in Sixth and Seventh 

Grades 
Table H. — Number of books in use December, 1909 
Table I. — Treasurer's Report of Somerville High School Ath- 
letic Association 
Table J. — Amendments to Rules Since Printing of Last Report, 



TABLE A.— ATTENDANCE BY GRADES FOR SERIES OF YEARS. 

Attendance by GradCS BoyS. Heavy line shows membership of a single class. 



Grade 




1901 



108 
780 
689 
632 
592 
557 



5oo_ ™ 



401 
293 
246 
173 
105 
89 
66 



1900 



96 
834 
673 
630 
560 



549 
451 
381 
292 
255 
149 
112 
72 
56 



1899 



130 

844 

647 

. 566 

j 581 
499 
432 

348 
271 
189 
161 

87 
68 
50 



1898 



127 
902 

586 

T>IT 

537 

509 

382 

335 

261 

219 

117 

90 

58 

65 



1897 



112 
811 



ITS 



528 
507 
426 
380 
313 
268 
173 
118 
106 
81 
45 



JT85- 



1896 



68 



572 

484 

460 

428 

367 

349 

217 

172 

131 

94 

60 

49 



1895 



65 

774 

551 

476 

445 

414 

378 

301 

198 

196 

125 

72 

53 

34 



1894 



20 

705 

516 

432 

417 

406 

313 

270 

237 

189 

106 

74 

35 

35 



1893 



726 

464 

406 

410 

377 

317 

294 

270 

204 

110 

49 

30 

29 



1892 



708 

547 

487 

453 

407 

368 

337 

213 

199 

78 

43 

34 

33 



1891 



706 

501 

448 

414 

384 

384 

273 

236 

168 

78 

48 

36 

20 



1890 



667 

453 

400 

413 

339 

325 

268 

200 

158 

75 

50 

27 

35 



1889 



667 

430 

401 

379 

348 

322 

239 

189 

149 

77 

41 

35 

25 



1888 



672 

447 

381 

367 

348 

280 

221 

160 

139 

55 

44 

33 

17 



1887 



660 

396 

341 

395 

314 

299 

240 

168 

123 

56 

42 

22 

23 



Attendance by Grades — Girls, 



Grade 



K 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 



Grade 



1909 



109 

765 
668 
674 
659 
580 
680 
564 
501 
388 
333 
278 
201 
175 



1908 



98 
739 
704 
684 
616 
629 
588 
579 
434 
405 
335 
251 
193 



fTsT 



1907 



101 
760 
674 
666 
640 
614 
604 
500 
412 
441 
315 
238 



W 
1 163 



1906 



105 
744 
702 
642 
645 
610 
526 
493 
472 
434 
306 



f24T 
177 
142 



1905 



101 

740 
700 
669 
636 
562 
562 
483 
495 
378 



J 1ST 
203 
160 
142 



1904 



85 

762 

667 

636 

607 

567 

554 

514 
, 465 . 
■361P 

239 

191 

149 

128 



1903 



111 

776 
662 
597 
557 
557 
563 
504 



314 
198 
173 
156 
128 



1902 



104 
755 
615 
599 
598 
585 
521 
1ST 
376 
282 
210 
166 
149 
134 



1901 



83 
722 
633 
624 
582 
539 
535* 
425 
323 
296 
199 
166 
138 
116 



190(0 



90 
733 
646 
597 
549 

T&2 
469 
375 
349 
266 
200 
156 
127 
117 



1899 



119 
763 

656 
577 



1898 



560 
525 
428 
384 
339 
264 
202 
148 
121 
100 



120 
775 
601 

■33T 

499 
441 

442 
388 
292 
276 
177 
143 
118 
90 



1897 


1896 


1895 


1894 


1893 


1892 


1891 


1890 


1889 


1888 


1887 


113 
733 


98 


70 

672 
492 


23 
636 

468 


634 
457 


600 
451 


554 
434 


548 
369 


534 

328 


497 
351 


484 
334 


'693' 
534 


562 


485 


469 


449 


415 


392 


416 


372 


351 


336 


307 


293 


457 


498 


421 


417 


413 


381 


363 


368 


330 


355 


296 


456 


423 


407 


418 


356 


341 


330 


300 


306 


269 


243 


411 


390 


371 


355 


317 


320 


306 


304 


267 


230 


207 


371 


370 


310 


320 


279 


287 


243 


227 


219 


178 


208 


308 


266 


254 


221 


275 


227 


224 


217 


183 


195 


164 


238 


222 


205 


209 


231 


205 


218 


171 


186 


148 


152 


174 


176 


138 


155 


136 


146 


13(» 


110 


96 


107 


85 


124 


122 


133 


103 


111 


82 


93 


77 


69 


57 


62 


103 


107 


88 


95 


64 


81 


57 


60 


42 


49 


50 


98 


80 


89 


59 


83 


52 


62 


36 


38 


49 


35 



Attendance and Promotions by Grades — Totals. 



K 

Entered 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
Graduated 

10 
11 
12 
13 

Graduated 



1909 



207 

1222 

1595 

1404 

1346 

1307 

1249 

1199 

1122 

950 

759 

719 

637 
472 
360 



264 



1908 



196 

1258 

1572 

1430 

1349 

1307 

1300 

1211 

1138 

865 

771 

742 



597 
452 
318 



sn? 



1907 



194 

1210 

1532 

1384 

1375 

1337 

1239 

1201 

1022 

831 

789 

725 



584 
410 



235 



312 
266 
223 



1906 



204 

1236 

1526 

1473 

1352 

1292 

1240 

1109 

1003 

872 

797 

640 



523 

TTo" 

295 
245 
208 



1905 



195 
1174 
1581 
1456 
1336 
1274 
1189 
1152 
967 
917 
690 

"60T 



489 

344 
281 
233 
211 



1904 



197 
1156 
1586 
1424 
1279 
1267 
1203 
1114 
1003 

851 



630 
512 



1903 



200 
1168 
1651 
1349 
1270 
1182 
1155 
1134 

964 



403 

332 
251 
241 
179 



751 
544 

484 



373 
296 
275 
196 
181 



1902 



197 
1184 
1585 
1266 
1232 
1205 
1183 
1021 



932 
687 
513 
497 



375 
311 
235 
211 
164 



1901 



191 
1092 
1502 
1322 
1256 
1174 
1096 



19CK) 



U 

10! 



1038 
826 
616 
542 
497 



372 

271 
227 
182 
152 



15(17 

131 

12S 

Uf 

TTlT 

9:20 

7<56 
frll 
21 



5: 
4:}4 

49 

68 
99 
73 
31 



Promotions by Grades. 



Grade 



1909 



1458 
1372 
1287 
1270 
1221 
1146 
1060 
810 
750 



1908 



1249 
1169 
1197 
1169 
1104 
1043 
863 
724 



708 



1907 



1187 
1248 
1170 
1112 
1129 
952 
803 



777 
715 



1900 



1279 
1242 
1194 
1126 
1025 
980 

800 
770 
616 



1905 



1260 
1214 
1101 
1104 



1904 



1066 



94 1 ; 

855 
679 
592 



1251 
1148 
1141 
1055 

L\ 999 



956 
738 
627 
508 



1903 



1113 
1079 
1043 1 

1013 
877 
738 
566 
470 



1902 

1138 
1145 

1044 
957 
875 
644 
520 
475 



1901 



1182 
ll3T 
1077 
960 
957 
763 
621 
544 
492 



19( 10 



1899 



249 
1016 
1607 
1303 
1143 

TTlT 
1024 
860 
732 
610 
453 
468 



363 
235 
189 
150 
137 



1898 



247 

1068 
1677 

1187 

TotT 

1036 
950 

824 
723 
553 
495 
382 



294 
233 
176 
155 
130 



1897 


1896 


1895 


225 


166 


135 


1044 


io65 


1094 


1544 


1478 
1106 


1446 
1043 


iiii" 


1013 


953 


925 


964 


958 


866 


882 


851 


821 


791 


757 


749 


684 


719 


611 


576 


483 


452 


411 


394 


401 


368 


370 


374 


292 


307 


263 


230 


216 


205 


184 


167 


141 


143 


129 


123 


121 


119 


92 



1894 



43 

998 
1341 
984 
847 
834 
824 
668 
590 
458 
398 
389 



1893 



261 

177 

130 

94 

111 



1022 
1360 
921 
798 
823 
733 
634 
573 
545 
435 
398 



246 

160 

94 

112 

82 



1892 



959 
1308 
998 
903 
834 
748 
688 
624 
440 
404 
370 



224 
125 
115 

85 
80 



1891 



942 
1260 
938 
820 
777 
714 
690 
516 
460 
386 
296 



208 

141 

93 

82 

68 



1890 



941 
1215 
822 
751 
781 
639 
629 
495 
417 
329 
318 



185 

127 
87 
71 
61 



1889 



882 
1201 
758 
737 
709 
654 
589 
458 
372 
335 
281 



173 
110 

77 
63 
67 



1888 



837 
1150 
781 
671 
722 
617 
510 
399 
355 
287 
243 



162 

101 

82 
66 
57 



1887 



831 
1144 
730 
634 
691 
557 
506 
448 
332 
275 
221 



141 
104 

72 
58 
56 



Number entered 1886-1693 is estimated. 



IK 

11 to 
10t >4 

9£ (4 
?4 
15 
61 16 
55 Jl 
4il8 



1899 



1202 

1046 
966 
918 
766 
702 
584 
477 
461 



1898 



1102 
933 
919 
803 
756 
660 
571 
492 
358 



TABLE B.— PROPORTION BETWEEN THE NUA 1BER ENTERING EACH CLASS AND ITS MEMBERSHIP IN SUBSEQUENT GRADES. 



MEANS. 



Year 
Begun. 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
♦Pro. 
10 
11 
12 
13 
Grad. 



1886 


1887 


1888 


1.339 


1.376 


1.374 


.972 


.941 


.906 


■ .893 


.8S7 


.897 


.944 


.941 


.928 


.851 


.859 


.894 


.920 


.828 


.757 


.831 


.690 


.705 


.726 


.551 


.540 


.531 


.483 


.471 


.498 


.445 


.440 


.350 


.369 


.349 


•288 


.277 


.278 


.245 


.212 


.226 


.206 


.180 


.207 


.182 


.158 


.182 



18S9 



1.362 
.932 
.930 
.946 
.831 
.757 
.661 
.523 
.466 
.433 
.333 
.260 
.226 
.209 
.186 



1890 



1.291 
.996 
.960 
.875 
.876 
.796 
.764 
.612 
.526 
.497 
.386 
.279 
.241 
.224 
.192 



1891 



1.338 
1.059 

.847 
.885 
.871 
.804 
.726 
.587 
.481 
.461 
.370 
.288 
.249 
.208 
.190 



1892 



1.364 
.960 
.883 
.903 
.887 
.825 
.754 
.636 
.543 
.518 
.388 
.324 
.287 
.251 
.220 



1893 



1.331 
.963 
.905 
.938 
.863 
.806 
.716 
.627 
.531 
.485 
.367 
.290 
.246 
.228 
.203 



1894 



1.344 
1.045 
.955 
.966 
.952 
.862 
.758 
.617 
.514 
.485 
.374 
.333 
.282 
.245 
.224 



1895 



1.322 
1.011 

.927 
.947 
.936 
.841 
.755 
.628 
.498 
.468 
.369 
.315 
.270 
.243 
.215 



1896 



1.388 

1.043 

1.008 

1.071 

1.008 

.974 

.875 

.705 

.591 

.569 

.459 

.385 

.293 

.269 

.248 



1897 



1898 



,480 
164 
.095 
.062 
.050 
.978 
.924 
.815 
.661 
.614 
.501 
.393 
.305 
.273 



1.569 

1.219 

1.149 

1.099 

1.107 

1.061 

.939 

.859 

.746 

.679 

.546 

.423 

.337 



1899 



581 
299 
236 
186 
137 
097 
952 
858 
777 
731 
588 
465 



1900 



532 
293 
214 
156 
177 
126 
981 
813 
754 
702 
621 



1901 



1.376 
1.160 
1.163 
1.161 



089 
016 
936 

,792 
,695 



1902 



338 
139 
080 
076 
047 
014 
961 
802 



1903 



1.414 
1.219 
1.144 
1.106 
1.061 
1.037 
.960 



1904 



1.372 
1.260 
1.170 
1.157 
1.125 
1.037 



1905 



347 
255 
171 
113 
065 



1906 



235 
120 
091 
057 



1907 



1.266 
1.053 
1.112 



1908 



1.279 
1.116 



1909 



305 



Grade 1 
" 2 
" 3 
" 4 
" 5 
" 6 
" 7 
" 8 
" 9 

Pro. 
" 10 
" 11 
" 12 
" 13 

Grad. 



1886 to 
1895 



1.344 
.978 
.908 
.927 
.884 
.820 
.736 
.605 
.504 
.473 
.366 
.294 
.248 
.220 
.195 



1896 to 
1909 



1.391 

1.180 

1.136 

1.159 

1.087 

1.038 

.942 

.807 

.704 

.659 

.543 

.416 

.312 

.271 

.248 



1886 to 
1909 



.372 
.092 
.033 
.024 
.984 
.917 
.822 
.682 
.579 
.535 
.425 
.329 
.201 
.237 
.200 



* Graduated from Ninth Grade. 



PROPORTION BETWEEN GIRLS AND BOY s IN ATTENDANCE. 



11 years, 1894-1904, the entering class was 85.4 per cent, of mean of grades 1-5 inclusive. 
(Girls equal 100.) Figures are per cent. Boys. MEANS. 



Year 
Attend'g 



Kinder- 
garten. 



137 

110 

133 

132 

134 

118 

110 

84 

93 

92 

56 

57 

36 



1887 



136 

119 

116 

133 

1*9 

144 

115 

102 

81 

66 

68 

44 

66 



1888 



135 

127 

124 

103 

129 

122 

124 

82 

94 

51 

77 

67 

35 



1889 



125 

131 

119 

115 

114 

121 

109 

103 

80 

80 

59 

83 

66 



1890 



122 

122 

114 

112 

113 

107 

118 

92 

90 

68 

65 

45 

97 



1891 



127 

116 

120 

114 

116 

126 

112 

105 

77 

60 

52 

63 

32 



1892 



1893 



1894 



118 


114 


121 


102 


117 


104 


119 


99 


119 


106 


115 


100 


117 


105 


94 


98 


97 


88 


53 


81 


52 


44 


42 


47 


63 


35 



87 

111 

110 

104 

100 

97 

88 

84 

108 

90 

68 

72 

37 

59 



1895 



93 
115 
112 
1(16 
100 
102 
102 

?} 

78 

96 - 

91 

54 

60 

38 



1896 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 




18SG to 
1897 


1898 to 
1909 






























Kinder- 






70 


99 


106 


109 


107 


133 


89 


80 


132 


93 


94 


92 


100 


92 


garten. 


8 


102 


113 


111 


116 


111 


114 


108 


110 


113 


108 


114 


105 


102 


113 


108 


1 


12 


110 


107 


98 


98 


97 


104 


109 


106 


104 


114 


108 


110 


105 


103 


110 


2 


11 


106 


103 


109 


104 


98 


105 


101 


106 


113 


101 


100 


111 


106 


97 


100 


3 


114 


104 


92 


111 


108 


104 


102 


102 


102 


112 


109 


100 


100 


109 


112 


98 


4 


111 


105 


101 


93 


115 


95 


98 


103 


102 


107 


110 


112 


103 


102 


107 


115 


5 


113 


106 


94 


92 


86 


101 


96 


94 


96 


99 


101 


105 


111 


99 


106 


107 


6 


111 


100 


94 


84 


86 


91 


102 


94 


90 


91 


95 


100 


103 


104 


96 


99 


7 


106 


96 


82 


87 


89 


80 


84 


91 


83 


82 


83 


85 


85 


102 


99 


90 


8 


93 


88 


77 


73 


79 


72 


96 


83 


82 


73 


71 


83 


84 


79 


90 


96 


9 


86 


82 


74 


68 


66 


80 


74 


87 


79 


88 


69 


73 


71 


85 


78 


91 


10 


71 


78 


76 


85 


63 


59 


72 


63 


87 


71 


74 


69 


69 


72 


80 


70 


11 


63 


71 


56 


79 


49 


56 


57 


64 


58 


76 


68 


76 


67 


59 


65 


79 


12 


57 


65 


61 


46 


72 


50 


47 


57 


57 


53 


79 


64 


73 


63 


55 


61 


13 


53 


61 



1886 to 
1909 



98 
116 
110 
109 
108 
110 
106 
101 
90 
84 
74 
67 
61 
57 



SCfiOOL DEPAKTMENT. 23 1 



TABLE C — DECREASE OF MEMBERSHIP. 

Proportion between number entering each year and the member- 
ship of the same class in succeeding grades: — 

MEANS ONLY. 

1886 to 1896 to 1886 to 

1895. 1909. 1909. 

Grade 1 1.344 1.391 1.372 

2 978 1.180 1.092 

3 908 1.136 1.033 

4 927 1.159 1.024 

5 884 1.087 .984 

6 820 1.038 .917 

7 736 .942 .822 

8 605 .807 .682 

9 504 .704 .579 

" 10 366 .543 .425 

" 11 294 .416 .329 

" 12 248 .312 .261 

" 13 220 .271 .237 

Grammar Graduates 473 .659 .535 

High Graduates .195 .248 .200 



RATIO OF THE SEXES. 

Comparison of girls and boys in attendance in several grades. 
These figures give the per cent, which the boys bear to the girls: — 

MEANS. 

1886 to 1898 to 1886 to 

1897. 1909. 1909. 

Kindergarten 87% 102% 98% 

Grade 1 122 110 116 

'' 2 115 106 110 

3 114 104 109 

4 Ill 105 108 

5 113 106 110 

6 HI loo 106 

7 106 96 101 

8 93 88 90 

9 86 82 84 

10 71 78 74 

, 11 63 71 67 

12 57 65 61 

13 53 61 57 



23S 



ANXTJAL REPORTS. 






TABLE D.-DIAQRAn 



Xormol' 



/ 4, 3 v r (> 7 $ & ? to II tZ, /3 G- 

Diagram showing ratio between membership and number entering. 
The normal line represents the number entering. The diagram is the 
mean result of rears 1886-1909. 






SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



239 



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240 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TABLE F. — Distribution of Pupils, 14 but Not 15, October 1, 1909. 





NUMBER OF GRADE 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


Total 


English 

Prescott 

Hanscom .... 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

Bell... 

Cummings. . . 

Edgerly 

Grimes 

Bingham 






i 

1 

.001 


i 

l 
*i 

3 

.003 


2 

2 

i 
i 

2 

i 
i 

2 


5 
1 

*3 

2 
2 

i 
"s 

14 
1 
1 

•• 

i 


7 

ii 

13 
6 

*6 
7 
1 
9 
13 
12 

2 

6 
6 

8 


'9 
24 

i'± 

14 

22 
12 
15 
8 
16 
27 

8 

12 
17 


13 

22 

12 

19 

23 

7 
23 
18 
13 
17 

ii> 

33 

20 


7 
14 


9 
4 


20 
40 

60 
.068 




1 

2 


100 

186 

34 

3 

3 

60 

1 
42 
43 

51 
28 
39 
40 
57 


Morse 

Proctor 

Durell 

Bums 

Brown 

Highland .... 
Hodgkins. . . . 

Lincoln. 

Lowe 


59 
1 

2 
2d 
51 

49 


Total bv grades 
P. C by 






12 
.014 


36 
.041 


107 
.122 


19S 
.226 


232 
.265 


22 
.25 


3 
5 


3 
.003 


875 
.998 



TABLE G.— A COURSE IN MANUAL TRAINING 

FOR SIXTH AND SEVENTH GRADES AND ITS Ain. 

A definite course of graded models is herein outlined to be followed 
generally. The purpose of this course is to supply additional hand 
work, to train the pupil in the use of tools, to develop power of obser- 
vation, habit of orderly procedure and precision, and the ability to do 
the thing undertaken. While these are general aims, a particular aim 
is to arouse and develop the creative power of the child. To this end 
he may be encouraged to make other models suggested by this course, 
while he is held to the careful doing of whatever herein is undertaken. 

TOOLS. 

The tools to be used may be classified in two groups: (a) for the 
teacher, (b) for the pupil. 

Group A. Group B. 

Pencil. Block plane. Pencil. 

Rule. Hammer. Rule. 

Try square. Bench hook. Try square. • ' 

Knife. Oil stone. Knife. 

Back saw. Oil can. Hammer (3 to each set). 

The knife to be furnished by the pupil and to be in the nature of a 
strong jackknife. 

For use in connection with these sets a suitable number of pencil 
compasses will be placed in each building. 

Each building will have one permanent set (a), while set (b) will be 
transferred as called for by schedule. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 241 



STOCK SHEET. 

(Seventh Grade.) 
The material for the present year will be given partly prepared, as 
the opportunity for getting out such stock in the schoolroom is very 
limited. 

Kind and Size. 

Model. Stock. Size. 

1. Plant stick 1-2 in. white pine 12in.x3-4in. 

2. Penholder 1-2 in. " " 7 in. x 5-8 in. 

3. Crumb knife 1-4 in. gum wood 12 in. x 1 7-8 in. 

4. Peggy 7-8 in. whitewood 4 in. x 1 in. 

5. Peggy bat 3-8 in. " 16 in. x 1 3-4 in. 

6. Windmill 1-2 in. gum wood 13 in. x 3-4 in. 

1-2 in. " " 10 in. x 5-8 in. 

7. Crumb tray 1-3 in. " " 8 1-2 in. x 5 1-4 in. 

" 1-8 in. " " 7 1-2 in. x 2 in. 

" 1-4 in. " " 18 in. x 1 1-2 in. 

8. Bracket 3-16 in. basswood board form 

9. Envelope rack 5-16 in. white pine 9 11-16 in. x 3 5-16 in. 

" 5-16in. " " 12 1-2 in. x 2 1-2 in. 

" 5-16in. " " 9 3-4 in. x 5 1-4 in. 

STOCK SHEET. 

(Sixth Grade.) 
The material for the present year will be given partly prepared, as 
the opportunity for getting out such stock in the schoolroom is very 
limited. 

Model. Stock. Size. ; 

1. Ruler 3-16 in. basswood 12 in. x 1 1-4 in. 

2. Key tag 3-16. in. " 3 1-2 in. x 1 3-8 in. 

3. Seed label 3-8 in. white pine 5 1-16 in. x 1 1-2 in. 

4. Key rack 3-8 in. whitewood 7 in. x 2 in. 

5. Calendar board 1-4 in. gum wood 3 1-4 in. x 3 in. 

6. Yarn winder 1-8 in. cherry 4 in. x 2 1-2 in. 

7. Door button 7-8 in. white pine 3 1-2 in. x 1 3-4 in. 

8. Paper knife 1-2 in. " " 7 1-2 in. x 5-8 in. 

9. Stamp box 5-8 in. " " 2 1-2 in. x 1 1-8 in. 

" l-8in. " " 6in.x3-4in. 

" 1-8 in. " " 2 1-2 in. x 1 3-8 in. 



242 



ANNUAL REPOKTS. 



TABLE H.— .Number of Books in Use in the City, December, 1909 



School. 


u 

6 

JS 

< 


t* 
P» 

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o 

V 

O 


to 
JO 

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4) o 


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09 

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O 

H 


Prescott . . 
Hanscom . 
Davis. . . 
Bennett . . 
Baxter . . 
Knapp . . 
Perry . . , 
Pope . . . 
Bell . . • 
Cummings . 
Edgerly . . 
Glines . . 
Forster . 
Bingham 
Carr . . . 
Morse . . 
Proctor . . 
Durell . . 
Burns . . • 
Brown . . 
Highland . 
Hodgkins . 
Lincoln . . 
Lowe . . . 


515 
228 
101 
375 
209 
985 
142 
587 
476 
225 
830 
448 
1,177 
663 
699 
913 
269 
170 
505 
401 
890 
652 
2 
51 


475 
180 
105 
173 
124 
603 
193 
408 
400 

73 
328 
475 
643 
392 
638 
526 
158 

110 
263 
519 
548 

29 
109 


358 
107 
51 
66 
111 
435 
101 
390 
383 

2 
402 
368 
550 
401 
506 
403 
169 

4 
146 
256 
602 
477 

2 

7 


308 

50 



17 

25 

588 

48 

395 

291 



379 

281 

556 

242 

416 

504 

85 



143 

161 

396 

391 






468 
204 

50 
182 
103 
611 
150 
447 
452 

46 
563 
409 
679 
505 
572 
483 
279 

46 
209 
305 
650 
540 
1 

51 


776 
502 
200 
521 
253 
917 
361 
724 
607 
190 
866 
807 

1.189 
873 
915 

1,043 
462 
207 
537 
575 
872 
880 
174 
362 


642 
348 
156 
272 
269 
638 
292 
541 
497 
150 
683 
633 
853 
712 
831 
822 
458 
160 
362 
481 
637 
695 
193 
289 


95 

30 

31 

57 

28 

181 

32 

163 

149 

31 

217 

85 

128 

125 

109 

203 

25 

29 

36 

125 

75 

153 

4 

28 


2,941 
1,574 

891 
1,862 
1,516 
2,564 
1,168 
2,460 
1,386 

982 
3,513 
1,713 
4,957 
1,825 
3,484 
3,312 
2,188 

923 
2,113 
1,812 
2,276 
3,046 
1,501 
1,379 


593 
498 
117 
186 
28 

1,433 
189 
875 
161 
214 
433 
551 
548 
843 
263 

1,070 
157 
312 
729 
201 

1,425 
243 
261 
332 


42 

13 

8 

7 

11 

61 

18 

33 

23 

6 

14 

19 

50 

50 

38 

31 

8 

7 

19 

23 

34 

36 



2 


7,213 
3,734 
1,710 
3, 70S 
2,677 
9,016 
2,694 
7,023 
4,825 
1,919 
8,228 
5,789 
11,330 
6,631 
8,471 
9,310 
4,258 
1,848 
4,909 
4,603 
8,376 
7,661 
2.167 
2,610 


Total . • 


11,513 


7,472 


6,287 


5,276 


8,005 


14,813 


11,604 


2,139 

■ | 


51,386 


11,662 


553 


130,710 




J3 
w 

He 

c 
W 


a 

£ 


c 
<« 

S 

01 

O 


.5 

h-3 


c 

cd . 

o > 
.HCJ 

w 


0) 

O 


t/5 

s 

<u 

ei 


ai 

u 

a 

G 
w 


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u 

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G 

u 


c 

3 

u 

o 

s 


tn 

3 
C 

u 

c 

CS 

"3 

O 
DO 

s 




Latin . . 
English . . 


1,982 
3,725 


966 
2,969 


1,151 
1,091 


1,968 
1,176 


765 
2,500 


500 


756 
1,368 


202 

882 


1,112 


1,073 


422 
1,149 


8,712 
17,043 


Total .. 


5,707 


3,935 


2,242 


3,144 


3,265 


500 


2,122 


1,084 


1,112 


1,073 


1,571 


25,755 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 243 



TABLE I. — Somerville High School Athletic Association. 
Treasurer's Report. 

JULY 1, 1908, to JUNE 30, 1909. 

Harry L. Jones, Treasurer. 

Receipts. Expenses. 

Balance $110.18 Football $1,793.19 

Football 2,598.04 Hockey 47.64 

Baseball 390.99 Basket ball 167.01 

Basket ball 53.30 Baseball 1,017.45 

Treasurer 100.00 

$3,152.51 



$3,125.29 

Balance June 30, 1909 27.22 

Treasurer's Report. 

1909. 

Receipts. Expenses. 

Balance $27.22 Football:— 

Football 4,801.23 Supplies $806.17 

Membership, 1908-1909.... 85.50 Manager's expenses.... 16.89 

Coaching 375.00 

$4,913.95 Field 178.64 

Labor at field.. 135.73 

(Secret practice and 
games, etc.) 

Telephone 34.23 

Printing 83.42 

Traveling expenses 45.85 

Advertising 10.10 

Medical attendance and 

supplies 88.64 

League dues 10.00 

Express 4.20 

Postage 30.82 

Miscellaneous expenses, 5.00 

Treasurer's expenses... 84.95 

$1,909.64 
Balance December 31, 1909 $3,004.31 



2U 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



nONEY EXPENDED AT BROADWAY FIELD BY THE SO/IERVILLE HIGH 
SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION FOR STANDS, LABOR, flATERIAL, ETC. 



Labor 




1904. 


$1,000.00 
17.52 
30.00 
15.50 
15.90 
13.15 
9.00 


Labor 




1905. 


$452.53 
30.00 


Insurance , 


Insurance 

Numbering 
Signs .... 






30.00 


Numbering 


us expenses.. 




15.00 
19.85 
13.80 


Miscellaneo 


Miscellaneous 


expenses. , 


11.00 



$1,101.07 



$572.18 



1906. 



1907. 



'Stands $421.95 



Labor 

Insurance 

Numbering stands, 

Settees 

Signs , 



79.50 

30.00 

14.10 

5.00 

9.50 



^Maintenance of field $143.80 

Labor 30.00 

Insurance 30.00 

Numbering stands 18.78 

Signs 6.85 



1908. 
of field. 



^Maintenance 

Labor 

Numbering stands , 

Signs 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



$560.05 

$132.00 

79.25 

20.20 

1.30 

2.50 

$235.25 



$229.43 



1909. 

^Maintenance of field.... 

*Labor, Everett and R. M. 
T. S 

Extra labor, secret prac- 
tice for games, etc.. .. 

Numbering seats 

Signs 

Settees 

Miscellaneous expenses. . 



$171.40 

180.20 

135.73 

21.60 

7.70 

6.00 

8.00 

$530.63 



1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 



$1,101.07 
572.18 
560.05 
229.43 
235.25 
530.63 



FOOTBALL STATISTICS, 

Attendance 

Gross receipts 



$3,228.61 

SEASON OF 1909, 12 GAilES. 



Police 

Field 

Officials , 

Printing 

Supplies 

Miscellaneous expenses. 
Visiting teams, receipts 
Somerville's receipts... 



and expenses 



Total 



24,497 
$11,346.10 

$443.00 

. 245.00 

410.00 

151.50 

128.75 

364.27 

4,802.35 

4,801.23 

$11,346.10 



*Paid Citv of Somerville. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 215 



TABLE J.— Amendments to the Rules of the School Committee. 

HADE SINCE THE PRINTING OF THE LAST ANNUAL REPORT. 

Section 130 of the Rules was amended to read as fol- 
lows : — 

Kindergartens may be established and maintained by the 
Board whenever it is deemed wise. 

Adopted May 2k, 1909. 

Section 58 was amended by substituting" the sum of $1,350 
for the sum of $1,300 as the maximum salary of the truant 
officer, he to furnish and maintain his own team. 

Adopted November 29, 1909. 

The following was substituted for Section 116 : — 

There shall be twenty-five minutes of recess in the high 
schools at such time as the head master shall choose. 

In elementary schools there shall be a recess of ten min- 
utes midway of the morning session. 

In the first three grades of the elementary schools there 
shall be a recess of seven minutes midway of the afternoon 
session. This recess may be allowed in other grades of ele- 
mentary schools by the principal. 

Pupils shall not be required to take an open-air recess in 
inclement weather. 

No pupil shall be deprived of any portion of the regular 
recess of his class. 

Adopted November 29, 1909. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS 

OF THE SOMERVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY, YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1909. 

Trustees. 

Edward C. Booth, M. D. Thomas M. Durell, M. D. 

John B. Viall. William L. Barber. 

J. Frank Wellington. Rev. Charles L. Noyes, D. D. 

Frederick W. Parker. Frederick W. Hamilton, D. D. 

William H. Burgess. 

Officers. 

Edward C. Booth, M. D. ...... President 

Sam Walter Foss ....... Secretary 

Committees. 

Building and Grounds — Viall, Wellington, and Noyes. 
Administration — Wellington, Parker, and Durell. 

Books and Catalogues — Booth, Viall, Noyes, Durell, Barber, and Hamilton. 
Finance — Parker, Barber, and Burgess. 

Librarian. 

Sam Walter Foss. 

Assistant Librarian. 

Florence D. Hurter. 

Cataloguer. 

Esther M. Mayhew. 

Assistant Cataloguer. 

Edith B. Hayes. 

Children's Librarian. 

Anna L. Stone. 

School Librarian. 

Mary S. Woodman. 

Reference and Art Librarian. 

Mabel E. Bunker. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



247 



Bessie L. Duddy. 
Alice W. Sears. 
Florence M. Barber. 



Assistants. 



A. Myrtle Merrill. 
Ruby G. White. 
Louise Thiery. 



Cecil M. Barlow. 
William E. Bagster. 



Attendants. 



Edgar L. Kaula. 
Harry Benson. 



Janitor. 

Charles A. Southwick. 



WEST SOMERVILLE BRANCH. 

Branch Librarian. 

Nellie M. Whipple. 

Assistants. 

Ethel M. Nute. 

Bessie S. Cobb. 

Annie M. Currie. 

Attendant. 

Ronald Moore. 

Janitor. 

John J. Kilty. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY ACCOUNT. 



Receipts and Expenditures for 1909. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation $16,000 00 

Dog tax ... 3,796 11 

West Somerville Branch 19 92 

Somerville Y. M. C. A 2 21 

Fines, etc 768 50 

Total $20,586 74 

DEBIT. 

Books and periodicals $6,809 35 

Binding 1,631 84 

Cards 105 00 

Printing 608 40 

Stationery 70 42 

Salaries 9,959 24 

Agencies 587 55 

Express 315 34 

Postage 39 00 

Telephone 42 71 

Supplies . 107 35 

Binders 78 40 

A. L. A. membership 5 00 

Repairs 27 95 

Insurance 67 50 

Disbursements 35 00 

Sundries 60 48 

Stereographs 16 86 

Ice 19 35 

Total $20,586 74 



West Somerville Branch. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation 

Fines, etc. 

Total 

DEBIT. 

Books and periodicals . . . 

Binding 

Cards 

Printing 

Stationery . . . ' 

Salaries 

Express 

Telephone 

Supplies 

Binders 

Ice 

Frame 

Total 



$2,500 00 


133 27 


$2,633 27 


$1,354 62 


214 91 


19 43 


16 90 


24 54 


855 52 


35 30 


14 23 


37 32 


53 50 


5 00 


2 00 


$2,633 27 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 249 

Isaac Pitman Art Fund. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 

Interest July 31, American Telephone & Telegraph Co. . 
Interest December 31, American Telphone & Telegraph 

Co. . . . 

Interest accruing on deposits December 31 ... 



Total 



DEBIT. 



$115 62 
80 00 


80 00 
20 40 


$296 02 


$168 75 
127 27 


$296 02 



Books and pictures purchased in 1909 
Balance carried to 1910 . 

Total 



Isaac Pitman Poetry Fund. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 

Interest July 31, American Telephone & Telegraph Co. . 
Interest December 31, American Telephone & Telegraph 

Co 

Interest accruing on deposits December 31 ... 

Total 

DEBIT. 

Books purchased in 1909 

Balance carried to 1910 

Total 



Frances A. Wilder Fund, 

CREDIT. 

Interest accruing on deposit of $100 $4 40 



$44 29 
20 00 


20 00 
5 10 


$89 39 


$55 13 
34 26 


$89 39 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen, — The thirty-seventh annual report of the trus- 
tees of the public library is herewith respectfully submitted. 

The report of the librarian is grouped with this more gen- 
eral and cursory report, and to the former your honorable body 
is referred for a detailed and statistical statement of the opera- 
tion of the library for the year. 

The affairs of the library are in a healthy condition, and the 
institution is enjoying in an enviable degree the confidence and 
good will of the people of Somerville. 

The year has been a uniformly prosperous one, and has 
been unusually marked by the completion and opening of the 
West Somerville branch library building, which was mentioned 
as being in course of erection at the time of our last report. 

Although three flourishing agencies at the northwesterly 
part of the city have been discontinued in consequence of the 
establishment of the branch, the new institution has enabled the 
library to offer its opportunities more effectively to the people 
at large, and to those of West Somerville, in particular, as is 
shown by the considerable increase in the circulation. 

The circulation of the three agencies, — the West Somer- 
ville, the Teele-square, and the Highland, — was 23,477 books 
for the six months of 1908 corresponding to the six months of 
1909, in which the new branch circulated 54,534. The natural 
increase in business which these three agencies would have 
shown, had they been continued and the branch not built, is 
partly offset by a deduction which should be made in the figures 
of the Highland agency, which drew probably from one-quarter 
to one-half of its borrowers from territory that the branch 
draws little or nothing from. Therefore it is safe to say that 
the circulation of books in the West Somerville district is con- 
siderably more than doubled by the establishment of the new 
library. 

The cataloguing department has been crowded with busi- 
ness during the year, as it has done the same character of work 
in preparing for circulation the books of the branch as it has 
done for the main library. 

The children's department at the main library has naturally 
been somewhat less attended since the establishment of the 
branch, but with the children's work done at the latter institu- 
tion, the results have exceeded those of any year since the es- 
tablishment of the department. 



PUBLIC LIBKAKY. 251 

The bills for binding have been increasing so alarmingly in 
the last few years, with the increase in circulation, that it is 
with satisfaction that we can report a substantial reduction in 
this item. This reduction has been brought about by the set- 
ting up of a simple and inexpensive binding plant within the 
library building, which has been efficiently operated by one of 
our assistants, Miss Sears. The origin and work of the new 
feature are fully described in the librarian's report. By this 
arrangement we have been able at moderate cost to utilize 
many books previously used for circulating-library purposes, 
and thus come nearer supplying the great demand of our 
readers for recent fiction. For the modern, up-to-date metro- 
politan library, from the nature of its patrons and the character 
of its business, which is confined almost exclusively to fiction, 
is particularly sensitive to the waning popularity of the season's 
novels, and proceeds early to unload its surplus copies, whereas 
the vogue of the new novel is much longer at a public library. 

The branch library was opened to the public on May 27, in 
charge of a branch librarian, Miss Nellie M. Whipple, and two 
assistants, on a schedule of fifty-two hours per week, — the 
hours being from one to nine o'clock P. M. on five secular days 
of the week, and from nine o'clock A. M. to nine o'clock P. M. 
on Saturday. From the beginning the new branch has been 
patronized beyond the expectations of the most sanguine. The 
circulation on a more than 100,000 basis is larger than that of 
the parent library when Mr. Hayes became librarian in 1893. 

It is a matter of congratulation to the trustees that a re- 
cent inventory taken of the 6,000 and odd books at the branch 
disclosed the loss of only six, and this while the public has had 
at all times free access to the shelves. 

An investigation into the geographical distribution of the 
patrons of the new branch and the characteristics of the terri- 
tory tributary to it may prove of interest. In regard to the 
location of the city's libraries, it may be remarked that the cen- 
tral library is situated on a main avenue between the city hall 
and the two high school buildings, nearly in the geographical 
centre of the city, which at this point is upwards of a mile and 
three-quarters in width. The West Somerville branch building 
is situated a mile and a half northwesterly from the main library 
on the line of the city's long axis, near the business centre of 
West Somerville, somewhat beyond a point where the city nar- 
rows to a width of less than three-quarters of a mile and con- 
tinues for seven-eighths of a mile at substantially the same 
width. This district is succeeded by a strip of land near the 
debouching of Alewife brook into the Mystic river, now to a 
considerable extent under improvement as a part of the park 
system of Greater Boston, — a little more than half a mile long 
and a little less than a quarter of a mile wide, soon to be partly 
available for residential purposes, but as yet hardly built upon. 



252 ANNUAL EEPOETS. 

The entire region tributary to the branch is a comparatively 
new one, and is occupied by a fairly homogeneous community 
of enterprising people. It was not without good library privi- 
lege before the establishment of the branch, as there were then 
three agencies in the district, — the West Somerville agency 
near the new branch ; the Teele-square agency near the half- 
mile circle on the northwesterly side ; and the Highland agency, 
also on the half-mile circle to the southeast, in the general 
direction of the main library. A circle drawn around the 
branch as a centre, with a radius of a quarter of a mile, comes 
close to the Cambridge line. The half-mile circle cuts into 
Medford on the northeast, embracing eight acres of that city's 
territory, and on the southwest extends into Cambridge some 
600 feet westerly of Massachusetts avenue, and returns to Som- 
erville nearly a mile from where it entered, encircling ninety- 
seven acres of that city's lands. The area of a circle of a 
quarter-mile radius is 125 acres. The greater part of this is 
thickly settled, probably as much so as it will be for a long 
time to come. The population is upwards of 4,075 on a basis 
of four persons to a household. The patrons of the branch 
within this area number approximately 1,480, 864 being new 
card holders, who had never used the main library, and 615 who 
had been borrowers at the main library, but wished to avail 
themselves of the privileges of the branch when it was opened. 
The area contained between the quarter and the half-mile circle 
is 377 acres, 271 of which are within Somerville territory. The 
population of this area by a similar estimation to the above is 
8,700. It contains a park of four and a half acres and about 
fifty-nine acres of Tufts College grounds. Some twenty-five 
acres of this last tract is now being opened for settlement, about 
one-half of it being already built upon. Otherwise this larger 
circular area is nearly as thickly settled as the smaller. The 
number of borrowers living within it is approximately 1,815, of 
whom 991 are new card holders and 824 who have likewise 
been card holders at the main library. Beyond the half-mile 
circle, towards the main library, the number of borrowers at 
the branch shades off rapidly. Eight hundred and forty-nine 
patronize the branch who live nearer to the branch than to the 
main library, but the larger number of these come from the 
north end of the city. 

After passing a point midway between the two libraries 
towards the main library, but 210 have taken out cards at the 
branch. There are no noticeable barren spaces within a half- 
mile of the branch where there are no library patrons, and 
every one of the 100 streets within this limit has its borrowers. 
One observation that can be drawn from these researches is 
that the patrons of a public library decrease in number in pro- 
portion to the distance that they are called upon to travel for 
library privileges, — a very natural conclusion, confirming previ- 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 253 

ous experience, and showing that, were it not for the cost, 
branches could advantageously be established in other parts of 
the city. Undoubtedly the publicity connected with the estab- 
lishment of the branch brought to many for the first time a 
knowledge of where our libraries are located, but it is feared 
that many people in the city are still uninformed of the location 
or even of the existence of such institutions in the community. 

Before dismissing this subject, we would say that we be- 
lieve that it would be profitable to extend these investigations 
to the remaining parts of the city, as time permits, until finally 
the relationship or non-relationship to the library of every 
household in the city is recorded. 

In regard to the appropriations to be asked of your honor- 
able body for the coming year, we believe that the requirements 
of the main library will be $18,000 and the usual dog tax, and 
of the branch $5,000. This is slightly more than has been 
granted hitherto, but an insufficient number of books have been 
purchased for the main library for several years past, and in 
each department there is a call for a little greater expenditure, 
as its work enlarges with the growth of the city. The branch 
has been carried on for the first seven months of its existence 
at the rate of $1,285 per annum. Salaries will be somewhat 
increased, as was adverted to last year, and an extra attendant 
needed at the present time will soon become necessary, on ac- 
count of the unexpectedly large business which has developed 
since the inauguration of the branch. 

We are again glad to bear witness to the faithfulness and 
efficiency of our librarian, Mr. Foss, and the staff in both libra- 
ries, and we also wish to record our appreciation of the services 
of the branch librarian, Miss Whipple, who for the last year has 
enthusiastically devoted herself, regardless of hours, to the 
opening and management of the new institution. 

Respectfully submitted for the board of trustees, 

Edward C. Booth. 

President. 
December 28, 1909. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 



To the Trustees of the Somerville Public Library : — 

I herewith submit the librarian's thirty-seventh annual re- 
port. Following my usual custom, I append a somewhat de- 
tailed statement of the work done by each department : — 

The Cataloguing Department. 

The cataloguing department, Miss Esther M. Mayhew, 
cataloguer, has had an unusually busy year. In addition to the 
regular work ordinarily done, much extra labor was involved in 
cataloguing nearly 7,000 books for the branch library. These 
books were acquired by the branch library by transference from 
the central library and by direct purchase. In either case, con- 
siderable work was necessitated for the cataloguing depart- 
ment. The shelf list for the branch library was prepared by 
Miss Duddy. There are probably more than 15,000 cards in 
the main catalogue at the central library. All the cataloguing 
work of the branch will continue to be done at the central 
library. 

Below are given the general statistics of this department : — 

Books Added. 

Accession number January 1, 1909 99,197 

" 1910 108,105 

Total number added during 1909: — 

Main library 7,502 

Branch " 1,406 

Total 8,908 

Books new to library 4,023 

Duplicates . # 4,885 

Total number withdrawn 17,682 

Total number in library: — 
Main library ........ 83,543 

Branch " • , 6,880 

Total 90,423 

Books Withdrawn. 

Books worn out 798 

" lost in schools QQ 

" " by general readers 257 

" " in agencies 184 

" burned per order Board of Health 60 

Total number of books withdrawn 1,365 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 255 

Total number of books withdrawn to January 1, 1909 . . 16,317 

during 1909 .... 1,365 



a u 



Total 17, 

7,469 catalogue cards have been purchased from the Li- 
brary of Congress during 1909. 



Binding. 



Volumes re-bound . 
Periodicals 
Paper-covered books 
Repaired . 



Main. 


Branch. 


Total. 


2,751 


360 


3,U1 


243 




243 


253 


35 


288 


40 


1 


41 



3,287 396 3,683 



The Children's Department. 

The children's department, Miss Anna L. Stone, librarian, 
has during the year had a circulation of 60,839 fiction and 
14,841 other works, making a total of 75,680. It may be in- 
teresting to know that of the "other works" circulated Gen- 
eral Works were 1,628 ; Philosophy, 25 ; Religion, 376 ; Soci- 
ology, 2,543 ; Philology, 200 ; Natural Science, 984 ; Useful 
Arts, 508 ; Fine Arts, 1,167 ; Literature, 2,092 ; Travel, History, 
and Biography, 5,318. 

The children's department of the public library does a work 
for the community whose value it is difficult to over-estimate. 
The work is not performed under the most favorable condi- 
tions. The room is damp, and perhaps sometimes unwhole- 
some in the summer season, and is poorly heated in the winter. 
There is, under present conditions, no adequate way of venti- 
lating it. The children themselves are uncomplaining patrons, 
but criticism on the part of adults is not infrequent. The often- 
repeated recommendation that an entrance to the children's 
room be made directly from the outside, if carried into effect, 
would do much to abate the noise in the general reading room 
caused by the passage of large numbers of children up and 
down the stairs. 

The School Department. 

The school department, Mary S. Woodman, librarian, is an 
agency that brings the public library into direct contact with 
the public school. Libraries usually consisting of about forty 
books are now sent to 165 schoolrooms of the city. This prac- 
tically means 165 distributing agencies for the circulation of 
public library books, and enables the library to reach hundreds 
of families that would not otherwise be reached. 



256 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Below are the statistics of this department for the year: — 

Books in library 8,274 

Increase during year 773 

Libraries out 165 

Libraries delivered 171 

Volumes out 6,819 

Volumes delivered . . 7,698 

Circulation during year: — 

Fiction 51,240 

Non-fiction . . . . . . . . . 67,224 

Total 118,464 

Reference and Art Department. 

The reference and art department, under the supervision 
of Miss Mabel E. Bunker, has accomplished its usual amount 
of work during the year. 

Below is given the monthly attendance for the year : — 

January 1,018 

February 986 

March 896 

April 718 

May . 679 

June ' 610 

July 410 

August 343 

September 567 

October 771 

November 1,065 

December v 668 

Total 8,731 

Number of registered visitors to the Art Room . . . 215 

Americana Room . 105 



a a 



Total 320 

This does not give the complete number of persons who 
use the books in the Art and Americana rooms, as many books 
are brought to the main reference room to be consulted there. 

Number of volumes in Reference and Art Department . 9,993 
Number of volumes withdrawn for the West Somerville 

branch 26 

Increase of volumes during the year 314 

During the year there have been seventeen art exhibitions, 
as follows : — 

Norway, No. 1, Bergen, Hardanger Fjord, and Lognfjord. 

Walter Crane, No. 1, Pictures for Children, Art for the Nursery. 

Rise of Sculpture, No. 1. 

Rise of Sculpture, No. 2. 

Fourteen Famous Pictures. 

Greece, No. 3. » 



PUBLIC LIBKARY. , 257 

City of Rouen. 

Views of New England Scenery. 
Famous Pictures, No. 3. 
Amesbury, Mass. 
Audubon Bird Plates. 
Millet (drawings reproduced). 
Granada and the Alhambra. 

Photograph of Boston Parks and Metropolitan Parks of Massa- 
chusetts (our collection). 
The Song of Hiawatha. 

Etchings of William Unger, No. 2, of Dutch and Flemish Schools. 
Boydell's Illustrations of Shakespeare, Part 1. 

Some of the books purchased during the year for this de- 
partment: — • 

Buckley, Hoppin & Churchill, ed., (The) Fine Arts, 2v. 

Bunce and Owen, Nature's Aid to Design. 

Cutter, W. R., comp., Historic Homes and Places and Genealogical 
Memoirs Relating to the Families of Middlesex County, Mass., 4v. 

Cyclopedia of Automobile Engineering, 4v. 

Cyclopedia of Building Trades, 6v. 

Cyclopedia of Civil Engineering, 8v. 

Cyclopedia of Heating, Plumbing, and Sanitation, 4v. 

East, Alfred, Landscape Painting. 

Hind, C. L., Augustus Saint-Gaudens. 

Klassiker der Kunst-Memling. 

Knowlton and Ridgway, Birds of the World. 

McSpadden, J. Walker, Famous Painters of America. 

Meister der Farbe, 1908. 

(The) Old Masters, 100 Examples in Color, 2v. 

Rhead, G. Woolliscroft, Studies in Plant Form. 

Schriever and Cummings, ed., Complete Self-Instructing Library of 
Practical Photography, 8v. 

Standard Library of Natural History, 5v. 

Stearns, Whitcher, and Parker, ed., Genealogical and Family His- 
tory of the State of New Hampshire, 4v. 

Williams, H. S., History of the Art of Writing, 4v. 

The need of more room in the reference department be- 
comes increasingly apparent each year. Whether it is possible 
to secure this room by any alteration in the building, by the 
removal of partitions, or by increased height of shelving, is a 
matter to be determined after consultation with a building 
expert. 

Binding. 

During the past year more than usual attention has been 
given to the subject of binding. It has been felt for a long 
time that a more expert knowledge of the details of binding — 
the knowledge of leathers, sewing, joints, tapes, etc. — should 
be possessed by some member of the library staff in order to 
deal with the matter intelligently. Librarians have learned by 
many exasperating experiences that a book may be outwardly 
beautiful, but yet be very flimsily bound, and fall to pieces after 
a few readings. Expert knowledge is necessary in a library in 



258 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

order to detect this flimsy work. Accordingly Miss Alice W. 
Sears, of the staff, volunteered to make a study of this subject. 
She spent a week in one bindery, learning the principal details 
of the work. She has spent several days, also, at two other 
binderies, has visited the bindery of the Boston public library, 
and has tried in every way to thoroughly inform herself in re- 
gard to the work. As a result of her experience, she has es- 
tablished a bindery department in the library. A press, a sew- 
ing frame, cloth, thread end-papers, and other paraphernalia of 
a bindery have been purchased, and she has set about the actual 
work of repairing books. Since April, when she first began 
the work, she has repaired 3,3G6 books. The reduction in 
binding bills for the year, largely in consequence of her work, 
in the library has really been astonishing. 

In 1908 our entire binding bills amounted to $3,680.53. In 
1909 our entire bills amounted to $1,832.13, a saving of 
$1,848.40, or about fifty per cent. This is a remarkable evi- 
dence of the utility of her work. 

Miss Sears has also instructed Miss Cobb, of the branch 
library, in the details of the work, and repairing of similar na- 
ture is now carried on at the branch. 

Agencies. 

Since the closing of the three agencies at West Somerville 
the library has been in a condition to supply the demands of 
the remaining agencies. The South Somerville agency does 
not circulate any books from a shelf supply. But for Union 
square and East Somerville, where shelf supplies are kept, many 
more of the new books than ever before have been purchased. 
Miss Florence M. Barber, who has charge of the agencies, 
visits them regularly, reports their needs, and recommends the 
purchase of books. The work at the agencies, as far as can be 
learned, has given better satisfaction the present year than ever 
before. 

In the natural course of evolution, a prosperous agency 
ought in time to develop into a reading room, and the reading 
room eventually develop into a branch. There is already a 
considerable public demand for reading rooms both at Union 
square and at East Somerville. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



259 



Below is a table of circulation of the different agencies dur- 
ing the year: — 



Agencies. 


V 

v 3 

i) a 1 

H CO 


"> 
u 

^ co 


'> 

u 

*-■ ** 
in £ 

W co 


V 

'> 
(-1 •"' 

3 6 
O O 

CO CO 


o rt 
£ CO 


T3 
C 


January . 
Shelves . 






252 
1,080 


230 
1,595 


7 
738 


192 


6 

436 


3 
963 


February 
Shelves 






250 
1,100 


272 
1,579 


9 

876 


189 


5 

473 


2 
1,099 


March 
Shelves . 






280 
1,417 


402 
1,949 


26 
1,000 


228 


10 
579 


6 

578 


April 
Shelves . 






198 
1,078 


278 


q 

820 


146 


6 

485 


Closed 
Mar. 9, '09 


May 
Shelves . 






201 
974 


255 


4 

809 


162 


7 
417 




June 
Shelves . 






149 
601 


70 


2 
959 


216 


13 
374 




July 

Shelves 






Closed 

June 19, '09 


26 


2 
679 


183 


16 
433 




August . 
Shelves . 








56 


7 
818 


206 


13 

455 




September 
Shelves . 








47 


6 

774 


127 


2 
381 




October . 
Shelves . 








52 


3 

808 


161 


5 
409 




November 
Shelves . 








87 


2 
1,099 


201 


10 
506 




December 
Shelves . 








38 


8 
796 


145 


6 

388 




Totals .... 


7,580 


6,936 


10,255 


2,156 


5,495 


2,651 



Grand Total 



35,073 



General Work. 

The general work of the library, under the supervision of 
Miss Florence D. Hurter, shows a slight decrease, due to the 
opening of the branch library in West Somerville. 

The general circulation figures of the year are as follows ; — 



260 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



January- 
February 
March . 
April 
May ■ . 
June 
July . 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 

Total 



Fiction. 


Other Works. 


Total. 


27,438 


13,033 


40,471 


28,388 


13,554 


41,942 


36,260 


16,956 


53,216 


25,597 


12,831 


38,428 


24,006 


12,513 


36,519 


23,926 


9,808 


33,734 


15,914 


3,286 


19,200 


17,675 


3,746 


21,421 


14,165 


4,382 


18,547 


19,269 


9,551 


28,820 


27,093 


14,922 


42,015 


21,528 


11,624 


33,152 



281,259 



126,206 



407,465 



Below is given our shelf circulation figures (books deliv- 
ered from library shelves) : — 

Fiction. Other Works. Total. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July . 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



16,057 


5,677 


21,734 


16,050 


5,790 


21,840 


21,333 


7,640 


28,973 


15,913 


5,257 


21,170 


14,613 


4,773 


19,386 


15,615 


4,512 


20,127 


13,718 


3,056 


16,774 


14,576 


3,440 


18,016 


10,940 


3,187 


14,127 


12,099 


4,171 


16,270 


17,083 


5,822 


22,905 


13,172 


3,977 


17,149 



Total 



181,169 



57,302 



238,471 



Below 
fiction : — 



is given our circulation by classes, exclusive of 



General works 
Philosophy 
Religion 
Sociology 
Philology 
Natural science 
Useful arts . 
Fine arts 
Literature . 
History 



Total of general delivery . 
Delivered from children's room 



Total of other works 

Fiction 
Other works 

Total . 

Percentage, fiction . 
Percentage, other works 



7,992 
1,499 
8,584 

20,248 
1,633 

13,682 
5,426 
7,837 

15,688 

28,776 

111,365 
14,841 

126,206 

281,259 
126,206 

407,465 

69.03% 
30.97% 



PUBLIC LIBRAKY. 



261 



Below is the statistical statement of the general work of 
the year : — 









108,105 




Main. 


Branch. 


Total. 


Volumes in library 


83,543 


6,880 


90,423 


added 


7,502 


1,406 


8,908 


discarded .... 


1,350 


15 


1,365 


Total circulation 


. 407,465 


62,381 


469,846 


Shelf " . . m . 


. 238,471 


62,381 


300,852 


Children's room circulation 


75,680 


19,539 


95,219 


Cards issued 


7,016 


2,532 


9,548 


Delivered from Teele Square agency . 




*1,330 




shelves . 




6,250 




" West Somerville agency 




tl,813 




shelves 




5,123 




" East Somerville agency 




79 




shelves 




10,176. 




" South Somerville agency 




145 




" Union Square agency . 




6 




shelves 




388 




" Highland agency . 




§11 




shelves 




2,640 




" Knapp school 




1,522 




Volumes delivered to school libraries . 




7,698 




Volumes delivered to Sunday schools, 


clubs, hos- 






pitals, etc. 




1,209 




Visitors in reference room 




8,731 




Received, fines 


'. $868 29 






books 


93 86 






telephone .... 


7 24 






Total 


. $969 39 




By sundry expenses 


. $200 89 






" cash to City Treasurer 


. 768 50 








$969 39 





*CIosed June 19, 1909. 
tBooks taken April, 1909. 
§Closed March 9, 1909. 



Below is given the circulation figures of main library and 
West Somerville branch : — 



Fiction: — 

Main library . 

West Somerville branch 

Total . 

Other works: — 
Main library . 
West Somerville branch 

Total .... 

Fiction .... 

Other works 



281,259 

50,808 

332,067 

126,206 
11,573 

137,779 

332,067 
137,779 



Total 



469,846 



262 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Percentage, fiction • . 70.68% 

Percentage, other works 29.32% 

Circulation of three agencies in 1908, during the months in 
which they were closed in 1909 : — 

Highland agency, March-December .... 9,354 

Teele Square agency, June-December .... 8,879 

West Somerville agency, April-June .... 6,136 



Total 24,369 

This amount, added to our total circulation for the year, 
407,465, makes a total of 431,834. Last year our total circula- 
tion was 448,224. So the net loss of circulation in the general 
library, due to the opening of the branch, is 16,390. 

During the year 472 vacation cards were issued, on which 
2,796 books were taken out, 2,434 being fiction and 362 other 
works. Thirty-seven sets of stereographs are now owned by 
the library. The circulation of these sets during the year 
amounted to 1,462. 

The following Sunday schools take books from the library : 
Bow-street Methodist, Flint-street Methodist, Highland Con- 
gregational, Prospect-hill Congregational, Second Advent, Sec- 
ond Unitarian, West Somerville Baptist, Winter-hill Congrega- 
tional, and the Winter-hill Universalist. 

Books are also sent to the Somerville Boys' Club, Somer- 
ville Y. M. C. A., Somerville hospital, Home for the Aged, and 
the police station. There were 1,209 books sent to the various 
Sunday schools, clubs, etc., of which 1,042 were fiction and 167 
other works. 

The 1915 Exhibit. 

The Somerville library, together with the Boston library, 
the Cambridge library, the Atheneum, "and the State library, 
installed an exhibit at the Boston 1915 exposition. This ex- 
hibit, like most of the exhibits at that exposition, consisted 
largely of photographs. The Somerville photographs were ar- 
ranged to show the progressive growth of the library, and con- 
sisted of interior and exterior views. The West Somerville 
Carnegie branch library was represented by a group of photo- 
graphs showing all the rooms of the building and several ex- 
terior views. 



PUBLIC LIBKARY. 



263 



The library has received the following donations of books, 
pamphlets, and periodicals during- the past year : — 

List of Donations. 





Vols. 


Pamph. 


Periods. 


Adams, Charles F. 


1 K 






Allen, George W. .... 








1 




American School of Metaphysics 






1 






American Sports Publishing Co. 






i 






Amherst College .... 






i 






Benton, Josiah H. 








2 




Booth, Edward C, M. D. . 








1 


25 


Boston Transit Commission 






2 






British and Foreign Unitarian Association 






1 






Cambridge Bridge Commission . 






1 






Carrick, Samuel P. . 






2 






Casson, Herbert N. . 






1 






Charities Publishing Com. . 








1 




Choates, Joseph H. . 






1 






Civil Service Commission . 






1 






Collins Memorial Committee 






1 






Cutler, S. Newton .... 






4 






Dana, John Cotton .... 








1 




Dartmouth College .... 






1 






Densmore, Emmet, M. D. . 






2 






Dexter, Mrs. E. Alline Osgood . 


(M 


usic) 


1G7 






Emerson, Francis P., M. D. • . 








1 




Emerson, Gilbert D. . 








1 




Farnsworth, Edward C. . . . 






2 






Fifth Maine Regiment 






1 






Free Religious Association 








1 




Foss, Sam Walter .... 






4 






Fryer, Thomas T. 






1 






Green, S. W. 








1 




Green, Samuel S. . . . . 








1 




Greene, John M., D. D. 






2 






Harvard University .... 






1 






Haseltine, M. W. 








1 




Hunnewell, James F . 






1 






Jeffers, LeRoy ..... 






1 






Kaan, Frances W. . 






1 






Lake Mohonk Conference . 






1 






Lee, Thomas Z. . 






1 






Library Bureau ..... 






1 






Loring, George F. 










Massachusetts ..... 






37 


2 




Massahusetts Historical Society 








1 




Massahusetts Institute Technology 






2 






Merchants Association of New York . 








2 




Metropolitan Water Board 






1 






Middlebury, Vermont, College . 








1 




Middlesex County .... 






1 






Miller, Leslie W. .... 






1 






Moody, J. H 








1 




Moon, James H. .... 






1 






Municipal Ownership Publishing Bureau 






1 






National Civic Federation . 








1 




Carried forward ..... 


257 


20 


25 



264 



ANNUAL EEFOETS. 



LIST OF DONATIONS. -Concluded. 





Vols. 


1'amph. 


Periods. 


Brought forward ..... 


25"? 


20 


25 


N. E. An ti- Vivisection Society . 










1 




Xew Zealand .... 








2 






Ohio State University 








1 






Ohio Wesleyan University 








1 






Pearson. R. A. . 








1 






Perkins Institution for the Blind 










3 




Publicity Commission, North Adams 








1 






Public Libraries 










95 




Rawson, Frederick W. 








1 






Raymond, George Lansing- 















Rowland, Dunbar 








2 






Sanborn. Mrs. Carrie A. 








1 






Smithsonian Institution 








4 


4 




Sornerville, Mass. 








2 






Stickney. Rufus 
Stimson. John W. 
Sturgis. R. C. 
Towle Manufacturing Co. . 








21 

1 
1 
1 


o 




Tufts College . 








1 






Tufts. Martha B. 










47 




Underbill. Charles L. 








96 


4.-i 




Union Steamship Co. 










1 




Union University, Albany 
United States .... 








1 

14 






U. S. Brewers' Association 








2 






Valentine. H. E. 








1 


1 


36 


Varilla, P— B 








1 






Webster. Miss E. S. . 








2C 


49 


g 


Whitaker, George E. . 








1 






Woods. Hon. John M. 








10 






Totals 


459 


20S 


70 



West Sornerville Carnegie Branch Library. 

On the evening of May 26 the West Sornerville Carnegie 
branch library was dedicated, with appropriate ceremonies. 

Addresses were given by his Honor Mayor John M. 
Woods and John F. Foster, through whose efforts the gift of 
$25,000. which made the building possible, was secured from 
Andrew Carnegie. 

A short address by Walter T. Littlefield, commissioner of 
public building?, was made, in which he tendered the keys of the 
building to the library trustees. Owing to the unavoidable ab- 
sence of the president, the keys were accepted by William L. 
Barber, of the board of trustees, with an appropriate speech of 



PUBLIC LIBKAEY. 



265 



acceptance. Dr. Horace G. Wadlin, the librarian of the Boston 
public library, gave the formal address of the evening, an effort 
of unusual fitness and power. All the addresses given on this 
occasion will be found in full in an appendix to this report. 

From the beginning the West Somerville branch has been 
a success. An unexpected amount of business has been done, 
a business that, considering the number of books contained in 
the library, has been really phenomenal. Miss Nellie M. 
Whipple, a member of the general library staff, was appointed 
librarian of the branch library, and the success of the institu- 
tion has been due in no small degree to her organizing ability, 
her tact and courtesy, and the hard and persistent effort she has 
put into the work. 

Below is given in detail the statistics of the work accom- 
plished : — 



June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



Fiction. 


Other Works. 


Total. 


7,897 


2,017 


9,914 


6,973 


1,395 


8,368 


7,469 


1,457 


8,926 


6,495 


1,315 


7,810 


6,938 


1,655 


8,593 


8,738 


2,185 


10,923 


6,298 


1,549 


7,847 



50,808 



11,573 



62,381 



Below is given circulation by classes, exclusive of fiction 

General works 2,586 

Philosophy 276 

Religion ' 198 

Sociology 369 

Philology 10 

Natural science 327 

Useful arts 453 

Fine arts 816 

Literature 1 ? 067 

History 1^443 

Total of general delivery 7,545 

Delivered from children's room 4,028 

Total of other works 11,573 

Fiction 50,808 

Other works 11,573 

Total 62,381 

Percentage, fiction 81.44% 

Percentage, other works 18.56% 



266 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The branch library has received the following donations of 
books during the past- year : — 

Vols. 

Bailey, Robert M 9 

Brewster, C. A 5 

Bryant, Mrs. G. W. . 23 

Clough, G. M. . 14 

Dickson, John L. 6 

Hunnewell, Miss Alice 1 

Little, Brown & Co. . 2 

Morse, L. T 6 

Somerville, Mass. 1 

Wyorke, G. H 1 

Total 68 



Conclusion. 

The year 1909, on the whole, has been a successful and 
prosperous one with the library. The increase in circulation 
has not been as large as it would have been if two of the West 
Somerville agencies had not been closed early in the year, in 
anticipation of the opening of the branch library. With the 
opening of this branch, a large permanent increase in the 
amount of business done may be confidently expected. 

I wish to express my thanks to the staff and to all the 
members of your board for hearty help and co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sam Waltek Foss, 

Librarian. 
December 28, 1909. 






DEDICATORY EXERCISES 

AT THE 
CARNEGIE WEST SOMERVILLE BRANCH LIBRARY 

May 26, 1909. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

The most interesting and important event of the year has 
been the establishment of a branch library at West Somerville. 
An increase of library accommodations at West Somerville had 
been considered and urged by the trustees for many years, but 
the city government felt that the financial condition of the city 
would not warrant any considerable expenditure for the pur- 
pose. In the report of 1906 the trustees recommended that a 
reading room be fitted up with books and magazines and placed 
in charge of an assistant, and this temporary expedient would 
undoubtedly have been adopted, had not the problem been 
solved in an unexpected way. The citizens of West Somerville 
had long wished to have a special building erected for this pur- 
pose, but the subject was first publicly discussed at a meeting 
of the West Somerville board of trade on September 10, 1906, 
when a committee, consisting of Howard D. Moore and Winsor 
L. Snow, was appointed to arrange for a public meeting in the 
following month in furtherance of this object. This public 
meeting was held on October 25. It was largely attended, 
much interest and enthusiasm were manifested, and the pre- 
vailing opinion was for a building to be erected on the Lincoln 
schoolhouse lot. It was voted "that it is the unanimous sense 
of the community that we should have a branch library prop- 
erly housed in West Somerville," and a committee of three citi- 
zens was appointed to co-operate with the committee of the 
board of trade and "continue the efforts to secure favorable 
action by the city government towards locating a branch library 
in West Somerville." 

On the evening of the meeting of the board of trade on 
September 10, previously mentioned, there was some informal 
talk as to the advisability of asking Andrew Carnegie to give a 
library building. This idea did not meet with the approval of 
the majority, but John F. Foster was led to believe that a happy 
solution of the problem lay in securing the aid of Mr. Carnegie, 
and quietly, and on his own responsibility, began to work along 
these lines. He had a talk with R. A. Franks, a financial agent 
of Mr. Carnegie. This he followed up with a letter to Mr. 
Franks on March 14, 1907, in which he refers to a sentiment 
prevailing in West Somerville in favor of asking Mr. Carnegie 



268 ANNUAL EEPOETS. 

to make a gift to the city of Somerville of a branch library 
building, in consequence of the apparent improbability of se- 
curing an appropriation for the purpose from the city, and asks 
that the usual application papers for such a request be sent to 
him. After an exhaustive inquiry into the existing library 
facilities of the city and the supposed needs of the West Somer- 
ville district, Mr. Bertram, private, secretary of Mr. Carnegie, 
writes on April 9 that, "if the city agrees by resolution of coun- 
cil to maintain a branch library at a cost of not less than $2,500 
a year, being additional to the gross amount now spent on the 
central library, and procures a suitable site for the branch 
building, Mr. Carnegie will be glad to give $25,000 for the erec- 
tion of a branch library building for the city of Somerville." 
The offer was submitted to the city council at their meeting of 
April 25, and was referred by them to the finance committee. 
At the suggestion of the mayor, the city solicitor was requested 
to draw a suitable resolution meeting the requirements of Mr. 
Carnegie, and not taking from the trustees of the library the 
control of their department. Further questions having arisen, 
it was ascertained that it was Mr. Carnegie's intention that per- 
manent fixtures, such as shelving, stacks, and delivery desk, 
should be purchased from the gift. No restrictions were im- 
posed by Mr. Carnegie regarding the choice of architect or the 
style of the structure. 

After a conference with the trustees, a public hearing, 
thorough discussion, long deliberation, and a reiteration of the 
sentiment of the community of West Somerville, as expressed 
at a public meeting held on June 12, the offer of Mr. Carnegie 
was formally accepted by the city council, and its action ap- 
proved by the mayor on October 29. In this order of accept- 
ance the mayor was authorized to promise, in behalf of the city 
government, the annual appropriation required by the terms of 
the gift. Mayor Grimmons, having satisfied Mr. Franks that 
a fitting site had been selected, that the land was free of liens, 
and that the city was ready to begin building, called to his 
aid an advisory committee, consisting of E. S. Sparrow, L. E. 
Merry, Rev. J. V. Garton, J. F. Foster, and James Davis, 
prominent citizens of West Somerville, and W. T. Littlefield, 
commissioner of public works, and Dr. E. C. Booth, presi- 
dent of the board of trustees of the public library, and pro- 
ceeded immediately to the task in hand. At the first meeting 
of the mayor and the advisory board on January 14. 1908, 
it was decided to invite an open competition of architects 
for a design for the building. The second meeting, on March 
17, was held for the purpose of inspecting the thirty-five plans 
submitted. On March 19 the mayor formally invited the trus- 
tees of the library and the librarian to express their opinions on 
the plans, through their president. At the third meeting, on 
April 28. the members of the committee handed in their choice 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 269 

of the best five plans in the order of their preference. At the 
fourth meeting, on October 8, it was decided to place the words 
"Public Library" on the lintel over the front door. The mayor 
selected the plan drawn by McLean & Wright, architects of 
Boston, which was generally admitted to embrace the best 
features exteriorly and interiorly, and at the same time could 
be carried out within the amount of the gift. The building 
contract was awarded to Charles H. Belledue, and ground was 
first broken on July 9. The building having been completed 
and the furniture installed, in accordance with the wishes of the 
trustees, the library building was dedicated with appropriate 
exercises on May 26, 1909, and formally turned over to the con- 
trol of the trustees of the public library. The building was 
placed in the centre of the spacious lot on College avenue, for- 
merly occupied by the Lincoln schoolhouse, and faces south- 
easterly. From the front stairway hall of this beautiful and 
commodious building stairs rise on the one side to a spacious 
auditorium, with stage and ante-rooms, and descend on the 
other to a well-lighted basement. From the vestibule we enter 
the library proper — a hall, with reading room on one side for 
adults, on the other for children, occupying the front part of 
the wings. In this hall space the delivery desk is so placed as 
to command the two side rooms and the radiating stacks in the 
rear. The total width of the building is seventy-one feet, and 
the depth sixty-seven feet. 

Photographs of the interior and exterior of the building 
will be found elsewhere in this report, and an account of the 
dedicatory exercises is herewith appended : — 



ADDRESS OF WALTER T. LITTLEF1ELD, COMMISSIONER OF 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

"Mr. Mayor, Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen: About one 
year ago the first step was taken towards the erection of the 
beautiful building in the dedication of which you are taking part 
this evening. It has been my duty to exercise a general super- 
vision over the construction work, and I desire to state pub- 
licly at this time my appreciation of the advice and counsel 
which has been given me by the members of the advisory com- 
mittee and all others connected with its erection. I also wish 
to state that my official relations with the architects, contrac- 
tors, and all concerned have been most pleasant, and that this 
building has been completed without friction or controversy. I 
hold in my hands, Mr. Mayor, the keys to this building, and as 
commissioner of public buildings of this city I now pass them 
to you as the city's chief executive." 



270 ANNUAL EEPOittfS. 

ADDRESS OF HIS HONOR, HAYOR JOHN M. WOODS. 

"In dedicating this library, I believe the thought and pur- 
pose that was in the mind and heart of the generous donor, 
Andrew Carnegie, and as well of Mr. Foster and all who have 
assisted or contributed towards the erection and completion of 
this building, was that this should be the home and dwelling 
place of intellectual culture in its highest and best sense. 

"Intellectual culture is an essential element in the life of a 
people. This building we now dedicate is to be the abiding 
place, the home of this idea, the temple where these ideas are 
to be enthroned, and the people are to revere them. In these 
services we wish to obtain true conceptions of the nature of 
intellectual culture. We hope to be convicted of our privilege, 
duty, and responsibility, and at the same time have some glori- 
ous conceptions of life, and also to kindle aspirations that will 
always burn. 

''This building is to have a vital connection with the life 
of this people. In it these ideas are to have local habitation 
and a prominence they have hitherto not possessed. 

"I wish to speak of intellectual life. And first, what is in- 
tellectual life? It is thoughtful life; the individual thinks, and 
what is it to think? This is not an idle, listless frame of mind. 
It is not to seize the myths of the hour and accept them as 
truth. It is not to take floating rumors and mischievous gossip 
as fact, whether coming from mercenary publishers or the shal- 
low brains of those who love, feed, and live on sensation. 
Thought is nothing of this ; but it is in the individual putting 
himself to the severest task, the hardest, toughest kind of 
work, and holding himself to it, with no let-up till the work is 
done. The body, the physical being is wondrous. Its func- 
tions to the one who thinks are an enchanting, rapturous study. 
But the mind, the intellect, is infinitely more so. The very 
process of coming to know is wonderfully amazing. How, by 
the holding of the attention steadily to a subject, the subject will 
become clear to the individual's perceptions. He has learned 
it. He knows it, and his very being is thrilled with the con- 
sciousness of an acquisition, and, more than this, he feels the 
pulsation of a larger, a higher life. He addresses himself to 
another subject with a larger hope, a firmer purpose, and more 
assured anticipations of the luxury he is to experience. For 
to have once tasted the luxury of real thought is to have found 
something that nothing could buy and upon which the indi- 
vidual will set no price. To really think is to enter the unseen, 
the glorious, the infinite world of truth. It is to feel the con- 
sciousness of personal power. It is to come to know some- 
thing of what a world one's own personality is, and the won- 
drous things faithful thinking can find. 

"This structure is one that all must contemplate with pride, 



PUBLIC LIBRARY; 27l 

and which must impress the passing stranger with a deep con- 
viction that here is an intelligent and public-spirited people. It 
stands a symbol of simple elegance and chaste beauty. The 
power of such a building over a population cannot be estimated 
too highly in calling out and maturing the simple, gentle, lovely 
graces of character ; and when it is remembered that it stands 
for the intellectual spirit, its power is increased a thousand fold. 
It is not a place for entertainment and pleasure, further than 
high thinking is entertainment, and lofty ideas, noble purposes, 
and earnest seekings for the best in thought and life are a 
pleasure. 

"In setting this building apart as a public library, an insti- 
tution is opened that proffers great privileges to the present 
and coming generations. There is a responsibility for the im- 
provement of these privileges. This is an educational institu- 
tion. Here the people are to learn to read, and this means 
very much. Here they are to learn to think, which means 
much more. Here they are to seek truth, and learn to be true. 
Here they are to gather up the experience of past ages and 
from that become wiser than any preceding generation. Here 
they are to find the best companionship in the thought of the 
best and loveliest spirits, embalmed in the literature of the past 
and the present ; and they should take these companions with 
them into all their living. 

"The intellectual life takes everything on to a higher 
plane. It ennobles everything, whether it be of a public or 
private nature. This spirit quickens the life of the neighbor- 
hood. It tidies up the surroundings of each habitation, takes 
care that streets and public ways are in good condition, that 
vitiating influences are suppressed, and that there shall be 
everywhere a deepening sense of self-respect. The more thor- 
ough the intellectual spirit of a community, the more truth- 
loving will be that community. An ardent passion for the 
exact sciences, for the truth in history, for the truth in morals 
will lead to exactness in life and a strict subjection to the laws 
of God. Let the pure, intellectual spirit control the life, com- 
pletely possess it, and that life will be truthful. He who is 
studying for the exact truth will not yield himself to the do- 
minion of error. The people completely possessed of the in- 
tellectual spirit will be truthful. 

"The intellectual spirit is peaceful ; it has no delight in the 
blare of trumpets, the clangor of martial hosts, and the gory 
plains of battle. To truly enthrone the intellectual spirit is to 
introduce an era of peace in the fullest sense. 

"This spirit exalts the home ; it loves its sacred seclusion, 
it brings its best and lays it on the altar of home, it imparts 
and it receives. Home is not true to its ideals without this 
spirit. This is its crown. This spirit purifies and ennobles life. 
To be truly intellectual is to be above the sensual and sordid. 



272 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

It does not love to loiter at rich banquets, to make the markets 
a constant study, to have continually in mind the rise and fall 
of stocks. It is not supremely devoted to material ends, but 
to the acquisition of wisdom, understanding. 

''The intellectual spirit is light-producing; darkness flees 
before it. It is light in one's own being, light in human so- 
ciety. As an age is possessed of this spirit, it is an age of light ; 
as the intellectual leads in the onward movement of society, it 
is a powerful headlight making distant pathways plain. 

'The spirit is hopeful and alluring. Hopeful, for the more 
it is exercised, the more of power is felt; the more of wealth 
it reveals. It ever allures to something higher and better, and 
that yields more satisfaction. It is ever giving the thoughtful, 
earnest mind glimpses of the great world of fact and visions of 
the glories of the great temple of truth. The higher it rises, 
the more overpowering are its visions of glory. This spirit 
draws to itself the noblest and the best. It should be noticed 
that, to understand the thought of others, we must first possess 
the intellectual spirit. We must first have felt the throb of that 
life in our own and enter into and know that life. To know 
and enjoy a book we must enter into the labors of the author; 
we cannot fully understand it until we have toiled in it and upon 
it after the manner that he toiled. This becomes enchanting 
labor when for once the individual realizes his duty and privi- 
lege and gives himself to it. This is not a labor in a dark mine, 
with small compensation, with uncongenial fellows, but it is 
toiling where the light is ever brightening and delightful views 
ever opening, and where there is none of the usual accompani- 
ments of the dirt and the dust of toil, none of the sense of per- 
sonal defilement by engaging in it, or of the degradation of ser- 
vile labor, but it is through imperative duty, glorious privilege. 

"I love to forecast the future and contemplate what of real 
life and true blessing this building and the library will be. I 
love to think of this day as an era. I love to think of the li- 
brary shelves as gradually being filled with good books, history, 
biography, travels, literature, both poetry and prose, encyclo- 
pedias, popular treatises on science, fiction of the best kind, 
and everything that will enrich and ennoble human life." 

ADDRESS OF MR. JOHN F. FOSTER. 

Mayor Woods next called upon former Representative 
John F. Foster, through whose efforts the gift of the branch 
library building was received from Andrew Carnegie. 

Mr. Foster delivered an informal address, in which he re- 
counted the efforts, through a long series of years, of many 
prominent West Somerville citizens to obtain a reading room in 
their section of the city. The agitation for greater library ac- 
commodations has been carried on for a long time without any 
apparent results. It is a matter of great congratulation that 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 273 

the hopes of the citizens of West Somerville, in the erection of 
this building, are now more than realized. Mr. Foster also 
spoke at some length upon the general subject of reading and 
education. 

ADDRESS OF WILLIAM L. BARBER. 

In the absence of Dr. Edward C. Booth, president of the 
board of trustees, who was detained by illness, William L. Bar- 
ber, a member of the board, made the following address : — 

''Your Honor : In behalf of the board of trustees of the 
Somerville public library, I assure you it is with great pleasure 
that they receive in charge this beautiful building and this most 
welcome addition to our public library service. 

"I very much regret that the chairman of our board, Dr. 
Booth, is unable to be present to-night, and I know that no one 
is more disappointed at his enforced absence than he himself, 
as he has for a long time looked forward to this evening with 
pleasurable anticipation ; and I know that he had something to 
say that would have been of great interest ; but, unfortunately, 
he is confined to his house this evening by serious illness. 

"The board of trustees has for a long time recognized the 
inadequacy of the library accommodations and facilities in this 
portion of our city. They have regretted that more of the 
privileges of our library system could not be more conveniently 
extended to the residents of West Somerville. They have rec- 
ognized not only the great needs, but also the immediate neces- 
sity that some better methods should be provided in order that 
this large portion of our city, containing so large a number of 
our citizens, might enjoy those benefits to which they were so 
justly entitled. 

"This desire on the part of the trustees can be clearly evi- 
denced by referring to the reports of the board of trustees to 
the city government, which have been made from time to time 
during the last three or four years, and in which the needs of 
this particular portion of our city have been clearly set forth, 
and in which an additional appropriation has been requested in 
order that these additional benefits might be provided; but, 
unfortunately, the city government has been unable to make 
the appropriation for this purpose, and the trustees have been 
obliged to do the best they could with the means at their dis- 
posal, and under the agency system, a system never satisfactory 
when applied to so large a portion of a community as this. 

"But now, fortunately, most opportunely, and providen- 
tially, — and I think that I may rightfully use that word, for cer- 
tainly none of us a little more than a year ago would have for 
an instant dreamed that that which has actually come to pass 
could have been possible, — so I say providentially, this beau- 
tiful building has come to us, bringing great benefits, great ad- 
vantages, and also what we believe will prove to be great 
blessings. 



274 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

'The board of trustees are fully aware of the immense 
benefits which will accrue from the erection of this library in 
this portion of our city, and they will do all in their power to 
promote its growth and extend its usefulness. 

"The trustees will, so far as it is possible with the means 
that shall be placed at their disposal by the city government 
for the support and maintenance of this building, aid in its good 
work and development, and they sincerely trust that the ad- 
vantages and pleasure that will certainly result from its admin- 
istration will afford not only satisfaction to yourself, your 
honor, and to the city at large, but especially so to the citizens 
of West Somerville, for whose particular benefit and conven- 
ience this building has been erected." 

ADDRESS OF DR. HORACE Q. WADLIN, 
Librarian of the Boston Public Library. 

"I read not long ago the story of a visit by an American 
librarian to the Laurentian library in Florence, said to be the 
oldest library in the world. Near it are the splendid palaces of 
the old nobility. It is in the shadow of Brunelleschi's dome and 
of Giotto's Campanile. Its grand hall was designed by Michel 
Angelo, and is enriched by exquisite carving and beautiful win- 
dows, the work of unrivaled Florentine artists. It contains 
marvelous books, written by hand with patient labor before the 
age of printing; thousands of manuscripts, and, besides these, 
early printed volumes displaying the revival of interest in 
classic learning, in the dawn of the Renaissance. There are in 
the world no more beautiful specimens of the art of the illu- 
minator or fairer types of the skill of the first printers than it 
contains, to say nothing of the intellectual value of its treas- 
ures, — manuscript editions of Dante and Petrarch, the earliest 
known text of Virgil, the original autograph manuscript of the 
poems of Michel Angelo himself. As a celebrated French 
writer, the Vicomte de Vogue, has said, its librarian 'has under 
his hand the precious collections of the Medici, beautiful ideas, 
sumptuously arrayed, texts and picture, manuscripts brought 
from the Orient, first editions of Italy, Greek books full of 
grace and wisdom, annotated and surcharged by the most 
powerful geniuses of the Renaissance.' 

"This, I say, is the oldest library in the world. Merely to 
read of it stirs the imagination profoundly. It preserves in our 
day the atmosphere of the time of Lorenzo the Magnificent ; and 
within its walls we seem, for the moment, transported to the age 
of the Medici. Beyond, in the sacristy of the Church of San 
Lorenzo, the princes of the line sleep silently. Their pomp and 
glory have departed, while almost unchanged through the cen- 
turies the library stands, in serene and solemn dignity, the rep- 
resentative of an alien world. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 275 

"Unless, by coincidence, some other may claim equal 
honor, we meet to-night to dedicate the newest library in the 
world, this branch in Somerville. Separated from the first by 
more than 400 years, it is no less widely separated by differ- 
ences in aim and purpose. The one represents the aristocracy 
of art and letters, the other democracy, with wider opportunity 
and equal privilege. It is the difference between the fifteenth 
and the twentieth centuries. 

"I need not speak of the turmoil into which we are 
now plunged by the growth of democracy, bringing its immense 
benefits and its tremendous responsibilities. No man within 
their influence fails to understand something, at least, of the 
conflicts which now threaten society, and which the twentieth 
century is to terminate either for good or ill ; conflicts between 
poverty and wealth, between ignorance and culture, between 
privilege and restricted opportunity. Through them humanity, 
in pursuit of an ever-advancing ideal, is either to pass to a 
higher plane, by orderly progress under law, or is to suffer a 
violent overturn of all that has thus far been won. 

"Nowhere are the lines more sharply drawn or the differ- 
ent elements more widely separated than in our growing towns 
and cities ; and nowhere are unity of spirit and devotion to a 
common ideal more to be desired. We are trying to solve a 
problem more difficult than ever before proposed, — the unify- 
ing, in the bonds of a common citizenship, of large masses of 
people without a common lineag'e, a common mother tongue,, or 
similar traditions and impulses. And for our success we are 
relying principally upon the influence of our various civic insti- 
tutions and the power of an enlightened public opinion. 

"The roots of the present are buried in the past, but civili- 
zation does not remain dormant. It unfolds and broadens 
under the power of the mysterious forces which promote its 
growth. It is well for us to clearly perceive their trend. It is 
not always easy to do this. The petty, the unimportant things 
are apt to engross us. But beneath these are the permanent 
forces, perhaps the one permanent force that makes for our na- 
tional and civic welfare. 

"Under its transforming power, men of good will are 
everywhere seeking, not merely in our country, but elsewhere, 
peace, brotherhood, and the widening of individual oppor- 
tunity. The ideals of citizenship are slowly changing. The 
old barriers that kept men apart have been thrown down. 
The realization of a new ideal is seen in the movement for 
arbitration instead of war, in the curtailment of special privi- 
lege, in the broadening of the public schools, in the extension 
of municipal functions, in various forms of municipal owner- 
ship, the provision of parks and libraries, the improvement of 
tenement quarters in cities, and in the cultivation of beauty as 
an element in civic life. Thus society is ever moving in the 



276 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

direction of broader communal activity; that is, towards the 
things we all of us may do for each other and for the general 
welfare. This throws a heavier responsibility upon citizenship. 
The things we are trying to accomplish by means of our votes 
and through our various civic activities are constantly becoming 
more complex and difficult. 

"In the work to which we are committed, the public library 
is of great assistance, for in books are embodied the wisdom of 
the past, the aspirations of the present, and the hope for the 
future. Books are the tools and instruments of knowledge, and 
under modern conditions have an even more important place 
than in the past. 

"I know that the beneficial influence of much reading has 
often been disputed, and that now as in the past there are those 
who distrust the power of the printed page. There are others 
who would hedge books about with a divinity, and thus pre- 
vent their general use. The aristocracy of letters, like other 
aristocracies, is disinclined to surrender its privilege to the 
many. 

"But the fear of the book as a disturber of the peace is in 
itself a witness to the power of the book, if a good book, in the 
opposite direction. The use of good books promotes com- 
munity of action and dissipates ignorance and prejudice, and 
the larger tolerance of the present as compared with the past is 
in no small part due to the influence of such books. Books 
thus become the connecting link between the historic past and 
the living present, between the world of thought and the world 
of deed. And their usefulness in this way is open to all 
through the medium of the public library. 

"Professor Jevons once pointed out in an effective para- 
graph the wider opportunity which such a library affords. Tf a 
beautiful picture is hung in a private house,' he said, 'it may be 
gazed at by a few guests a score or two of times in the year. 
If it is hung in a public gallery it will be enjoyed by hundreds of 
thousands of persons whose glances, it need hardly be said, do 
not wear out the canvas. The same principle applies to books 
in common ownership. If a man possesses a library of a few 
thousand volumes, by far the greater part of them must be for 
v years untouched upon the shelves ; he cannot possibly use 
more than a fraction of the whole in any one year. But a public 
library of five or ten thousand volumes may be used a thousand 
times as much. It is a striking case of what I call the multipli- 
cation of utility.' 

"The Laurentian library was and still is the possession of 
the few;, the great nobles created it, and it represents an intel- 
lectual world from which the many were excluded. Its books 
were chained to the reading desks, and these still remain as 
types of mediaeval exclusiveness. But this branch, like your 
central library, like the public library of to-day everywhere, is 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 277 

for all, that all may have an equal opportunity to share in the 
intellectual benefits which books confer. 

"The public library is therefore in the highest degree rep- 
resentative of democratic thought and aspiration. It is in this 
way set apart from all other libraries. It is above all else a 
modern institution of an advanced type, instinct with life and 
movement. Its office is not merely to keep literature from 
perishing, although it should preserve with especial care the 
literary records of local history and of current events. But 
it is established chiefly to make books instruments of human 
welfare and a broader culture among the weaker folk, the men 
and women who make up the rank and file of our great indus- 
trial towns and cities. Not merely to pass on the torch from 
generation to generation, but to let its light shine here and now, 
illumining minds heretofore dark. This, above all other func- 
tions, is its prime duty, and in doing this it renders its highest 
service to the community. 

"That the public library may be of the greatest possible 
usefulness, its agencies are multiplied. Its books are lent with 
as little formality as possible to the schools, and to other public 
institutions and to study classes. A central collection is no 
longer sufficient to meet the public need. Branches and de- 
livery stations bring the books close to the reader and open 
them to wider public use. Each branch becomes an intellectual 
centre for its own district. The residents of the neighborhood 
may regard the branch as their special library. Here they may 
acquire the love of books as a source of innocent enjoyment, 
the help of books in the development of intellectual power and 
in the enrichment of life. Here, too, the children will soon 
know the custodian as counselor and friend. Here they will 
find, no doubt, a carefully-selected collection of such books as 
children love, — stories, travels, history, biography, and nature 
books. The advantages which a few exceptionally favored 
children now have at home, this branch will freely offer to all 
children. Some one has said that a great love of books is like 
a personal introduction to the great and good of all times. 
This personal introduction the public library through all its 
agencies aims to give to those who will accept its ministrations. 

"Through such a branch as this, those who administer the 
library come into closer personal relations with those who use 
it than is otherwise possible. The librarian who is to have 
charge here will soon know you intimately. She will have op- 
portunities to discover your personal needs in regard to books 
and to supply them. 

"Through this multiplication of its agencies for distribu- 
tion, the public library confers unquestioned benefits upon the 
individual citizen, but it does not exist primarily for the indi- 
vidual. Its only warrant for maintenance as a civic institution 
is that through the benefits received by the individual larger 
community benefits result. 



278 ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 

"Its work with the children, its aid to the artisan and me- 
chanic in enlarging their industrial efficiency, its benefits to the 
general reader who comes to it for relaxation from the activi- 
ties of our sometimes too strenuous industrial and business 
life, — these finally broaden into social benefits, as those who use 
the opportunities it offers become better fitted to meet and 
mingle in their various civic relations. 

"The idea still persists that, since the great libraries of the 
world, however useful, were principally used by scholars or lit- 
erary folk, so the public library is mainly for the few. That 
was not the idea which inspired those who originated it. They 
intended by means of it to carry still farther our system of 
popular education. 

"The public schools exist not for the benefit of the in- 
dividual, but for the benefit of the community. From that point 
of view the sort of education given in them is to be considered. 
And as Dr. Richardson, the scholarly librarian of Princeton 
University, once put it, 'A public library exists not for the bene- 
fit it will be to John Smith, but for the benefit the benefiting of 
John Smith will be to the community. It is because John 
Smith's improvement is of value to the community as a whole 
that taxation is justifiable for the support of libraries, no less 
than for the schools.' That, I am sure, is also the view of Mr. 
Carnegie in his gifts to these institutions. 

"This conception of the purpose of such libraries helps in 
the solution of various problems of management. Take the 
question of the selection of books for your more or less incom- 
pletely-filled shelves. Shall demand be the guide? Shall the 
book asked for by the largest number be the one bought? Let 
us see. Tf a book used by John Smith only will benefit the 
community more than another used by fifty or 100 persons, 
that book is the more suitable for purchase. For the value of 
a book to the community does not necessarily depend upon the 
number of persons who use it, but upon the net product of value 
growing out of the increased social efficiency of, it may be, the 
one person only who uses it.' The value of the public library, 
therefore, as a civic institution depends upon the success with 
which it promotes, through all its agencies, 'common honesty, 
common sentiment, common happiness, and common action.' 

"You can only get the best out of it by using it. This 
youngest library in the world is meant for use. For that pur- 
pose it is established directly at your doors. It is the friendly 
hand of the greater institution on the hill yonder, reaching out 
for the especial welfare of this part of your city. Things not 
fully used, no matter how valuable, become to that extent 
merely a burden. There is an old New England phrase that 
designates the possessor of unused land, which is merely a 
source of expense for taxes without bringing in revenue, as 
'land poor.' The equipment of such a library as this, if not 



1 TUBLIC LIBRARY. 279 

utilized, becomes of no more value than such unused land, and 
these books, if not read, might as well be burned, or chained up, 
as of old in that grand Laurentian library. 

"Are you interested in any special subject?" Would you 
like to have a wider knowledge of the world's progress and his- 
tory, or of the great changes that have occurred in scientific 
thought during the last fifty years? Or something about the 
growth of our great industries? Or perhaps something of the 
literature of your own trade or profession? Or become ac- 
quainted with at least a few of the great writers? This branch 
will contain something for you among these subjects. It is es- 
tablished and will be maintained to help you. If you want any- 
thing that it can furnish, ask for it. The custodian is here 
partly to respond to your queries. If you ask questions that she 
cannot immediately answer, which is possible, she will, no 
doubt, if given opportunity, find answers. If you want a 
book which is not here, no doubt it will be obtained for you 
upon request, or perhaps a better one substituted for it. 

"Speaking of the influence of books in disseminating ad- 
vanced ideas, Voltaire remarks : 'Twenty-volume folios will 
never cause a revolution. It is the little portable volumes . . . 
that are to be feared/ It is, I think, true that the little portable 
volumes are the ones to be loved. You have a great advantage 
in a library like this, since its books, like its building, are new. 
The collection, as it grows from day to day, need contain 
nothing that is not immediately useful in the world of the pres- 
ent. The foundations of the great libraries are often laid with 
great books, too ponderous to read, heavy literature in every 
sense. That repository of curious information, Tn a Club Cor- 
ner,' recounts that the first books given to Dartmouth College 
were of this kind, old folios, some of them two feet long, 
eighteen inches wide, and six inches thick. 'An old librarian of 
the college has said that these old folios were never read. 
Those who affected to know more than their classmates took 
them out. One learned senior told him he always had three 
charged to him, one for a footstool, one for a cushion for his 
chair, and one for his water pail to rest on.' 

"Here there is lacking the flavor of antiquity, and books 
will not be bought for hoarding behind glass cases, or for the 
beauty of their bindings. There is little of the sentiment 
that lingers within the walls of the old libraries, where through 
the ages studious men have walked, and pondered, and 
dreamed, written their poem, or essay, or sermon for the bene- 
fit of their fellows, lived their short lives, and passed away; old 
libraries, like the Laurentian, with its priceless treasures, or the 
Bodleian, the oldest library in England, where the sun streams 
through the high windows upon the dark old volumes of for- 
gotten lore. 

" f But there is one glory of the sun, and another glory of 



280 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

the moon, and another glory of the stars, for one star differeth 
from another star in glory.' It is the proud distinction of this 
newest library that, without the beauty that is consecrated by 
time, without the treasures of art and literature that the world 
rightly counts among its dearest possessions, it nevertheless 
stands as an efficient agency in hastening the dawn of a new 
day. It possesses the glory of present service rather than that 
of past achievement. This branch would have never come into 
being except for the .intellectual treasures which those older 
libraries contain ; but its peculiar office is to turn into popular 
channels the life-giving stream that springs perennially from 
the ancient fountains. 

''Contrasting these volumes in active use, few though they 
may be, and of little value as compared with the splendid col- 
lections of the great libraries or the beautifully-bound volumes 
of the private collector, I leave with you the hope that by 
using them you may have towards them something of the feel- 
ing that Dobson expresses as to the books in his own library : — 

" 'They dwell in the odour of camphor, 
They stand in a Sheraton shrine, 
They are "warranted early editions," 
Those worshipful tomes of mine; — 

" 'In their creamiest "Oxford vellum," 
In their redolent "crushed Levant," 
With their delicate watered linings, 
They are jewels of price, I grant; — 

*' 'Blind-tooled and morocco-jointed, 

They have Zaehnsdorf's daintiest dress, 
They are graceful, attenuate, polished, 
But they gather the dust, no less; — 

" 'For the row that I prize is yonder, 
Away on the unglazed shelves, 
The bulged and bruised octavos, 
The dear and the dumpy twelves,- - 

"'Montaigne with his sheepskin blistered, 
And Howell the worse for wear, 
And the worm-drilled Jesuits' Horace, 
And the little old cropped Moliere, 

" 'And the Burton I bought for a florin, 
And the Rabelais foxed and flea'd, — 
For the others I never have opened, 
But those are the books I read.' " 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



1909. 



Allen F. Carpenter, Chairman. 

Zebedee E. Cliff. 
Albert C. Aldrich, M. D. 

Clerk and Agent to Issue Burial Permits. 

William P. Mitchell. 

Agent. 
Caleb A. Page. 

Medical Inspector. 

Frank L. Morse, M. D. 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions. 

Charles M. Berry. 

flilk Inspector. 

Julius E. Richardson (died October 12, 1909;; 
Herbert E. Bowman (appointed December 0, 1909). 

Plumbing Inspector. 

Duncan C. Greene. 

Superintendent Collection of Ashes and Offal. 

Edgar T. Mayhew. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Office of the Board of Health, ) 
City Hall, January 1, 1910. ) 

To Hi's Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen, — We respectfully submit the following as the 
thirty-second annual report of the board of health, in which is 
presented a statement, tabulated and otherwise, of the sanitary 
condition of the city and the business of the board for the year 
ending December 31, 1909 : — 



Nuisances. 

A record of nuisances abated during the year, in compli- 
ance with notices issued by the board, or under the board's 
direction, is presented in the following table : — 



NUISANCES ABATED IN THE CITY IN 1909. 



Bakery offensive 

Barber shops 

Cellar damp 

Cesspool offensive 

Cow barn offensive 

Cows kept without license 

Drainage defective 

Drainage emptying into cellar 

Drainage emptying on surface 

Fish offal .... 

Food exposed to dust 

Goats kept without license 

Hens in cellar 

Hennery offensive 

Hens without permit . 

Manure exposed and offensive 

Manure pit defective . 

Offal on land 

Offensive odor in and about dwellin 

Pigs kept without license 

Premises dirty 

Privy-vault offensive . 

Rubbish in cellar 

Slops thrown on surface . 

Stable infected with glanders 

Stable and stable premises filthy an 

Stable without drainage . 

Stagnant water on surface 

Water-closet defective 

Water under stable 



gs 



d offensive 



6 

1 
14 

3 
11 

4 
21 

9 
13 

3 
15 

2 

3 
11 
14 

9 
11 

4 

5 

2 
108 

4 
12 

8 
43 
19 
15 

7 
21 

5 



Total 



403 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 283 

Number of nuisances abated 403 

Number of nuisances referred to board of 1909 . 14 

Number of nuisances complained of 417 
Number of complaints (many covering more than 

one nuisance) 348 

In addition to the above, 392 dead animals have been re- 
moved from the public streets, and many nuisances have been 
abated on verbal notice from the agent, without action by the 
board, of which no record has been made. Each spring the 
whole city is examined, and cellars, yards, and alleyways where 
rubbish and filth have collected are required to be cleaned. 

Glanders. — Forty-three cases of glanders have been re- 
ported during the year. Prompt action was taken in every 
case, and forty of the horses were killed, three being released 
from quarantine by order of the cattle commissioners. 

Permits. 

The record of permits to keep cows, swine, and hens, and 
to collect grease is as follows : — 

Cows. — Thirty applications were received for permits to 
keep seventy-five cows. Twenty-seven permits to keep sixty- 
six cows were granted, and three permits were refused. _ 

Swine. — Fifteen applications were received for permits to 
keep twenty-nine swine. Fourteen permits were granted to 
keep twenty-eight swine, and one permit was refused. The fee 
is one dollar for each swine. 

Hens. — Sixty-three applications for permits to keep 1,144 
hens were received. Forty-two permits to keep 709 hens were 
granted, and twenty-one permits were refused. 

Grease. — Twelve applications were received for permits to 
collect grease, all of which were granted. The fee is two dollars. 
Four of the parties licensed reside in Somerville, two in 
Charlestown, two in Cambridge, three in Boston, and one in 
Chelsea. 

Melting and Rendering. — Four parties have been licensed to 
carry on the business of melting and rendering, under the pro- 
visions of the revised laws of 1902, chapter 75, section 111. 

Pedlers. 

One hundred and thirty-eight certificates of registration 
were issued to hawkers and pedlers during the year under the 
provisions of ordinance number 27 — a decrease of 134 from the 
year 1908. One hundred and forty-three certificates have been 
renewed during the year. Each pedler is required to present a 
statement from the sealer of weights and measures, showing that 
his measures have been properly sealed, before a certificate is 



284 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

issued to him. Pedlers are also required to present their vehi- 
cles at the police station the first Monday of each month for in- 
spection by the agent of the board, that he may see if they are 
kept in a clean condition, and are properly marked with the 
owner's name and number. 

Ashes and Offal. 

The collection and disposal of ashes, garbage, and other 
refuse materials is under the control of the board of health, and 
a competent superintendent is employed to take charge of this 
department. 

To do this work seventy men are employed, and the de- 
partment owns and uses thirty-four horses, twenty ash carts, 
five paper wagons, and thirteen garbage wagons. 

Ashes. — The ashes and non-combustible materials are de- 
posited upon the city dumps at Winter Hill and West Somer- 
ville. The combustible materials are burned in the incinerator 
which was built last year near the city stables, except those ma- 
terials which can be sold at a profit, such as clean paper, rags, 
and bottles. 

During the year 48,506 loads of ashes and 3,300 loads of 
refuse material have been collected and disposed of. 

Collections are made weekly, and the districts and days of 
collection are as follows : — 

MONDAY, DISTRICT NO. 1. 

Comprises the entire area extending easterly to the cities of Boston 
and Cambridge, from a line drawn across Somerville, commencing on 
Mystic avenue, and extending through Cross street, Central square, 
Medford street, Washington street, Prospect street, Webster avenue, 
Tremont street to the Cambridge line, and including collection on both 
sides of the above-named streets along the division line described. 

TUESDAY, DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Comprises the entire area extending westerly from the previously- 
described district number 1 to a line drawn across the city, commencing 
on Mystic avenue, and extending through Wheatland street, across 
Broadway, through Walnut street, and extending across Bow street 
and Somerville avenue, through Hawkins street, Washington street, 
Perry street, Wyatt street, Concord avenue, crossing Beacon street to 
the Cambridge line, and including collection on both sides of the above- 
named streets along the division line described. 

WEDNESDAY, DISTRICT NO. 3. 

Comprises the entire area extending westerly from the previously- 
described district number 2, to a line drawn across the city, commenc- 
ing at the Medford boundary line at Main street, and extending easterly 
along said Main street, across Broadway, through Sycamore street, 
thence easterly on Highland avenue, through School street, thence 
westerly on Somerville avenue, through Dane street and Washington 
street to the Cambridge line, and including the collection on both sides 
of the above-named streets along the division line described. 



Health department. 285 

THURSDAY, DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Comprises the entire area extending westerly from the previously- 
described district number 3, to a line drawn across the city, commenc- 
ing at the Medford line at Magoun square, and extending on Medford 
street to Lowell street, thence easterly on Somerville avenue and 
through Park street to the Cambridge line, and including the collection 
on both sides of the above-named streets along the division line de- 
scribed. 

FRIDAY, DISTRICT NO. 5. 

Comprises the entire area extending westerly from the previously- 
described district number 4, to a line drawn across the city, commenc- 
ing on Broadway, and extending through Willow avenue to the Cam- 
bridge line, and including the collection on both sides of the above- 
named streets along the division line described. 

SATURDAY, DISTRICT NO. 6. 

Comprises the entire area extending westerly from Willow avenue 
to the Medford, Arlington, and Cambridge lines. 

Offal. — During the year the board has continued to dispose 
of the city offal at its garbage plant adjacent to the city stables. 
This offal is sold direct to farmers and others, and is handled in 
a thoroughly sanitary and satisfactory manner. The demand 
for the garbage has exceeded the supply, and in its disposal 
there has been an entire absence of objectionable features. The 
financial returns to the city are large. 

During the year 7,900 loads of offal have been collected. 

Two collections are made in each district weekly, and dur- 
ing the summer months an extra collection is made at hotels, 
stores, and other establishments producing large quantities of 
offal. 

Stables. 

Under the provisions of sections 69 and 70 of chapter 102 
of the revised laws of 1902, twenty-nine petitions for licenses to 
erect and use stables were received and disposed of as fol- 
lows : — 

Number granted 15 

Number refused 14 

Board of Infants. 

Fourteen parties, whose applications were first approved 
by this board, have been licensed by the state board of charity 
to care for thirty-seven children, in this city, under the pro- 
visions of chapter 83 of the revised laws of 1902. 

Deaths. 

There were 988 deaths and sixty-four stillbirths in the city 
during the year, as specified in the following table, which shows 
an increase of deaths over the previous year of eighty-five. 



SS6 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Deaths at Somerville hospital during the year 
Deaths at Cherry-street hospital 
Deaths at hospital for contagious diseases . 
Deaths at home for aged poor (Highland avenue) 
Deaths at City home 



60 

2 

24 

65 

7 



DEATHS BY AGES. 



Ages. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Under one ........ 


169 


93 


76 


One to two . 
















29 


19 


10 


Two to three. 
















18 


11 


7 


Three to four 
















5 


3 


o 


Four to five . 
















9 


6 


o 


Five to ten . 
















20 


11 


9 


Ten to fifteen 
















16 


7 


9 


Fifteen to twenty 
















22 


10 


12 


Twenty to thirty 
















52 


31 


21 


Thirty to forty 
















72 


29 


43 


Forty to fifty 
















73 


31 


42 


Fifty to sixty 
















94 


44 


50 


Sixty to seventy . 
















145 


59 


86 


Seventy to eighty 
















175 


84 


91 


Eighty to ninety 
















75 


29 


46 


Ninety and over . 
















14 


4 


10 


Total 
















98S 


471 


517 



Of the stillborn, 41 were males and 23 females. 



HEALTn DEPARTMENT. 



28? 



Mortality in Somerville in 1909. 





u 

rt 
3 
P 
ret 
>-| 


a 

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fa 


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U 


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3 
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6 
u 

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0) 







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V 

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u 

> 


55 


V 

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B 

V 

u 

w 




H 


I. General Disease 
(A . Epidemic Diseases 


s. 

.) 
«.) 

vous 


"2 

4 

i" 
1 
1 

"2 

"1 
1 

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i 

i 

1 

*3* 
1 

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1 

4 


1 

3 
3 


















1 


s 




as 

EF 


2 
2 
1 


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1 

2 












g 


Diphtheria 

Typhoid fever .... 

Erysipelas 

Dysentery 

La grippe 

Measles ■ 

(2?. Other General Dist 

Addison's Disease. • • 
Septicaemia .... 
Rheumatism .... 


2 


3 


2 


4 


1 

2 


3 
1 


27 

8 












1 


4 

i' 

2 
1 

*3* 


1 

.... 

1 

2 

i 

1 


1 

i 


.... 

1 

.... 






1 










3 


1 






1 

1 
1 


8 


1 


1 




3 

1 

4 



























1 


1 


6 


Cancer of anus 


2 


2 


1 


2 
1 






2 


Cancer of bladder . 










9 


Cancer of breast . . . 


1 




2 


1 


14 
1 


Cancer intestines . . 
Cancer of leg .... 
Cancer of lung .... 
Cancer liver and kidneys 
Cancer of stomach . . 
Cancer of tongue . . . 
Cancer of jaw and throat 
Cancer of uterus . . . 


2 
2 
1 

2 

i 


1 


2 


1 


2 




1 




2 


1 


1 


13 

2 


1 

2 
1 


1 

2 

.... 

3 


1 


1 
1 














2 


1 
1 


1 

1 


1 

1 


1 


2 
.... 

2 
1 


1 
2 
1 

3 


8 

13 

1 

2 




3 




2 




1 


17 

2 


Hepatic cancer .... 
Sarcoma of heart and spine 
Sarcoma of neck . . . 
















1 








i 






1 








1 








1 


Pelvic sarcoma .... 














1 


Syphilis 


1 
1 

i' 
10 
1 

1 
12 


.... 

7 
1 

"3 

1 


1 

1 

3 
1 

8 


















2 


Tumor 


1 
3 

7 
2 

i 
















3 


Exophthalmic goitre 

Glanders 

Diabetes 

Tuberculosis .... 
Tubercular meningitis . 
Tuberculosis of intestines 
















3 


3 

8 
1 
1 


.... 

4 
1 


*2 

7 
1 


*2 

5 


1 

7 
1 


4 

1 


1 

7 


1 
11 

77 

10 

1 


Tubercular peritonitis . 














1 


Tuberculosis of spine 
II. Diseases of the ^ 

System. 
Meningitis 






1 

7 


3 

1 


1 

3 
1 


1 

G 
1 

1 
1 


3 

2 

i 


1 
4 


Apoplexy 

Paralysis 

Brain diseases 

Convulsions ... 


8 


8 
"l 


6 
1 
1 


70 

7 
4 
3 


Neuritis 


' i' 


1 
1 
1 


3 
1 


1 


1 


1 








2 


Hemiplegia ...... 

Epilepsy 

Myelitis 

Eclampsia 

Paresis 


1 


i 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 
1 


9 
3 
3 
1 
1 


Tetanus 














1 




1 

9 
"3 


1 

8 

"i 


1 


Cerebro-spinal meningitis . . . 


6 
2 
3 

19 

2 

"2 


7 
1 
3 

13 
6 

"2 
1 


8 
1 
1 

18 
2 

1 
1 
2 


1 

6 

1 

12 

5 


1 

10 

1 
.... 

10 
3 

1 








4 


III. Diseases of the ( 

tory System. 
Heart disease .... 

Endocarditis 

Myocarditis 

Pericarditis . .... 


:ir 

IE! 


CULA- 
PIRA- 


5 
1 

9 
1 
1 
1 


4 
1 

2 

3 
1 


7 
1 

i 

1 

1 


4 
2 

2 


6 
.... 


80 
9 

18 
1 


Angina pectoris .... 

IV. Diseases of the I 
tory System. 

Pneumonia 

Bronchitis 

Asthma 


2 

2 


1 

6 
1 


10 
1 


1 

10 
1 
1 


4 

113 

25 

3 


Pulmonary oedema . . . 
Empyema . . , . . . 
Pleurisy 






1 


2 


1 


9 
3 

2 



288 



AXXFAL ETTORTS. 



MORTALITY IN SOMERVILLE IN 1009.— Concluded. 















•*- 








>> 


»- 








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3 

a 


- 

— 
ft) 

fa 


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la 

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ft* 


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3 


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ft) 


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5 


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£ 


« 



Uki- 



V. Diseases of the Digestive 
System. 

Acute indigestion 
Colitis .... 
Gastritis .... 
Peritonitis . . . 
Diarrhoea . . . 
Cholera infantum . 
Ptomaine poisoning 
Gastric ulcer 
Enteritis . . . 
Intestinal obstruction 
Abscess gall bladder 
Abcess of kidney . 
Appendicitis . . . 
Cirrhosis liver . . . 
Gall stones .... 

VI. Diseases ob Gem 

nary System. 

Blight's disease 
Cystitis . 

Nephritis . . 
Pyelitis . . . 

VI [, Childbirth. 
Childbirth . . 

VIII. Diseases of the Skin and 
Cellular Tissue. 

Abscess 

Gangrene 

IX. Malformations. 

Hydrocephalus 

X. Early Infancy. 

Marasmus 

Inanition 

Icterus neonatorum 

Premature birth and congenital 

debility 

XI. Old Age. 

Old age 

Senile dementia 

Arterio-sclerosis ....... 

XII. Violence. 

Automobile 
Alcoholism . , 
Drowning . 
Railroad . . . 
Suicide . . . 
Burning . . . 
Suffocation . . 
Sunstroke ■ . 
Fracture of hip 
Fracture of skull 
Fracture of ribs 
Fracture of thigh 
Injury* to pelvis 



Total 
Stillborn 



11 



100 
3 



SO 
5 



K7 
3 



S3 
S 



Population ( estimated ) 
Death rate per thousand 



75,500 
13.1 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



289 



Social Relations of Decedents. 



Married 

Single 

Widow 

Widower 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Total 



299 

424 

186 

77 

2 





Nativity of Decedents. 



Somerville .... 

Massachusetts 

Other New England states . 

Other states .... 

Canada 

England, Scotland, and Wales 

Ireland 

Italy 

Norway and Sweden 
Russia ..... 
Other countries 
Unknown .... 



Total 



Nativity of Parents of Decedents. 



988 



257 

201 

124 

79 

88 

41 

128 

26 

13 

9 

17 
5 



Father. Mother. 

24 31 



148 
162 
41 
96 
58 
287 
49 
39 
17 
50 
17 



161 

139 
32 

121 
61 

263 
47 
41 
15 
56 
21 



Somerville .... 

Massachusetts 

Other New England states 

Other states 

Canada and provinces 

England, Scotland, and Wales 

Ireland 

Italy 

Norway and Sweden 

Russia 

Other countries . 

Unknown 

Total 

Of the parents of the stillborn, 38 fathers and 39 mothers were na- 
tives of the United States, and 26 fathers and 25 mothers were of 
foreign birth. 

Diseases Dangerous to the Public Health. 

This board has adjudged that the diseases known as acti- 
nomycosis, Asiatic cholera, cerebro-spinal meningitis, diph- 
theria, glanders, leprosy, malignant pustule, measles, scarlet 
fever, smallpox, tetanus, trichinosis, tuberculosis, typhoid fever, 
typhus fever, varicella, whooping-cough, and yellow fever are 
infectious, or contagious, and dangerous to the public health 
and safety within the meaning of the statutes. Physicians are 
required to report immediately to the board every case of either 
of these diseases coming under their care, and postal cards con- 
veniently printed and addressed are supplied to them for the 



290 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

purpose. On receipt of a card from a physician, the superin- 
tendent of schools, the principal of the school in the district in 
which the patient resides, and the librarian of the public library 
are notified, and state board of health. 

Scarlet Fever. — Three hundred twenty cases of scarlet fever 
have been reported during the year, nine of which resulted 
fatallv. In 1908 there were 283 cases, four of which resulted 
fatally. 

Diphtheria. — Three hundred thirty-four cases of diphtheria 
have been reported during the year, twenty-seven of which were 
fatal. In 1908 there were 278 cases, eleven of which proved 
fatal. Anti-toxin has been provided by the state board of health, 
and placed by this board in central locations for use by physi- 
cians in cases where people are unable to purchase the same. 
Culture tubes for diphtheria and sputum bottles for suspected 
tuberculosis have been obtainable at the same stations. 

Warning cards are used in dealing with scarlet fever and 
with diphtheria, and the premises are fumigated by the use of 
the formaldehyde gas regenerator, immediately after the termi- 
nation of the case. An inspection is made by the agent of the 
board of the premises where diphtheria is reported, and all sani- 
tary defects discovered are required to be remedied as soon as 
possible. 

Tuberculosis. — One hundred forty-four cases of tuberculo- 
sis have been reported during the year. There were seventy- 
seven deaths from this disease. 

Typhoid Fever. — Ninety-nine cases of typhoid fever have 
been reported during the year, eight of which have proved fatal. 
In 1908 there were sixty-four cases reported, nine of which were 
fatal. 

Typhus Fever, Cholera. — No cases of typhus fever or cholera 
have been reported the past year. 

Smallpox. — One case of smallpox has been reported during 
the year. 

Number of persons with diphtheria or scarlet fever taken in am- 
bulance to hospital by agent 220 

Number of cases of scarlet fever and diphtheria for which houses 

were placarded . . . . 654 

Number of premises disinfected by agent 1,016 

It will be seen by the foregoing figures that, in addition to 
the 654 premises infected with scarlet fever or diphtheria, 362 
other premises were disinfected. Thirty-five disinfections were 
made at the request of attending physicians whose patients had 
been ill with typhoid fever or cancer. One hundred and eighty- 
eight schoolrooms were disinfected, 117 for scarlet fever, sixty- 
eight for diphtheria, and 139 premises for tuberculosis, in com- 
pliance with the regulations passed by this board. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



291 



Many library books have also been disinfected, and quan- 
tities of infected bedding and other material have been burned. 

TABLES. 

The prevalence of scarlet fever, diphtheria, and typhoid 
fever in the city during the several months of the year 1909 is 
shown by the following table, and in the table next following is 
given the number of deaths from these three diseases, by 
months, during the last ten years : — 

Scarlet Fever, Diphtheria, and Typhoid Fever Reported in 1909. 









Scarlet Fever. 


Diphtheria. 


Typhoid Fever. 


Months. 


T3 


M-l 
O 


0) * 

So !2 


T3 


o 


<0 . 


T3 


O 


Ph o 




3~ 

u & 


-S3 

6 «J 


g « 

PL, O 


(4 




gS 




Number 
Deaths 


January . . . 


53 


2 


3.8 


38 


4 


10.5 


l 






February . 




31 


1 


3.2 


23 


4 


17.4 




.... 


.... 


March . 






30 


3 


10. 


23 


3 


13. 


i 






April . . 






24 


2 


8.3 


29 


2 


6.9 


4 


i 


*25. 


May . . 






41 






27 


1 


3.7 


6 


.... 


.... 


June . . 






17 


1 


5.9 


28 


2 


7.1 


4 




.... 


July . . 






12 






39 


2 


5.1 


3 




.... 


August . 






12 


.... 




22 


3 


13.6 


5 


.... 


.... 


September 






12 


.... 


.... 


22 


2 


.... 


17 




.... 


October 






25 




.... 


31 




.... 


35 


4 


11.4 


November 






29 




.... 


32 


i 


3.1 


15 


2 


13.3 


December 






34 


.... 


.... 


20 


3 


15. 


8 


1 


12.5 


Total. . . . 


320 


9 


2.8 


334 


27 


8.1 


99 


8 


8.1 



Deaths from Scarlet Fever, Diphtheria, and Typhoid Fever 
in the Last Ten Years. 





Scarlet Fever. 


Diphtheria. 


Typhoid Fever. • 




Months. 


© Uh 

o © 

© © 

.-1 l-t 


3 © © © O 
JS OS OS © © 
H T-l I i—l r-t tH 


fe «J 2 

O c, © 

3 .J 2 

. 2 .. 1 

. •• 1 3 
1 .... 2 

■ 1 l •• 


o 
o 

© 
t-I 

7 
1 

2 


© 

10 

4 

1 2 


(N M •* lO 
O O O O 

ro o> ro ffl 

T-l r-t T-( r-( 

4 13.' 
..23! 

.. 3 .. . 

1 .. 1 

2 2 3 
.. 1 .. 

1 .. 1 . 

1 2 1 . 
.. 2 .. 

2 2 .. 


to t- °° 

© © © 

OS OS os 

rl H H 

$ .. 1 1 

I 2 .. .. 
. 2 .. 1 
I 5 .. 2 
12 11 

1 .. 1 .. 

.!.. i l 

. .. .. i 

2 2 .. .. 


OS 

o 

© 

4 
4 
3 
2 
1 
2 
2 
3 
2 


©' 
o 

OS 

.-i 

"i 
i 

i 
l 

3 

2 

9 


o 

C5 
1 

2 

i 

i 

3 

1 

3 
12 


a 

cs 

i 

l 

l 

i 

l 

l 

6 


CO 

© 

© 

3 
1 
1 

1 

2 

2 

10 


s 

tH 
1 

i 

i 
i 
l 

2 

3 

1 

11 


© 

© 

T-l 
1 

2 
1 

i 

3 

1 

9 


© 

© 

OS 

i 

l 

3 
2 

i 

1 

2 

11 


t- 

© 
© 

H 
1 

1 

i 

i 

4 

3 

11 


GO 
© 
© 

1 
1 

2 
1 
1 

i 

l 
l 

9 


© 
© 

OS 


January . . 
February . . 
March . . 
April . . . 

June . . . 


"i "i 
.. 1 

2 .. 


i 2 i i . 

.. .. i i . 


1 




" T' T 


5 3 

i Jl 
4 .. 

9 1 

. 6 3 




August . . 
September . 
October . . 
November . 
December 


.... 


...... l . 






il.. 




.11. 


4 


2(.. 

1 .. 

7 E 


ii.. 

1 3 1 .. 
3 10 3 4 


.11. 

. 2 .. . 

112 4 


. 3 2 3 2.. 
. 4 15 2 2 


3 112 

3 14 2 

17 15 9 11 


1 
3 

27 


2 
1 


Total . . 


9 4 


9 25 


> 19 19 14 ] 


8 



292 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table of Deaths During the Last Ten Years. 

Year. 

1900 . 

1901 . 

1902 . 

1903 . 

1904 . 

1905 . 

1906 . 

1907 . 

1908 . 

1909 . 
Average death rate per 1,000 for ten years 

Table Showing the Five Principal Causes of Death in Somerviile in 

1909. 



No. of 


Rate per 


)eaths. 


1,000. 


967 


16 


831 


13 


890 


13 


955 


14 


964 


14 


968 


14 


1,004 


14 


997 


14 


903 


12 


988 


13 




14 



Pneumonia. 


Heart 
Disease. 


Nephritis. 


Cancer. 


Tuberculosis. 


as 

— n 


Number per 
10,000 of Pop. 


— r. 


Number per 
10,000 of Pop. 


P w 


So. 
&^ 

u O 

11 

|2 


Number of 
Deaths. 


Number per 
10,000 of Pop. 


Number of 
Deaths. 


k- o 

IS 


113 


14.9 


112 


14.8 


94 


12.5 


83 


11. 


77 


10.2 



Medical Inspection of Schools. 

The medical inspection of the schools of Somerviile, which 
was instituted in December, 1907, has been continued during 
the year. The value of the system has been constantly demon- 
strated, and the work has been done in a very satisfactory man- 
ner. There has been harmony of action between the board of 
health and the school board, and the school principals and 
teachers have very generally co-operated with the inspectors in 
making the system as successful as possible. 

The inspectors make daily visits to the schools under their 
charge, and to them are referred all children who show evi- 
dences of disease or abnormal conditions. Children who are 
found to be unfit to remain in school are sent home, accom- 
panied by a slip properly filled out advising that the family physi- 
cian be. consulted. The inspectors also make an annual inspec- 
tion of all the children in the schools, and any defects discovered 
are called to the attention of the parents. Monthly inspections 
of the school buildings and premises are made, and suggestions 
or criticisms are referred to the proper authorities. * Every 
effort is made to protect the health of the children and to co- 
operate with the parents in keeping the children in as normal a 
condition as possible. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



293 



In accordance with the provisions of the statute, tests of 
sight and hearing- are made by the principals or teachers. 

During the year 6,051 children have been referred to the in- 
spectors during their daily visits, and 865 have been sent home 
because of illness. 

The following list will show the classes of diseases and de- 
fects which have been found in the schools, except defects of 
sight and hearing : — 

LIST OF DISEASES AND NUHBER OF CASES REPORTED. 
1. Infectious diseases 
Measles 

Whooping coug 
Chicken pox 
Mumps 
Scarlet fever 
Diphtheria 



29 

7 

42 

79 

5 

1 



Total 

2. Diseases of the nose and throat: — 

Enlarged tonsils and adenoids 

Inflammatory diseases 

Other abnormal conditions . . . . 

Total 

3. Diseases of the eyes: — 

Inflammatory conditions of the eyes and lids 
Foreign bodies and injuries . 
Other abnormal conditions . 

Total .... 

4. Diseases of the ears: — 

Inflammatory condition . 
Other abnormal conditions . 



Total . m . 
Diseases of the skin: — 
Pediculosis 
Impetigo 
Scabes 
Eczema 
Tinea 
Herpes 
Miscellaneous conditions 



Total .... 

6. Miscellaneous diseases: — 
Constitutional diseases 
Diseases of the digestive system 
Diseases of the respiratory system 
Diseases of the circulatory system 
Diseases of the lymphatic system 
Diseases of the nervous system . 
Diseases of the urinary system 
Wounds and injuries 
Other conditions . 

Total 



Total number of diseases reported 



718 
177 



20 

7 

56 



17 

29 



693 
55 
40 
32 
7 
12 

146 



40 
61 
63 
21 

74 
28 
58 
42 
119 



163 



903 



83 



46 



985 



506 



. 2,686 



294 ANNUAL KEPORTS. 

The districts and inspectors are as follows : — 

District No. 1. — Prescott, Hanscom, Davis, and Edgerly 

schools. Inspector, Dr. Francis Shaw, 57 Cross street. 

District No. 2. — Baxter, Knapp, Perry, and Bell schools. 

Inspector, Dr. Edw T ard J. Dailey, 46 Bow street. 

District No. 3. — Bennett, Pope, Cummings, and Proctor 
schools. Inspector, Dr. L. H. Raymond, 66 Highland avenue. 

District No. Jf. — Morse, Carr, Durell, and Burns schools. 
Inspector, Dr. W. L. Bond, 322 Highland avenue. 

District No. 5. — Brown, Bingham, and Forster schools. In- 
spector, Dr. H. M. Stoodley, 383 Highland avenue. 

District No. G. — Lincoln, Hodgkms, Highland, and Lowe 
schools. Inspector, Dr. H. Cholerton, 396 Highland avenue. 

District No. 7. — Glines, English High, and Latin High 
schools. Inspector, Dr. R. F. Gibson, 108 Highland avenue. 

Parochial Schools. — Inspector, Dr. M. W. White, 42 Bow 
street. 

Hospital for Contagious Diseases. 

The hospital has continued to demonstrate its value to the 
city during the past year. Many of the cases treated could not 
have been properly cared for at home, and undoubtedly their re- 
moval to the hospital reduced the danger of the spread of the 
diseases. Additional rooms were needed for nurses and help, 
besides laundry and storage accommodations, and on October 
1, 1909, an appropriation of seven thousand dollars was made 
to provide for an addition to the hospital. This has been con- 
structed and furnishes rooms for fourteen additional nurses and 
attendants, and a new laundry, besides increased accommoda- 
tions in the wards. The diet kitchens have been placed in the 
wards, thus making the serving of food much more advantage- 
ous than before. 

On October 15, 1909, the board received and accepted the 
resignation of Miss Nellie J. Van Cor, who had conducted the 
care of patients and the business management of the hospital 
as its matron from the opening of the institution with marked 
success, and she severed her connection therewith on Decem- 
ber 2, 1909. 

On November 3, 1909, the board appointed Miss Edith M. 
Grant, from the South Department of the Boston City Hospital, 
as matron, and she assumed her duties on November 27, 1909. 

The statistical report of the hospital is included in the re- 
port of the medical inspector. 

Bacteriological Department. 

The work of this department was performed by Frank L. 
Morse, M. D., medical inspector of the board, whose report is 
appended to this report : — 



HEALTH DEPAKTMENT. 295 

Specimens will be received at the laboratory at the city hall 
daily, including Sunday, at any time, and they will be examined 
and reported upon the morning following their reception. 

SPECiriENS AND ANTI-TOXIN. 

Outfits for specimens for tuberculosis, diphtheria, and 
typhoid fever, and diphtheria anti-toxin and vaccine lymph may 
be obtained at the laboratory and at the following places :— 

Adams Pharmacy, Willow and Highland avenue. 
Claude Curtis, 154 Perkins street. 
Bay State Pharmacy, 173 Washington street. 
Edward E. Edwards, 25 Union square. 
Fred W. Gay, 524 Somerville avenue. 
Hart Brothers, 263 Highland avenue. 
Percy A. Hall, 2 Studio building, Davis square. 
Herbert E. Bowman, 529 Medford street, Magoun square. 
Eugene B. Carpenter, 10 Broadway. 
Julius E. Richardson, 310 Broadway. 
Paul S. Eaton, 693 Broadway. 
Willis S. Furbush & Co., 1153 Broadway. 
After the specimen is collected, it must be taken or sent 
directly to the laboratory at the city hall. 

Undertakers. 

Under the provisions of section 44 of chapter 78 of the 
revised laws of 1902, twenty-one persons have been duly licensed 
as undertakers. 

Examiners of Plumbers. 

The public statutes provide for a board of examiners of 
plumbers, consisting of a chairman of the board of health, the 
inspector of buildings, and an expert at plumbing, to be ap- 
pointed by the board of health. This board appointed Duncan 
C. Greene, the inspector of plumbing, to fill the place of expert. 
The number of licenses granted will be found in the report of 
the inspector of buildings. 

Financial Statement for 1909. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation $8,000 00 

Receipts: — 

Milk fees 353 35 

Permit fees ....... 56 00 

Witness fees returned .... 6 15 

Sundry cities and towns, for care of dis- 
eases dangerous to public health . . 248 43 

Total credit $8,663 93 



296 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



DEBIT. 

Salaries 

Repairing and painting vehicles 
Repairing generator .... 
Repairing harnesses and new harness . 
Horseshoeing ..... 

Burying dead animals .... 
Office expenses, milk inspector 
Books, stationery, printing, and postage 
Bacteriological laboratory 
Board of agent's horse .... 

Telephones 

Care of diseases dangerous to public health 

(settlements in Somerville) . 
Incidentals 

Total debit 

Amount overdrawn 



$5,203 10 


83 60 


24 00 


68 20 


32 50 


103 75 


149 39 


289 53 


80 93 


312 30 


90 69 


5,143 09 


165 77 





$11,746 85 
$3,082 92 



Health Department, Collection of Ashes and Offal, 

CREDIT. 



Appropriation .... 
Sale of offal, rags, etc. . 
Received from Lord. & Webster (bill 
twice) 

Total credit .... 



DEBIT 



Salary of superintendent 

Collection of ashes . 

Collection of offal . 

Stable expenses 

Four new ash carts . 

Repairing wagons . 

Tools and repairing same 

Harnesses and repairing same 

Six new horses 

Horse doctoring 

Board of superintendent's horse 

Horseshoeing 

Hay and grain .... 

Incidentals .... 

Total debit 

Amount overdrawn 



paid 



$50,000 00 
8,649 76 

368 50 



$1,400 00 


29,440 20 


17,694 75 


2,186 00 


450 00 


911 52 


158 47 


809 33 


1,578 96 


150 18 


288 93 


938 39 


7,862 05 


222 47 



$59,018 26 



$64,091 25 
$5,072 99 



Health Department, Hospital for Contagious Diseases. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation $1,000 00 

Received from sundry persons, cities and 
towns, and commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts 6,781 71 



Total credit 



$7,781 71 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 297 

DEBIT. 

Salaries of employees . . . . . $5,300 80 

Supplies . . m . t 683 90 

Groceries and provisions . - . . . 1,981 49 

Incidentals 524 64 

Total debit $8,490 83 

Amount overdrawn .... $709 12 

Health Department, Hedical Inspection in the Public Schools. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation $1,500 00 

DEBIT. 

Salaries of inspectors $1,400 00 

Printing 27 45 

Total debit $1,427 45 

Balance unexpended . . . . $72 55 

Appropriations Overdrawn. 

Health Department $3,082 92 

Health Department, Collection of Ashes 

and Offal . . . _ . . . . 5,072 99 

Health Department, Hospital for Conta- 
gious Diseases 709 12 

Total overdrawn $8,865 03 

Balance unexpended, Health Depart- 
ment, Medical Inspection in Public 
Schools 72 55 

Net amount overdrawn .... $8,792 48 

Allen F. Carpenter, Chairman, 
Albert C. Aldrich, M. D., 
Zebelee E. Cliff, 

Board of Health. 



REPORT OF THE MEDICAL INSPECTOR. 



Somerville, January 10, 1910. 

To the Board of Health of the City of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present the report of the medical 
inspector for the year 1909, including the statistics of the con- 
tagious disease hospital and the bacteriological laboratory. 

Scarlet Fever. During the year 320 cases of this disease 
were reported in the city, an increase of thirty-seven in number 
over the previous year. Every case has been inspected, before 
the house was fumigated, and 348 visits were made at resi- 
dences to determine when desquamation was complete. 

Diphtheria. During the year 334 cases of diphtheria have 
been reported in the city, an increase from the previous year, 
when 278 cases were reported. The same restrictions are 
placed upon all cases, and before patients are released from 
quarantine two successive negative cultures must be obtained. 
It is optional with the attending physician to take the first 
culture, but the second must be taken by the medical inspector, 
and during the year 444 visits were made at houses for this pur- 
pose. 

Typhoid Fever. During the year ninety-nine cases of this 
disease were reported, an increase of thirty-five cases from the 
previous year. 

Tuberculosis. One hundred and forty-four cases of tuber- 
culosis were reported during the year, an increase of eight over 
the year previous. In November, 1906, following a conference 
with the overseers of the poor, these cases, which had been pre- 
viously cared for medically by the city physician, were trans- 
ferred to the board of health and the medical inspector in- 
structed to care for them. During 1909 288 visits have been 
made to thirty-nine patients. 

Contagious Disease Hospital. 

In September, 1906, following a change in the city charter, 
the city physician, who, up to this time, had treated the cases at 
the hospital, was relieved of this duty, and the care of the pa- 
tients transferred to the medical inspector on October 1. Dur- 
ing 1909 this arrangement has continued, 421 visits having been 
made at the hospital during the year. 

Scarlet Fever. During the year seventy-nine cases of 
scarlet fever were admitted, seven of which proved fatal. 
Thirty-five of these cases were among males, and fifty-two 



HEALTH DEPAKTMENT. 299 

among females. Twenty-three were under five years of age, 
thirty-five from five to ten years, and the remainder were over 
ten years. Vomiting was a constant symptom, it occurring in 
forty-eight cases, and a sore throat in sixty-six cases. In 
eleven cases the rash occurred on the first day of the illness, in 
fifty-five cases on the second day, and in eight instances on the 
third day. There was membrane present on the tonsils in 
thirty-three cases ; in thirteen cases the disease was complicated 
with nephritis ; in eleven cases with rheumatism, in six cases 
with discharging ears, in twenty-six with enlarged cervical 
glands, and in addition five had diphtheria, and one had mumps. 
The average stay in the hospital was forty-one days. 

Diphtheria. During the year 137 cases of diphtheria were 
admitted, nineteen of which proved fatal. Of these patients, 
seventy-one were among males, and seventy-three among 
females. Fifty-seven were under five years of age ; fifty-nine 
were from five to ten, and the remainder were over ten. Thir- 
teen entered the hospital on the first day of their illness, and all 
recovered. Sixty-nine entered the second day of the illness, 
and four died ; twenty-four on the third day, with five deaths ; 
sixteen on the fourth day, with six deaths ; four on the fifth day, 
with two deaths ; five on the sixth day, with one death, and three 
on the seventh day, with one death. The importance of early 
treatment with anti-toxin is thus very obvious. Of the laryn- 
geal cases eighteen came to intubation, thirteen of whom re- 
covered. In forty-two patients the membrane extended over 
both tonsils, uvula and palate, sixteen of whom died from sys- 
temic infection involving both the heart and kidneys. In 
fifty-eight cases the cultures were positive. The throat was 
clear of membrane in five cases on the first day, in twenty-two 
cases on the second, in eighteen cases on the third, in eleven 
cases on the fourth, in twenty cases on the fifth, in six on the 
sixth, and in six on the seventh. In fifty-seven patients erup- 
tions appeared on the body due to the use of the anti-toxin, and 
in five patients joint pains occurred from the same cause. The 
average stay in the hospital of 126 patients was twenty-two 
days. Of the nineteen deaths during the year four died within 
twenty-four hours of admission and were hopeless at that time, 
and were complicated with nephritis. 



300 



ANNUAL KEPOKTS. 



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Scarlet fever . . . 
Diphtheria . . . 
Erysipelas . . . 
Measles .... 




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Bateriological Department. 

During the year 1909, 1,537 examinations were made of 
cultures for the diphtheria organism, 192 examinations made 
of sputum from, patients suspected of having tuberculosis, and 
150 examinations to detect the Widal reaction in typhoid fever. 

Diphtheria. Fifteen hundred and thirty-seven cultures have 
been examined for diphtheria, 694 being in males, and 813 in 
females. Diphtheria being a disease of children, 375 of these 
examinations have been made in children under five years of 
age, 657 in those from five to ten years of age, 206 from ten to 
twenty, and 284 in adults over twenty years. In fifteen cases 
the age of the patient was not stated. Six hundred and thirty- 
seven examinations were made for the diagnosis of the case, 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 301 

189 proving positive, and 448 negative. Of the positive results, 
fifty-four were of eases in which the attending physician s diag- 
nosis of diphtheria was confirmed, eighteen in which the clinical 
diagnosis was not diphtheria, and 117 in which no definite diag- 
nosis was made. Of the 448 negative examinations, twenty- 
eight were obtained in which the clinical diagnosis was diph- 
theria, 121 in which the diagnosis was not diphtheria, and 299 in 
which no diagnosis had been made. 

Eight hundred and ninety-one cultures were taken for re- 
lease of patients from quarantine, 165 of which were positive, 
and 726 negative. The importance of taking release cultures is 
demonstrated by these figures, these patients showing the pres- 
ence of the bacilli in the throat after the clinical evidence of the 
disease had disappeared. In nine examinations there was no 
growth upon the serum tube. 

Tuberculosis. One hundred and ninety-two examinations 
have been made of sputum suspected of containing the tubercle 
bacillus, fourteen of which were positive and 178 negative. In 
seventy-nine cases a definite diagnosis of this disease had been 
made by the attending physician, but in sixty-nine of them 
the organism could not be detected. In the remainder of the 
cases, sixty-eight were stated as not showing evidence of the 
disease, three being positive, and in forty-five cases no state- 
ments were made giving information as to its character, one of 
which was positive. One hundred were males and ninety-two 
females. Although printed directions accompany each outfit, 
telling how the specimen should be obtained, it has not been un- 
usual for specimens to be sent to the laboratory containing 
only saliva from the mouth, with no excretion from the lungs or 
bronchial tubes. Physicians should be urged to give definite 
instructions to each patient, relating to the collection of the 
sputum, for in some instances a negative report would mislead 
both physician and patient. Consumption to-day is recognized 
as an infectious disease, and all persons afflicted with it should 
be instructed in the modern methods for preventing its spread. 
In some cases this is not done by the attending physician, and 
during the past six years your board has required that this dis- 
ease be reported to you, as other infectious diseases are, and that 
printed instructions and advice be sent to each patient ill with 
the disease. The decrease in the death rate of consumption, 
and the cure of persons afflicted with it, is due to the improved 
and intelligent manner with which cases are treated, and the 
prevention of further spread of the disease is a subject which is 
of importance to all local boards of health. 

Typhoid Fever. One hundred and fifty examinations of the 
blood of patients suspected of having typhoid fever have been 
made, fifty-two of which proved positive. In fifty-seven cases a 
positive diagnosis of this disease had been made by the attend- 



302 



AXXFAL KEFOETS. 



ing physician, in five cases it was stated not to be typhoid fever, 
and in the remainder no' statement was made relating to the 
diagnosis. Of the negative results, twenty-four were diagnosed 
as typhoid, five were said not to be typhoid, and in sixty-nine 
no diagnosis was made. Eighty-nine were males and sixty-one 
females. 



Summary for Seven Years, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908,1909. 



1903 
1904 

1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 



No. 



Examined 

. S17 
.1.429 
. 792 
. 90S 
. 971 
.1,293 
.1.53 1 



Males 

357 
629 
346 
407 
423 
542 
694 



Diphtheria Cultures. 



Females 

430 

soo 

446 
561 
548 

751 

843 



0^5 

282 

537 

204 
252 
224 
278 
375 



5-10 

199 
400 
260 
370 
346 
421 
657 



10-20 

125 
231 
139 
158 

1S5 
23S 
206 



Over 20 

185 
261 
170 
152 

210 

150 

284 



Age not No 
stated growth 



26 

34 

19 

6 

6 

6 

15 



5 

29 
4 
6 
3 
3 
9 



For Diagnosis Clinical Diagnosis Diph. Clin. Diag. not Diph. 
Positive Negative Positive Negative 

1903 360 56 35 11 122 

1904 406 72 37 11 96 

1905 263 15 23 10 76 

1906 419 55 60 14 130 

1907 462 45 34 10 104 

1908 524 57 48 14 96 

1909 637 54 28 18 121 

For Release 
Positive Negative 

1903 95 362 

1904 233 761 

1905 139 386 

1906 85 464 

1907 98 408 

1908 136 630 

1909 165 726 



Clin. Diag. 
Positive 

27 

59 
36 
47 
52 
92 
117 



not stated 
Negative 

109 
131 
103 
107 
217 
217 
299 



Sputum for Tuberculosis. 

Clin. Diag. Tuberculosis 
No. Examined Males Females Positive Negative Positive Negative 

1903 137 66 71 26 111 15 2i 

1904 124 54 70 28 96 14 29 

1905 162 69 93 22 140 11 38 

1906 175 95 80 9 166 7 44 

1907 227 100 127 7 220 4 79 

1908 173 84 89 14 159 9 59 

1909 192 100 92 14 178 10 69 

Clinical Diagnosis not Tuberculosis Clinical Diagnosis not stated 

Positive Negative Positive Negative 

1903 9 61 2 29 

1904 11 43 3 24 

1905 5 59 6 43 

1906 1 85 1 37 

1907 2 84 1 57 

190S 3 63 2 43 

1909 3 65 1 44 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



303 



Blood for Typhoid Fever. 

Clin Diag. Typhoid Fever 

No. Examined Males Females Positive Negative Positive Negative 

1903 72 39 33 27 45 18 7 

1904 76 53 23 32 44 18 4 

1905 78 45 33 26 50 11 1 

1906 94 57 37 24 70 14 15 

1907 110 58 52 45 65 25 10 

1908 110 59 51 31 79 20 14 

1909 150 89 61 52 98 33 24 

Clin. Diag. not Typhoid Fever Clin. Diag. not stated 

Positive Negative Positive Negative 

1903 2 6 7 32 

1904 6 14 34 

1905 1 5 14 44 

1906 8 10 47 

1907 3 20 52 

1908 6 11 59 

1909 5 19 69 

Respectfully submitted, 

i Frank L. Morse, 

Medical Inspector. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND PROVISIONS. 



Office of the Board of Health, City Hall, ) 
Somerville, Mass., January 1, 1910. \ 
To the Board of Health of the City of Somerville: — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit the report of the inspector 
of animals and provisions for the year 1909. 

The following' is a statement of the number of animals 
killed during the year at the five slaughtering establishments in 
the citv : — 

Swine, 1,128,246; sheep, 292,287; calves, 66,820; cattle, 
30,569 ; goats, 748. The work of the four large establishments 
in Somerville have been inspected by me as required by the law. 

Somerville is one of the largest quarantine stations for the 
export of animals in the United States, the number exported 
last year being: Cattle, 60,563; sheep, 22,662. 

The total number of neat cattle kept in the city is 163 ; 
swine, 110; cows, fifty-two ; goats, one, all of which have been 
inspected by me several times during the year. 

There have been 2.731 horses examined in stables where 
contagious diseases were reported to exist. Forty-three were 
quarantined, a decrease from last year of twenty. Of this num- 
ber, forty were killed and three were released. 

All the blacksmith shops of the city have been disinfected 
and whitewashed during the year. 

There are seventy-three barber shops and eighty-four 
bakeries in the city, all of which have been frequently inspected, 
most of them being found in excellent condition. 

There have been 2,581 visits made to stores and markets, 
and 816 pedlers' carts have been inspected from which fish, pro- 
visions, and produce were sold. 

The following articles have been condemned and de- 
stroyed : — 

Fish. 

Codfish, whole, 38; codfish, salt, % box; flounders, whole, 168; had- 
dock, whole, 334; halibut, 41 pounds; halibut, smoked, 3; herring, fresh, 
1,063; herring, smoked, 3 boxes; mackerel, whole, 105; pollock, whole, 
39; salmon, fresh, 41 pounds; salmon, smoked, 1; shad, whole," 33; 
smelts, 4 boxes; swordfish, 6 pounds; clams, 3 quarts; lobsters, 67; 
oysters, 6 gallons. 

Heats. 

Beef, fresh, 967 pounds; beef, corned, 571 pounds; Hamburg steak, 
22 pounds; livers, whole, 28; mutton, 171 pounds; pigs' feet, l 1 ! kegs; 
pork, fresh, 192 pounds; pork, salt, 149 pounds; pork, smoked, 126 
pounds; poultry, 943 pounds; sausage, fresh, 37 pounds; sausage, 
smoked, 29 pounds; swine, whole, 19; tripe, 26 pounds; veal, 212 
pounds. 



1 HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 305 

Fruit. 

Apples, 2 barrels; bananas, 114 dozen; cantaloupes, 16 crates; dates, 
V2 box; grape fruit, 2 boxes; grapes, 34 baskets; lemons, 2 boxes; 
oranges, 5 boxes; peaches, 6 baskets; prunes, 1 basket; blackberries, 11 
quarts; raspberries, 42 cups; strawberries, 61 quarts. 

Vegetables. 

Beans, green, 2 bushels, 4 crates; beets, 4 bushels; cabbage, 7 bar- 
rels; carrots, 3 bushels; cauliflower, 18 head; celery, 35 bunches; cucum- 
bers, 11 crates; greens, 21 bushels; lettuce, 108 head; onions, 3% bushels; 
potatoes, white, 14 bushels; potatoes, sweet, 5 crates; squash, 10 barrels; 
tomatoes, 1 bushel; turnips, 15 barrels. 

I have performed all other duties as required by your 
board. Respectfully submitted, 

Dr. Charles M. Berry, 

Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HILK INSPECTION. 



Office of the Inspector of Miek, ) 
310 Broadway, Somerville, January 1, 1910. ) 

To the Board of Health of the City of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen. — I have the lienor to present the report of this 
department for the year ending December 31, 1909. Owing to 
the death of Dr. J, E. Richardson, who so ably conducted this 
office for the past nine years, my report will be of necessity 
somewhat restricted as to detail of work, statistics, etc., but will 
be confined to recommendations as to the care and handling of 
milk, and the observance of the statute and board of health 
regulations now in force. During the eight weeks I have been 
in office I have examined two hundred forty-nine samples of 
milk microscopically and chemically. In all but fourteen 
samples I found the milk of good standard quality. Notices and 
warnings were sent to these parties. 

One hundred and four licenses have been issued to milk- 
men to sell milk. 

Five hundred and seventy-five licenses have been issued to 
storekeepers, making a total of six hundred and seventy-nine 
merchants handling milk in this city during the vear 1909. In 
addition, forty-three grocers' teams have been licensed to de- 
liver milk to their customers. 

Milk. 

Few people realize the true food value of pure milk, other- 
wise the care used in handling this valuable article of food, both 
before and after it comes into the home, would be doubled. 

The elements needed to nourish the body may be obtained 
from pure milk more cheaply than from meat, and will replace 
or diminish the quantity of other foods. 

Pure milk needs no cooking, pasteurizing or sterilizing, 
contains no waste, is palatable and easily digested, but no other 
article of food is more dangerous to health than milk if adulter- 
ated or carelessly handled. An eminent authority states ''that 
one-half the children born into this world die before the age 
of five years, and one-fifth die before the end of the first year.''' 
He goes further and states "that bad milk kills more babies than 
any other one of their enemies." 

Care of Milk. 

In pursuance of the above thought and in view of our 
knowledge of diseases contracted from contaminated milk it 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 307 

would be well to recommend the following- simple rules to be 
observed in the homes : — 

1. Do not patronize a milk dealer at any price whose milk 
after standing for two hours reveals a visible sediment at the 
bottom of the bottle. 

It is evidence of dirty habits, extremely suggestive of dan- 
ger, and entirely preventable by clean, decent methods without 
greatly increasing the cost. 

2. Subject your milk to low pasteurization (140 degrees 
Fahrenheit for twenty minutes) and after cooling keep it at a 
temperature below fifty degrees Fahrenheit. 

This will not make bad milk good, but it will destroy germ 
life and reduce the danger of milk-borne disease to a minimum. 

It has been conclusively shown that low pasteurization 
when done properly does not impair the enzymes or ferments 
contained in fresh milk, does not alter the chemical composition, 
does not lessen its food value, either as to nutrition or digesti- 
bility, and does not alter its taste or physical qualities. 

If at any time you have trouble with the milk, notify the 
milk inspector and he will investigate to the best of his ability. 

Bottles. 

There seems to be very little violation of the regulation 
prohibiting the use of milk bottles as containers for substances 
other than milk, the public being the principal offenders, as they 
do not realize the danger in using milk bottles for molasses, 
vinegar, and kerosene. The daily collection of bottles by milk- 
men would assist in enforcing this regulation. 

Where there is a case of infectious disease the bottles 
should not be collected by the milkman. The consumer 
should leave some suitable container ready for the milkman in 
which to pour the milk. If by any chance milk bottles have ac- 
cumulated during a sickness, they should be sterilized or fumi- 
gated before they are returned to the milkman. I mention these 
points, as it is often dark when the milk is left and the card 
might not be noticed. 

Milkmen. 

Almost without exception the milkmen have been most 
courteous and shown a desire to co-operate in every way pos- 
sible. Carelessness, I think, rather than intentional wrong-do- 
ing is responsible for the majority of cases of dirty milk. 

In one instance a milkman was discovered tasting milk 
with the same spoon, without washing it in the intervals, and in 
another case there were several teaspoonfuls of soapy water in 
each bottle, waiting to receive the daily supply of milk. 

Occasionally some dairyman will send milk into the city 
from cows with infected udders, and storekeepers in the small 



308 ' ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

stores are careless about, icing. I call attention to these in- 
stances to show that eternal vigilance is the price of safety and 
applies especially to the milk problem. The following rules 
were posted in all barns where cows were kept and a license 
granted to sell milk by Dr. J. E. Richardson : — 

The board of health issues the following suggestions to milk pro- 
ducers in the interest of cleaner and purer milk: — 

1. Keep cows clean. 

2. Keep floors, walls, and ceilings of stable and milk room clean 
and free from cobwebs. Whitewash frequently. 

3. Use clean bedding, and never use manure for that purpose. 

4. Air the cow stable frequently. 

5. Permit no sick person to handle the cows or milk, but have 
the sick person examined at once by a physician. Avoid exposure to 
contagious diseases. 

6. Clean and wipe udders dry before each milking. 

7. Wash and dry your hands before milking; always milk dry 
handed. 

8. Wear clean outer garments when milking. 

9. Do not save milk from any cows which have any disease, par- 
ticularly of the udder. 

10. The first stream of milk from each teat should be thrown away. 

11. Do not strain milk in cow barn. 

12. Remove milk from barn to milk room at once, strain and cool 
to fifty degrees Fahrenheit or lower, and keep it there; get a dairy 
thermometer (twenty-five cents) to try temperature. 

13. Protect milk from flies and dust at all times; screen doors and 
windows of milk room; if trough is used, cover with screen of coarse 
cheesecloth, tacked to light frame. 

14. All milk vessels should be thoroughly cleaned and then rinsed 
with boiling water. 

15. Use milk pails with small opening on top. Don't use wooden 
pails. 

16. Don't feed any food which imparts flavor to milk before milk- 
ing, always after. 

17. See that milk cans are clean and well aired. 

Observance of these suggestions will be for your advantage, and of 
great advantage to the consumer of milk. 

Signed, 

J. E. Richardson, 

Inspector of Milk. 

I consider it absolutely necessary to live up to these regu- 
lations. 

Oleomargarine. 

Five persons have been licensed to sell oleomargarine in 
Somerville during the year, and I believe they all observe the 
law which requires each package to be plainly stamped with the 
weight and the word "Oleomargarine." 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 309 

Vinegar. 

From time to time during the year vinegar samples were 
seized from grocery stores and analyzed. 

According to the records in this office, all samples were 
found to be above the standard required by law. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Herbert E. Bowman, 
Inspector of Milk and Vinegar. 



SUPPORT OF POOR DEPARTMENT. 



Board of Overseers of the Poor. 

Edward B. West, President. 
Albert W. Edmands, Vice-President. 
Herbert E. Merrill. 



Committees. 

On Finance, Investigation and Relief, and City Home— Mr. West, 
Mr. Edmands and Mr. Merrill. 

Secretary. 

Cora F. Lewis. 

General Agent. 

Charles C. Folsom. 

City Physician. 

C. Clarke Towle, M. D. 

Warden and Matron, City Home. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Foster Colquhoun. 

Office. 

City Hall Annex, Highland Avenue. 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Somerville. Mass., December 31, 1909. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, aix 1 the Board of Aldermen of the 

City of Somerville: — 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with our usual custom and the 
requirements of the law, we submit our annual report for the 
year 1909. 

We have passed out of the financial depression of two 
years ago, and many of our families, which we assisted in their 
homes, are working and do not require aid. 

The laundry machinery which has been put in at the city 
home has long been needed and we appreciate the courtesy of 
the mayor and commissioner of public buildings in having the 
same installed. 

We are in need of a hospital in connection with the city 
home, where we can take care of the sick at the home and 
others whom we have to care for and who cannot be admitted 
to the Somerville hospital, and we hope you will be able to give 
us this addition. 

The state has taken part of our land for the Alewife Brook 
boulevard and there ought to be a fence built from Broadway 
between the city land and said boulevard ; this should be done 
early this spring. 

We wish to thank the general agent, the secretary, the 
warden, and matron for the work accomplished in their re- 
spective positions. 

The work of the year has been entirely satisfactory in the 
different departments, and we submit the details as follows, in- 
cluding the reports of the general agent and warden. 
Signed, 

E. B. West, ) Overseers 

A. W. Edmands, > of the 
H, E. Merrill, ) Poor. 



REPORT OF GENERAL AC1ENT. 



Somerville, Mass., December 31, 1909. 

To the Board of Overseers of the Poor, Somerville, Mass. : — 

Gentlemen, — The following is the general agent's report 
for the year just closed. Owing to the fact that the state has 
paid for the support of the feeble-minded and insane epileptics, 
and for some other reasons, there is a balance of $785.93 to 
our credit at the close of the year. The amount expended for 
food for poor families has been $4,459.58, and for fuel $588.01, 
or about eighty tons of coal. These combined figures show a 
decrease from 1908 of $752.64. We have paid other cities and 
towns for aid rendered to the poor living there, who have a set- 
tlement in Somerville, $3,086.71. In addition to the $5,000.00 
appropriated by the city for the support and treatment of the 
sick poor, who are settled here, we have caused to be collected 
and turned over to the Somerville Hospital the sum of $2,250.11. 
There has been established at Canton, Mass., the Massachusetts 
hospital school for crippled and deformed children. The law 
establishing the same reads as follows: 'The board of such 
children as have a legal settlement in some city or town shall 
be paid by such city or town at a rate not exceeding four dol- 
lars a week, notice of the reception of the children by the 
trustees being given by them to the overseers of the poor of the 
city or town of settlement as soon as is practicable. . . . Such 
charges as are paid by the commonwealth, or by any city or 
town, shall not be deemed to have been paid as state or pauper 
aid, and no person shall be deemed to be a pauper in conse- 
quence of his inability to pay for the support of a child in said 
school." 

Although the law requires that the overseers of the poor 
shall be notified, yet I do not think that the money to pay these 
bills should be taken from our appropriation, for the reason that 
we are a pauper department and when we pay for the board of 
a child it pauperizes the family. I think the law should either 
be amended or the money for their board should come from 
some other department. We have one child in this hospital 
school and we are likely to have others. A special appropria- 
tion could be made by the mayor and aldermen for this purpose. 
We have caused to be collected during the year from other 
cities, towns, state, and individuals, the sum of $1,129.10 ; this 
amount includes the $2,250.11 turned over to the hospital. We 
have given sixteen permits to the city home and eleven to State 
Infirmary at Tewksbury during the year. With the consent of 
the board our old typewriter has been exchanged for a new one 
at an expense of $95.25. A new carpet for the offices has been 



SUPPORT OF POOR DEPARTMENT. 313 

purchased with the approval of the board costing $99.75. I 
have tried to keep in touch with the needs of those dependent 
upon the city for aid, and so far as I am aware their wants have 
been attended to promptly. I wish to thank the members of the 
board for their courtesies and co-operation in the work. The 
usual tables giving- a more detailed account of what has been 
done are annexed. 

Very respectfully, 

C. C. Folsom, 

General Agent. 



314 



ANNUAL EEPOETS. 



Table No. 1. 

FULL SUPPORT (DURING THE YEAR). 

In city home (men 29, women 15) .... 

In city home December 31, 1909 (men 19, women 9) 

In private families 

In Somerville hospital 

In hospitals for the sick in other towns, cities and state 
In hospital for dipsomaniacs 

Table No. 2. 

PARTIAL SUPPORT (OUTDOOR RELIEF). 

Families 

Persons aided (not including hospital cases) 

Burials 

Permits to Tewksbury almshouse 

Average expense to the city for each (ambulance for two) 

Table No. 3. 

REIHBURSEMENTS. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

City of Boston 

" " Cambridge 

" " Chelsea 

" " Everett 

" " Fall River 

" " Gloucester 

" " Haverhill 

" " Holvoke 

" " Lowell 

" " Maiden 

" " Marlboro 

" " Medford 

" " New Bedfo 

" " Newton 

" " Quincy 

" " Springfield 

" " Taunton 

" " Woburn 

" " Worcester 
Town of Andover 

u " Arlington 

" " Attleboro 

" " Bovlston . 

" " Braintree . 

" " Brookline 

" " Framinsrham 

tt " Gardner . 
" " Leominster 

" " Reading . 

u " Revere 

" " Saugus 

" " Stoneham 

" " Stow . 

" " Truro 

" " Wakefield 

" " Weston . 

" " Williamstown 
Relatives, individuals, etc 



44 

28 

2 

22ti 

49 

2 



203 
892 

9 
15 

$1.92 



$95S 93 


606 08 


643 77 


105 50 


115 89 


22 65 


40 00 


31 43 


24 00 


156 24 


PS 85 


55 71 


96 15 


10 85 


238 64 


13 00 


18 90 


18 00 


66 44 


132 44 


10 00 


102 S6 


18 14 


32 43 


29 14 


11 43 


12 43 


8 57 


. 52 17 


18 00 


34 00 


28 01 


39 45 


28 71 


36 86 


16 16 


32 00 


14 29 


150 98 



$4,129 10 



SUPPORT OF POOR DEPARTMENT. 



315 



Table No. 4. 

SOMERVILLE HOSPITAL (PATIENTS ON CITY BEDS). 

Patients having settlement in Somerville .... 92 

Patients having settlement in other cities or towns . . 59 

Patients having no settlement (chargeable to state) . . 75 

Total number of patients sent to hospital .... 226 
Money paid hospital by the city for patients settled in 

Somerville . ....... $5,000 00 

Amount reimbursed to the city and paid to the hospital 

for patients not settled in Somerville . . . 2,250 11 



Total paid to the hospital 



$7,250 11 



Table No. 5. 

POPULATION AND GROSS EXPENDITURES, 1883 TO 1909, INCLUSIVE. 



Year. 

1883 
1884 
1885 
1880 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1890 
1897 
1898 
1899 

1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1900 
1907 
1908 
1909 



Population 
(Estimated). 

27,000 

28,000 
*29,992 

32,000 

34,000 

30,000 

39,000 
*40,117 

43,000 

40,000 

48,000 

50,000 
*52,200 

54,000 

56,000 

57,500 

60,000 

*61,643 
02,500 
03,500 
05,500 
09,500 

*09,272 
72,000 
74,000 
75,500 
75,500 



Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 



$23,097.02 

5,528.83 
$29,171.15 

0,022.43 
$28,007.04 

7,390.04 
$30,470.20 

7,548.39 
$20,470.54 

0,503.11 
$17,527.88 

7,474.30 
$18,237.53 

0,800.79 
$17,852.20 

7,001.23 
$17,955.34 

0,875.50 
$10,843.17 

7,502.83 



Expenditures. 

$15,959.80 
17,272.52 
1G,430.32 
14,341.83 
13,430.89 
13,375.98 
14,010.92 
15,201.14 
15,980.49 
17,015.30 
17,799.58 
19,733.13 
20,755.40 
21,999.79 
25,081.47 
28,522.21 
28,924.39 

I 29,220.45 

I 35,793.58 

| 30,003.08 

I 38,018.59 

I 27,039.05 



53 ) 

79 \ 



25,002.24 
25,044.32 
24,853.43 
24,830.90 
24,400.00 



*Census, 



316 



ANNUAL REPOKTS. 



Overseers of the Poor of Somerville. 

SINCE THE REORGANIZATION IN 1885. 



tHon. Mark F. Burns, chairman ex-officio . 

tColonel Herbert E. Hill ..... 

tCharles S. Lincoln, Esq., chairman 

Hon. Edward Glines . 

tCharles G. Brett (president 1888-1892) 

Edward B. West (president May, 1894, to 
date) . . . . . 

tDaniel C. Stillson 

tHon. Charles G. Pope, chairman ex-officio . 

Nathan H. Reed (president 1893 to April, 
1894) ........ 

tHon. William H. Hodgkins, chairman ex- 
officio 

James G. Hinckley May 

Albert W. Edmands May 

Herbert E. Merrill May 

tEzra D. Souther 

Hon. Albion A. Perry, chairman ex-officio . 

James H. Butler March 

Hon. George O. Proctor, chairman ex-officio, 



1885 1888 inclusive 

1885 1889 

1885 * 1887 

1885 1887 

1885 April 1893 

1888 to date* 

1888 April 1892 

1889 1891 

1890 April 1894 

1892 1895 

1892 1894 

1893 to date* 

1894 to date* 

1895 Feb. 1898 (Died) 

1896 1898 inclusive 
1898 1899 

1899 



* Present member, 
t Deceased. 



Table No. 7. 

RECAPITULATION (HISCELLANEOUS). 

Appropriation $13,500 00 

Reimbursements 4,129 10 

Total receipts $17,629 10 

Total expenditures 16,843 17 

Balance $785 93 

Net expenditures , $12,714 07 



Table No. 6. 

EXPENDITURES, IN DETAIL, FOR THE YEAR 1909. 



1909. 



January . 
February- 
March 
April . 
May . 
June . 
July . 
August 
September 
October . 
November 
December 



Totals . 



Medicine. 



$15.50 
14.75 
10.25 
23.48 

7.70 
18.80 

7.15 
38.70 
37.25 
13.05 
15.40 



2.03 



Board. 



$31.01 
24.00 
52.51 
38.44 
44.08 
36.44 
37.65 
37.65 
40.72 
47.65 
50.73 
52.08 



$492.96 



Groceries. 



$747.33 
481.50 
413.50 
339.00 
241.00 
349.50 
284.00 
365.50 
409.00 
299.50 
350.00 
179.75 



$4,459.58 



Somerville 

Poor in 

Other Cities 

and Towns. 



$608.03 

49.57 

179.49 

257.15 

2l'.91 
383.94 
405.36 
135.59 
560.44 
214.29 
270.94 



5,086.71 



Boots 

and 

Shoes. 



$11.00 



25 



50 



$21.75 



Dry 
Goods. 



$7.00 



2.00 



1.00 



Burials. 



$35.00 
35.00 

15.00 
15.00 

25.00 

30.'o6 



$155.00 



Salaries. 



$356.66 
337.99 
316.66 
328.66 
316.66 
316.66 
316.66 
316.66 
343.33 
316.66 
316.66 
336.74 



$3,920.00 



Fuel. 



$172.69 

100.11 

93.80 

' 2M 
3.30 



1.95 

139.'91 

73.80 



$588.01 



Sundries. 



$4.00 

' 2. 00 
4.00 



1.00 
6.40 

119.'75 

99!75 



$236.90 



Cash 
Paid 
Out. 



£23. 70 

12.35 

13.15 

8.06 

7.35 

6.25 

33.99 

22.75 

11.20 

8.70 

28.25 

17.35 



$193.10 



Telephone. 


Stationery 

and 
Printing. 


$7.00 
23.90 


$26.00 


.60 


18.00 


30.55 


3.50 


... 


4.30 


... 


6.25 


30.87 


4.85 


. . . 


6.25 




'i.oo 


10.19 


■ • • 


10.16 


. . . 


$113.27 


$76.15 



Somerville 
Hospital. 



$533.32 
133.33 
133.33 
133.33 
133.33 
133.33 
133.33 
133.33 
783.48 



$2,250.11 



State 
Hospital. 



24 



123 
3 

99 



71 

75 

88 
87 

43 



$341.64 



Foxboro 

State 
Hospital. 



$15-: 



29 



11 



21 



71 



29 



$194.21 



Feeble- 
minded 
School. 



$253.50 



$253.50 



Epileptic 
Hospital 

and 
Nursing. 



$29.25 



13.00 
10.25 

35.'75 

15.25 

33.00 

112.75 



$249.25 



Total. 



$2,263.42 
1,168.88 
1,317.42 
1,566.16 
796.62 
923.69 
1,273.40 
1,481.48 
1,151.99 
1,528.83 
1,432.48 
1,938.80 

$16,843.17 



REPORT OF WARDEN OF CITY HOng. 



City Home, January 1, 1910. 
To the Overseers of the Poor, Somerville, Mass. : — 

Gentlemen, — I submit the following as the report of the 
warden of the city home for the year ending - December 31, 
1909 :— 

Table No. 1. 

REinBURSEMENTS. 



Produce and pork sold . 
Board of sundry persons 



Table No. 2. 

LIVING EXPENSES. 



General repairs 

Salaries and wages . 

Groceries and provisions 

Dry goods 

Boots and shoes 

Hay and grain 

Seeds and fertilizer 

House furnishings . 

Kitchen furnishings 

Sundries 

Farm sundries 

Cash paid by warden, car fares fo 

inmates, and laborers 
Medicines 
Shoeing horses 
Repairs on wagons and tools 
Repairs on sash 
Swill and bedding 
New tools 
Live stock 
Telephone 
Ice 

Credits: — 
Produce and pork sold . 
Board of sundry persons 



r wa 



rden 



Net living expenses 



Table No. 3. 

Number of weeks' board of inmates 
Number of males admitted during 1909 
Number of females admitted during 1909 
Number of males discharged during 1909 
Number of females discharged during 1909 
Number of males supported during 1909 
Number of females supported during 1909 
Number of males died during 1909 
Number of females died during 1909 
Number of inmates in home December 31, 
1909 . 



$4,219 65 
808 10 



$59 72 


2,649 19 


2,050 24 


188 61 


62 80 


587 43 


141 16 


3 60 


54 75 


114 97 


258 67 


61 28 


103 49 


36 75 


86 39 


11 68 


309 50 


78 47 


61 50 


42 69 


26 00 



4,219 65 

808 10 



11 

4 
6 
4 
26 
17 
4 
4 

28 



$5,027 75 



$6,988 89 



5,027 75 
$1,961 14 



5-7 



318 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table No. 4. 

FARH ACCOUNT. 
RElMBURSEflENTS. 



Produce and pork sold 
Produce used at city home 



Wages for help 

Feed for one horse 

Shoeing one horse 

Repairs on wagon and tools 

Repairs on sash 

Swill and bedding 

Farm sundries 

Seed and fertilizers 

Live stock 

New tools 



. 






$4,219 65 


. 


325 00 


EXPENSES. 






$1,005 38 








146 86 








12 25 








86 39 








11 68 








309 50 








258 67 








141 16 








61 50 








78 47 



Balance 



PERHANENT 

New laundry machinery 
Removing and rebuilding: — 
Hen house 
Barn floor 

Chimney for greenhouse 
New pens in piggery 
New door for ash pit 



Table No. 5. 

REPAIRS AND 



FIXTURES. 

$500 00 

32 01 

7 83 

2 84 

24 21 

7 05 



Living expenses 
Total expenditures 



Appropriation 
Reimbursements 
Net expenditures 

Total receipts . 
Total expenditures 

Balance 



Table No. 6, 



$4,544 65 



$2,111 86 
$2,432 79 



$573 94 
6,988 89 



$7,562 83 



$3,000 00 

5,027 75 

.... 2,535 08 

$8,027 75 

7,562 83 

. . . $464 92 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. Foster Colquhoun, 

Warden. 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



Office of the City Physician, ) 
Somerville, January 1, 1910. ( 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: — 

Gentlemen, — The following summary is presented as rep- 
resenting the work of your city physician during the year 
1909:— 

Office consultations and treatments 617 

Total outside visits 1,309 

Vaccinations 169 

Confinements 25 

Examinations for legal department 12 

Visits at city home 34 

Attended at police station 41 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. Clarke Towle, 

City Physician. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of the City Engineer, ") 

City Hall, Somerville, January 20, 1910. ) 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with the provisions of the city 
charter, the following report of the work done and expense in- 
curred for the year ending December 31, 1909, by the depart- 
ments and appropriations under my charge and supervision, in- 
cluding Engineering, Grade Crossings, Sewers Construction, 
Sewers Maintenance, Public Grounds, and other public works, 
is herewith presented. 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Statement of Expenses, 1909. 

Salary of City Engineer . r . . $3,000 00 

Salaries of assistants (see itemized state- 
ment following) 8,455 19 

Stakes, tools, and general supplies (outside 

work) . 50 31 

Draughting materials and office supplies 

(inside work) 172 13 

Car fares ........ 268 63 

Maintenance of team . . . . . 244 25 

Telephone, postage, expressing, and inci- 
dentals 128 63 

Total debit $12,319 14 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation $11,500 00 

Amount received for making acceptance 

plans , m 25 00 

Amount received from other departments, 

services rendered 825 00 

Total credit $12,350 00 

Balance unexpended ....... $30 86 

Classification of Expenses, Assistants' Salaries. . 

Sewers, — comprising surveys, estimates, profiles, lines, 
grades, titles, plans, assessments, and all engineer- 
ing work relating to sewers $1,285 99 

Highways, — comprising plans, estimates, titles, profiles, 
lines and grades, inspection of paving, and all other 
engineering relating to the department . . . 1,377 13 

Sidewalks, — comprising profiles, lines, grades, measure- 
ments, titles, costs, and assessments . . . 917 43 



CITY ENGINEEB. 321 

Bridges and Grade Crossings,— comprising surveys, plans, 
profiles, estimates, lines and grades, etc. 

Water Works, — comprising lines, grades, locations of 
mains, gates, hydrants, and services, and other mat- 
ters relating to the department .... 

Public Grounds, — comprising surveys, plans, estimates, 
profiles and grades, including laying out of parks 
and grounds and boulevards 

Public Buildings, — comprising surveys, estimates, lines 
and grades, and other work relating to construction 

Street Numbering, — comprising locations of buildings, 
plans, and affixing street numbers on houses . 

Street Lines and Grades, — comprising establishing of 
lines, grades, and miscellaneous data given parties 
for building and grading 

City Survey, — comprising establishing of street lines, ac- 
ceptance plans, and miscellaneous survey work for 
city map, etc. 

Middlesex Registry, — comprising copying of plans and ab- 
stracts from deeds and examination of titles filed at 
East Cambridge, also tracings of street acceptance 
and sewer taking plans filed for record . . . 294 13 

Railway, Telephone, Electric Light, and Gas Light Com- 
panies, — comprising grades, plans, profiles, and 
office notes, locations of poles and conduits . . 290 59 

Stone Bounds, — locating and setting 29 85 

Office Work, — comprising records of all locations, index- 
ing, typewriting, calculations, and general draught- 
ing . . . . . 841 40 

Miscellaneous Work, — comprising preliminary surveys, 
designs, sketches, etc., relating to various schemes 
for different committees 43 42 

Vacations, Holidays, and Sickness ..... 644 99 



CREDIT. 

Received from City Solicitor, part counsel 

, fees $577 50 

Received from Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, apportionment of damages, 
decree of court 46,460 03 

Received from Boston Elevated Railway, 

decree of court 7,009 42 

Received from Boston & Maine Railroad 

Co., decree of auditor .... 32,351 17 

Received from New York Central & Hud- 
son River Railroad, decree of auditor, 2,695 93 



299 90 


540 07 


309 37 


64 59 


320 17 


192 78 


1,003 38 



Total ........... $8,455 19 

Grade Crossings Account. 

STATEMENT OF EXPENSES, 1909. 

Account overdrawn, 1908 .... $32,879 52 
Extra legal services (City Solicitor) . . 1,184 09 

Damages paid for land and buildings taken 64,397 98 

Photographs 9 00 

■ $98,470 59 



$89,094 05 



Overdrawn, 1909 $9 >376 54 



o22 . AXXUAL REPORTS. 

Office Records and Value of Instruments. 

Number of survey note-books, sewer permit books, deed 
books, calculation books, and record books, — three 
hundred and twenty. 

Number of plans, including sewers, highways, parks, 
house lots, etc., — six thousand four hundred. 

Value of field instruments, tools, and office instruments, — $2,500 

The number of assistants employed during the year on en- 
gineering work varied from seven to twelve. 

General Work. A varied line of city work is carried on 
each year under the Engineering department, including the de- 
signing and superintending of the construction and mainte- 
nance of sewers, parks, playgrounds, boulevards, bridges, and 
other public works as may be authorized ; the making of such 
surveys, plans, estimates, descriptions and specifications, and 
contracts for work as the mayor, board of aldermen, or any 
committee or department may require ; the custody of all plans 
and profiles ; and all data relating to the laying out, widening, 
or discontinuing of streets, and the engineering work for all 
departments of the city. 

The city ordinances require that the city engineer must be 
consulted on all work where the advice of a civil engineer 
would be of service ; and no structure of any kind can be placed 
upon, beneath, or above any street by any department of the 
city, corporation, or individual, until a plan is furnished show- 
ing the location, and approved by him. 

During the year 1909 there has been undertaken and com- 
pleted a larger amount of permanent improvement in the city's 
main thoroughfares than during any previous year. 

Considerable of the engineering work is so closely allied 
with work in the Highway department that it is carried on in 
conjunction with it, and the final cost of completed work made 
up and betterment assessments computed, showing the amount 
assessed on the various property owners. 

Highland avenue has been constructed its entire length, 
8,870 feet, with a combination pavement, consisting of a Port- 
land cement concrete base five inches in thickness and a bitu- 
minous wearing surface three inches in thickness. 

The excavation, concrete base, grouted granite block 
centre and brow-stone along the car track were done bv con- 
tract, and the remainder of the work by the city (day labor). 

The electric railroad tracks were re-laid by the company 



CITY ENGINEER. 323 

at their expense, with new rails and ties bedded in concrete, and 
the granite block pavement, between tracks, grouted with 
cement. 

Itemized cost to city, Highland-avenue pavement, 1909 : — 

Contract work, Simpson Brothers Corporation: — 

Excavation and removal of material, fur- 
nishing materials, and laying five-inch 
concrete foundation (25,069.4 square 
yards) ....... $23,815 93 

Furnishing and laying granite block 

brow-stone (17,642.5 linear feet) . 5,733 81 

Re-laying granite block paving between 

car tracks (4,565.9 square yards) . 3,196 13 

Extra excavation and teaming . . . 200 32 

Cost of work done by contract $32,946 19 

City, Highway Department:— 

Day labor $5,025 06 

Teaming 739 90 

Rollers 1,910 48 

"Tarvia" used (91,814 gallons) . . . 5,993 01 

Stone used (5,175 tons) .... 6,351 36 
Re-setting edgestones, re-laying cross- 
ings, changing catch basins, manholes, 

water pipes, inspection of work, etc., 2,836 77 

Cost of work done by city (day labor) .... $22,856 58 

Total cost of work $55,802 77 

CREDIT. 

By old granite gutter paving $5,937 22 

Net cost of pavement to city $49,865 55 

Average cost, $1.81 per square yard, for combination pavement, 
bituminous wearing surface laid on a concrete base. 

Washington street, on the southerly side, between the Bos- 
ton city line and opposite Tufts street, a length of 1,813 feet, 
has been paved with granite blocks, averaging four and one- 
half inches in depth, grouted with pebbles and cement, laid with 
a sand and cement cushion one inch in thickness, on a Portland 
cement concrete base four inches in thickness. 

This pavement was laid by contract at the following cost : — 

Fred S. & A. D. Gore Corporation: — 
Laying 4,292.4 square yards granite block 

paving, concrete base .... $12,520 88 
Extra work and materials, re-setting 

edgestone, re-paving driveways, etc., 314 10 

Cost of work done by contract $12,834 98 

City, — labor, inspection, catch basin changes, etc. . . 165 22 

Total cost of work $13,000 20 



324 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

CREDIT. 

By old granite gutter paving $881 00 



Net cost of pavement to city $12,119 20 

- Average cost, $2.96 per square yard for cement-grouted granite 
block pavement laid on concrete base. 

Medford street, between Somerville avenue and Washing- 
ton street, a length of 98.2 feet, has been paved with granite 
blocks, grouted with pebbles and "tarvia," the work being done 
by the Highway department, day labor. 

The old granite gutter blocks and car track paving on the 
street were used with new granite blocks to complete the work, 
at the following cost : — 

City, Highway Department (day labor) : — 
Laying 2,547.3 square yards granite block 
pavement: — 
Labor, teaming, rolling .... $2,455 23 

Paving blocks (37,970) .... 2,278 20 

"Tarvia" used (7,974 gallons) ... 528 24 

Pebbles used (200 tons) .... 254 55 

Changing catch basins, manholes, etc., 54 23 



Total cost of work $5,570 45 

CREDIT. 

By old gutter paving . . $170 87 



Net cost of pavement to city $5,399 58 

Average cost, $2.19 per square yard for "tarvia"-grouted granite 
block pavement. 

Broadway, on the northeasterly side, between Cross street 
and Fellsway east, a length of 690 feet, has been constructed 
with trap-rock, using "tarvia" for a binder, the work being done 
by the Highway department, day labor, at the following cost : — 

City, Highway Department (day labor): — 
Constructing 2,950 square yards pave- 
ment: — 
Labor, teaming, rolling .... $1,085 19 
Stone used (768 tons) .... 1,104 06 
"Tarvia" used (9,562 gallons) . . 629 30 
Changing catch basins and miscella- 
neous work 67 82 



Total cost of work $2,886 37 

Average cost, $0.98 per square yard for street construction with 
bituminous wearing surface. 

Beacon street, extending from the Cambridge city line to 
Buckingham street, a length of 870 feet, has been improved, 
using the same form of construction as described on Broadway, 
amounting to 2,G10 square yards of pavement. 



CITY ENGINEER. 325 

The foregoing descriptions and itemized statements of cost 
for compaiison represent four different types of pavement, laid 
in the city's main thoroughfares during the year 1909. 

The total length of permanent paved streets in the city 
amounts to 8.33 miles. 

Three new streets have been constructed during the year, 
with a "tarviated" trap-rock surface, a length of 2,782 feet 
(0.50 mile), costing $5,735.93, where betterment assessments 
have been levied on the abutting property amounting to 
$3,363.01 ; the average cost of this construction being $0.78 per 
square yard. 

Two streets have been partially constructed, a length of 
1,120 feet. 

Eight streets have been re-macadamized or re-surfaced, a 
length of 7,548 feet (1.24 miles). 

Lines and grades have been given for setting 14,194.2 
linear feet (2.69 miles) of new edgestone, and the re-setting of 
5,015.5 feet (0.95 mile) of old edgestone, and measurements 
taken for computing assessments. 

2,396.6 square yards of new brick sidewalks and 5,390 
square yards of granolithic and tar concrete sidewalks, includ- 
ing sidewalks laid by private parties, have been laid (2.24 miles 
ill length), and 1,436.3 square vards of old brick sidewalks re- 
laid. 

The average cost for the year of setting edgestone with 
gravel sidewalk has been $1.01 per linear foot; for laying brick 
sidewalks, $1.14 per square yard ; and granolithic sidewalks, 
$1.60 per square yard. 

. 4,731.4 square yards of new paved gutters have been laid, 
and 426.9 square yards of new vitrified brick and granite cross- 
ings and driveways constructed ; 950.4 square yards of old 
gutters, driveways, and crossings have been re-laid, all requir- 
ing lines, grades, and measurements. (See tables in this report 
for cost of new work, 1909, and total lengths of sidewalks and 
streets constructed in the city to date.) 

A considerable quantity of stone still remains on the two 
parcels of ledge property owned by the city, situated in West 
Somerville, that can be quarried and used for the foundation 
of streets and on sidewalk work, to the city's advantage. By 
using the stone from these two ledges and purchasing trap- 



326 



ANNUAL REPOKTS. 



rock, the city will have a sufficient supply of good road material 
for a number of years to come. 



Streets Accepted as Public Highways in 1909, under the 

Betterment Act. 



Name of Street. 


Ward. 


From 


To 


Width 
in Feet. 


Length 
in Feet. 


Date of 
Acceptance. 


Fremont ave. . . 
Lovell st. . . . 
Lowell st. . . 
Mallet st. . . . 
Merriam st. . . 
Parker st. . . . 
West st. ... 


2 
7 
5 
7 
2 
2 
7 


Bowdoin st. . 
Broadway 
Albion st. 
Willow ave. . 
Somerville ave. 
Washington st. 
Highland ave. 




Lincoln park. 
Electric ave. 
Vernon st. . . 
Liberty ave. . . 
Charlestown st. . 
Fremont ave. 
Hawthorne st. . 


30 
40 
40 
40 
30 
35 
30 


232 
385 
867 
657 
510 
203 
192 


Dec. 24 
Dec. 10 
Aug. 25 
Dec. 3 
Sept. 10 
Dec. 3 
Dec. 3 


Total .... 






(0.58 miles) 




3,046 


.... 



Length of Public Streets in Each Ward. 



Ward one 
Ward two 
Ward three 
Ward four 
Ward five 
Ward six 
Ward seven 



Total length of public streets in the city 



Miles. 

9.494 

8.533 

7.479 

9.390 

11.373 

12.447 

16.021 

74.737 



niles of Edgestone, Brick, Granolithic, and Gravel Sidewalks 

in Each Ward. 



Ward one 
Ward two 
Ward three 
Ward four 
Ward five 
Ward six 
Ward seven 





Brick and 






Granolithic 


Gravel 


Edgestone. 


Sidewalk. 


Sidewalk 


16.893 


12.432 


4.461 


13.799 


6.091 


7.708 


13.921 


11.915 


2.003 


13.819 


10.524 


3.295 


19.073 


12.096 


6.977 


21.649 


15.750 


5 899 


21.430 


12.284 


9.770 



Total miles in the city 



120.584 



=81.192 



*Includes 11.88 miles granolithic and tar concrete walk. 



40.113 



Table Showing Sidewalks Constructed (not exceeding one-half cost assessed on abutters) and Paved Gutters Laid in Connection Therewith in 1909. 



Street. 



Alpme 

Ashland 

♦Autumn 

Boston avenue 



♦Broadway 

♦Campbell park. 

Cedar 

*Chapel 

Claremon 

Curtis 

Dana 

Dimick 



*Elm. 



Fenwick 

•Henry avenue . 



Highland avenue . 

♦Highland avenue. 
•Medford 

Medford 

Medford 

Medford 

Moore 

♦Moore 

Packard avenue . . 
♦Partridge avenue . 

Pearson avenue . . 
•Sewall 

Shawmut 



•Summer and Elm. 

Trull 

Walnut 

Walnut 

Washington 



•Willow avenue . 



Totals. 



WARD. 



Side. 



Both 

Southeasterly . 
Both 



Northeasterly . 

Northerly 

Westerly 

Northwesterly . 
Northeasterly . 

Easterly 

Easterly 

Easterly 

Both 



Easterly . 



Both, 
Both . 



Southwesterly , 

Southwesterly . 
Northeasterly . 
Northeasterly . 
Northeasterly . 
Northeasterly . 

Easterly 

Westerly 

Easterly 

Westerly 

Both 

Both 

Northeasterly . 

Northeasterly . 

Easterly 

Easterly 

Easterly 

Southerly 



Northwesterly . 



From 



Cedar 

Summer 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Estate of Annie R. Bates. 

Meacham road 

Lexington avenue 

(Where not laid) and Chandler 

Holland 

Broadway 

Everett avenue 

Concord avenue 



Willow avenue. 



Broadway 

Highland avenue 



Porter . 



Cherry 

Tennyson 

Walnut 

Walnut 

Gilman square 

Holland 

Holland 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Morrison avenue 

Grant 

Estate of Mary Weeks 

Willow avei. to Cutter ave. 

Medford 

Estate of No. 91 

Estate of No. 91 

Fitchburg R. R 



Morrison avenue. 



To 



June. Princeton and Alpine 

Sartwell avenue 

Bonair 

Opp. Pritchard avenue. . . . 



Kingston 

Morrison avenue 

st. easterly side at No. 19. 

Mead 

Professors row 

Bonair 

Calvin , 



Elston . 



Jaques (where not laid) . 
Lexington avenue 



Conwell. 



Southeasterly about 150 ft. 

Centrali 

R. R. Bridge 

Highland avenue 

R. R. Bridge (where not laid) 

Mead 

Mead 

Professors row 

Medford 

Boston avenue 

Temple 



to Grove street. 
Vernon 



Highland avenue 
No. 330 



Appleton. 



Width of 
Sidewalk 
in Feet. 



5.00 
5.00 
3.00 
11.00 ) 
8.33 J 
11 to 20 
6.67 
6.67 
6.67 
6.67 
6.67 
6.67 
6.67 

10.00 

6.67 
6.67 

10.00 

10.00 
8.33 
8.33 
8.33 
8.33 
6.67 
6.67 

10.00 
6.67 
7.5 
6.67 
6.67 
7.50 ) 

10.00 J 
6.67 
6.67 
6.67 

10.00 

8.33 



Materials. 



Gravel and 

Edges tone. 

Lin. Ft. 



1,329.4 



622.6 



387.5 

564.9 
1,485.9 

1,722.6 
Grano. 6.5 
Sod rem. 
width. 
954.9 



Brick 6.0 
Sod rem. 
width. 



574.2 
605.6 
91.3 
700.2 
712.1 
1,621.5 



2,612.4 



81.9 
127.2 



Grano. 5.0 
Sod. rem. 
width. 



14,194.2 



Brick. 

Sq. Yds. 



242.0 
217.80 



154.50 
284.4 

244!o 



272.0 

296.3 

400.6 
136.8 

144.9 

186.2 

497.4 

'318.3 

812.70 
250.4 

909.9 

754.5 

740.9 
117.0 



Total 
Cost. 



•11,281.04 
313.11 
368.97 

561.87 

244.81 
415.27 
415.95 
470.66 
583.81 

1,545.77 
320.1 

1,662.05 

473.97 

996.13 
683.23 

185.37 

217.35 

286.95 

550.39 

602.05 

88.01 

687.15 

1,468.61 

1,713.96 

555.33 

2,671.17 

1,126.74 

305.49 

1,253.26 

824.38 
110.87 
111.64 
801.53 

269.40 



6,980.6 $24,166.39 



Total assessment, f 12,083. 18. Net cost to city, $12,083.21. Amount of edgestone and brick sidewalks, including granolithic and tar, in private streets 



Totals: (Gravel sidewalks, 



•Denotes granolithic sidewalks. 



3.318 miles; brick, granolithic and tar sidewalks, 2.718 miles.) 



Paved Gutters. 



Sq. Yds. 



443.1 



207.5 



129.2 

188!3 
495.3 

'574.2 



318.3 



191.4 
201.9 
30.4 
233.4 
237.4 
540.5 

870.8 



27.3 
42.4 



Cost. 



$ 790.32 



499.15 



233.31 

424.71 
1,012.27 

1,157.24 



836.10 



953.43 

536.74 

601.71 

1,129.28 

1,824.41 



175.58 



4,731.4 $10,174.25 



CITY ENGINEER. 327 

Table of Street Construction. 

*Streets paved with granite blocks 
Streets paved with "Hassam" pavement . 

Streets paved with asphalt 

Streets paved with vitrified brick (Davis square) 
Streets paved with "bitulithic" .... 
Combination pavement (concrete base with bitu 

minous top) 

**Streets macadamized 

Streets graveled or unimproved .... 

Total ' 94.93 



juare Yds. 


Miles. 


75,382 


3.04 


36,802 


1.80 


10,410 


0.73 


5,640 


0.20 


14,689 


0.88 




1.68 




66.05 




20.55 



*Also 31.9 miles (single track) electric railway, paved with granite, 
asphalt, "bitulithic." 

**Includes 2.84 miles boulevard, and 1.17 miles state highway. 

During the year the Engineering department has made 
plans and established grades for the acceptance, under the bet- 
terment act, of seven new public streets, a total length of 3,046 
feet. 

Two plans have been made of private streets for acceptance 
as public streets during the year, as ordered, but not as yet 
made public, and there are plans for acceptance of twelve other 
private streets, previously made, on file in the office that for 
various reasons are still unaccepted as public ways. 

The total length of public streets in the city is 74.737 miles, 
and private streets, 21.190 miles. 

A number of street names have been changed and plans 
made showing a re-numbering of the buildings, and all old 
numbering plans revised, new houses plotted, and numbers as- 
signed. 

Some of the old main thoroughfares should be re-num- 
bered throughout their entire length, so as to eliminate half 
numbers and letters now being used, as many of these old 
streets have outgrown their original numbering. 

There are many streets, avenues, courts, and places in the 
city of the same or very similar name, which should be changed 
to prevent the confusion and inconvenience now existing. 

About 170 street lines and grades have been given by the 
department during the year for builders and private parties 
applying for established grades and lines in connection with 
the erection of buildings and fences and grading of property. 
Some order or ordinance should be adopted whereby parties on 
private streets shall have official grade indicated, so that any 
improvements made will conform to the established grade of 
the street when accepted by the city as a public way, 



328 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Stone monuments have been set at a number of street 
intersections and angles to define and preserve the true lines of 
public streets, and this -work should be continued as much as 
possible each year. By setting these stone bounds or monu- 
ments, in Portland cement concrete, at the level of the surface 
of the ground, or flush with the surface of the sidewalk, they 
can be used as permanent "Bench Marks" throughout the city 
by establishing their exact elevations, and thereby being a great 
convenience and saving of time in giving grades, not only for 
the City Engineering department, but also for all other sur- 
veyors. In the report of 1907 a table was given compiled from 
reports, maps, and office notes, showing the location of stone 
bounds, as set, for defining street lines and angles ; the year 
when set, and whether existing or removed at the present time, 
from 1860 to 1907 inclusive. 

Lines and grades have been given for the erection of new 
city buildings, and plans and sketches made for the laying out 
of the surrounding grounds. 

Lines and grades have been given for laying 8,250 linear 
feet of new city water mains, varying in size from two inches to 
twelve inches in diameter. Two hundred and eleven new house 
services, forty-seven gates, thirty-four hydrants, seven water 
posts, and three blow-offs have been located and recorded, 
sketches and plans made showing the same, and the large water 
works map corrected to date, and a large number of old meters 
and services have been located and recorded. 

A set of block plans should be made covering the entire 
city area from accurate surveys made during the past twenty- 
five years, and compared section by section with the deed 
dimensions and areas recorded in the Assessors' department, 
and in this manner the correct areas of land determined. 

This set of plans would also be of value to the Water de- 
partment and various other departments, and would more than 
pay for the cost of making ; three of these sectional plans have 
already been made. 

All plans of estates in Somerville recorded at the Registry 
of Deeds, East Cambridge, including land court plans, have 
been copied, titles examined, and abstracts from deeds made 
for the purpose of assessments, and the proportional part of the 
cost of new work computed, and schedules of assessments made 
out showing the property owners ; also copies have been made 
of all city plans where land has been taken for highways or 
sewers, and these have been filed and recorded at the Registrv, 
East Cambridge, as required by law. 



CITY ENGINEER. I 329 

Plans have been made and photographs taken where acci- 
dents have occurred on the city work or where boundaries 
were in dispute, and special plans and data prepared for the use 
of the city solicitor in court cases and hearings. 

Plans have been made by the various companies and cor- 
porations, and filed in this office, showing the locations of poles, 
tracks, and conduits in this city, which have been granted by 
the board of aldermen during the year ; and the work of plac- 
ing overhead wires in conduits underground and removing all 
poles from streets should be extended as rapidly as possible. 

The Boston Elevated Railway Company have extended 
their surface car tracks through Union street, connecting at 
Broadway and Mystic avenue, and have made extensive repairs 
in their roadbed in this city during the past year, replacing the 
old tracks with new and heavier rails, filling the space between 
the ties with Portland cement concrete, and grouting the 
granite block pavement with cement, on Highland avenue the 
entire length, Medford street, between Highland avenue and 
Cross street, and Broadway, between Cross street and the Bos- 
ton city line. Also, new rails have been laid on Broadway, be- 
tween Clarendon avenue and North street. 

Where double car tracks have been laid in streets, leaving 
narrow roadways on either side, it is impossible to maintain a 
macadam surface, even at a heavy expense yearly, and these 
streets should be permanently paved with a suitable pavement, 
adapted to the character of the surroundings and amount of 
traffic and conditions encountered. 

There are 31.9 miles of electric railroad (single track loca- 
tion) laid at the present time in the city's streets ; and in water- 
ing the main thoroughfares, time and expense could be saved 
by utilizing this trackage for running street-sprinkler cars, the 
same as in a number of cities throughout the state. 

Bridges and Grade Crossing Work. After many years of 
litigation, the matter of constructing bridges over the main line 
and branch locations of the Boston & Maine Railroad, on the 
line of Lowell street, North Somerville, has been satisfactorily 
settled. 

Early in the year the mayor, in a friendly interview with 
the president of the railroad company, came to an understand- 
ing whereby the street should be raised and bridges constructed 
over the tracks, the railroad company contributing $15,000 
toward the total expense of the contemplated work, 



330 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

An act was passed by the Legislature April 16, 1909, 
authorizing the city of Somerville to construct bridges over the 
railroad tracks at Lowell street. 

A plan was made for the laying out of this street between 
Albion and Vernon streets, including the bridges and ap- 
proaches over the railroad tracks and land takings for slopes, 
etc., which was adopted by the board of aldermen August 25, 
1909, and approved by the board of railroad commissioners. 

The concrete abutments and retaining walls, bridge work, 
etc., within the railroad location are being constructed by the 
railroad company, and the approaches, raising of buildings, 
grading, street construction, and all other work outside the 
railroad location is being done by the city ; this work, com- 
menced late in the fall, has progressed rapidly, and will be com- 
pleted in a short time, and the street opened for travel earlv 
in 1910. 

The obtaining of this much-desired improvement and im- 
portant crossing over the railroad at this location will be of 
great benefit to the city in many ways. 

Following is the amount expended by the city in 1909 on 
this work : — 

Filling and grading Lowell street, slopes, cellars, and 
yards, re-setting edgestones, etc., — labor, $2,792; 
teaming, $133.70; materials, $751.39 .... $3,677 09 

Raising eight buildings to new grades, — labor, $460; 
masonry work, $2,223; carpenter work, $445.97; 
plumbing and heating work, $506.36; lumber, $529.37, 4,164 70 

Sewer changes, — manholes, drains, catch basins, etc. . 436 58 

Advertising, $13; photographs, $16.50; inspection and en- 
gineering, $125 154 50 



Total $8,432 87 

The contract work has been continued during the past 
year on the abolition of the Somerville-avenue grade crossing 
(described in last year's report), and the large amount of work 
required for this alteration will be entirely completed within a 
few months. 

The total cost of the work required to be done at this 
crossing will be apportioned as determined by the court, 
namely : The steam railroad companies, sixty-five per cent. ; 
the street railway company, thirteen per cent. ; the state, twelve 
per cent.; and the city, ten per cent. 

The same special commission appointed by the court that 
determined what alterations should be made at the Somerville- 



CITY ENGINEEK. 331 

avenue crossing have reported their findings on other grade 
crossings of the Fitchburg railroad at Medford street, Webster 
avenue, Dane street, and Park street, and a decree will be is- 
sued by the court in accordance therewith. 

The plans for abolishment of these crossings were de- 
scribed in the two previous annual reports ; and at two streets 
the plan adopted is the same as proposed by the city's scheme 
presented to the commission, at the other three streets the plan 
adopted is just the reverse of the city's scheme. 

The total cost of the work, when completed, will be appor- 
tioned as follows: The steam railroad company, sixty-five per 
cent. ; the state, twenty-five per cent. ; and the city, ten per 
cent., except at the Webster-avenue crossing, where the steam 
railroad and city pay the same percentage of cost as at other 
crossings, the state twelve and one-half per cent., and the street 
railway company twelve and one-half per cent. 



SEWER DEPARTMENT. 
Sewers Construction Account. 

STATEMENT OF EXPENSES, 1909. 

Constructing "separate system" sewers (as- 
sessments levied) petitioned for . $6,504 34 

Constructing "separate system" sewers (no 

assessments) 4,539 76 

Constructing "combined system" sewers 

(assessments levied) petitioned for . 1,818 58 

Constructing "combined system" sewer (no 

assessment) 228 74 

Constructing storm drains .... 868 91 

Constructing fifty catch basins, street 

drainage . . . 2,650 02 

Materials furnished sundry parties . . 237 15 

Sewer assessment of 1908 abated ... 28 80 

Sundry expenses, books and printing . 31 50 

Materials on hand December 31, 1909 . . 274 16 

Total expenditure 

Transferred to Electrical department 

(underground construction) 
Transferred to Fire department (additional 

apparatus) 

Transferred to Highway department (paved 

gutters, etc.) 

Transferred for purchasing additional 

school land 

Total debit ,..,-,,, $36,352 91 



$17,181 


96 


1,500 


00 


5,000 00 


7,670 


95 


5,000 


00 



332 AXXUAL REPORTS. 



CREDIT. 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1903 . $10,832 03 

Appropriation, 1909 30,000 00 

Assessments levied, sewers constructed, 

1909 7,903 94 

Reserves on contracts, due 1910 . . . 622 80 
Amounts received from other departments 

and companies 259 77 

Materials on hand December 31, -1908 . . 500 38 



Total credit $50,118 92 



Balance unexpended $13,766 01 

The greater part of the new construction work has been 
done by contract, and the remainder by the city employing day 
labor where old structures were to be remodeled or replaced by 
some difficult construction work. 

All materials have been furnished by the city, and the 
prices paid for drain pipe, cement, supplies, etc., for the season 
have been by contract with the lowest bidder, and at an un- 
usually low rate. 

A number of sewers have been constructed as petitioned 
for in different sections of the city, or as considered necessary 
for the drainage system, and portions of the cost of construc- 
tion assessed on the abutting estates under orders adopted by 
the board of aldermen. 

Short lines of storm drains and overflows from congested 
sewers have been constructed during the year in the most- 
needed districts. 

The "separate system" sewers (those built for house 
drainage only) have been extended in a number of streets, and 
this system should be extended yearly until all the flooded dis- 
tricts in the city have two complete systems of drainage, the 
old sewer to be used for storm and surface water. The city 
pays the entire cost of these new sewer extensions for house 
drainage. 



i > 



Wherever these new sewers are constructed, the house 
plumbing should be changed where necessary, and the house 
drains and conductor, or surface water drains, re-connected 
with both systems as soon as possible. 

Xew sewers and drains were constructed during the year 
varying in size from eight-inch pipe to twelve-inch pipe, in the 
following localities : — 






CITY ENGINEEK. 333 

"Separate system" sewers in : — 

Belknap street, — Broadway to Russell road. 

Cedar street, — (east side) Elm street to Sartwell 

avenue. 
Chetwynd road, — proposed street to near Curtis 

street. 
Curtis avenue, — proposed street to near Curtis street. 
Elm street, — (north side) Linden avenue to Cherry 

street, and (south side) opposite Cherry street to 

Mossland street. 
Florence street, — (west side) Washington street to 

angle in street. 
Hill street, — Broadway to near Fairmount avenue. 
Powder House boulevard, — (south side) Leonard 

street to near Packard avenue. 
Proposed street, — (West Somerville) Conwell avenue 

to Chetwynd road. 
Walker street, — Leonard street to near Broadway. 

"Combined system" sewers in: — 

Acadia park, — Somerville avenue, easterly. 

Ossipee road, — Packard avenue, easterly to proposed 

street. 
Powder House boulevard, — (north side) Curtis street, 

southeasterly. 
South street, — east of Emery street to east of Horace 

street. 
Whitfield road, — Curtis street, southeasterly. 

Storm drain in : — 

Middlesex avenue, — (west side) Winthrop-avenue ex- 
tension to Garfield avenue. 

Summary of Work. Sixteen new sewers and drains have 
been constructed during the year, a total length of 8,965.6 
linear feet (1.698 miles), at a cost of $13,960.33 ; plans have been 
made showing these sewers in detail, and assessments levied on 
a portion of them, amounting to $7,903.94. (See tabular state- 
ment of sewers and drains for 1909, showing itemized statement 
of work and cost.) 

The total length of the city's drainage system is 100.266 
miles, 25.79 miles being on the "separate system" and 6.566 
miles of storm drains, and the entire cost of construction has 
amounted to about $1,235,725, exclusive of the amount paid to 
the state for assessments for the construction of the North 
Metropolitan sewerage system. 

Fifty new catch basins have been constructed in the high- 
ways during the year, at an average cost of $53 per basin, mak- 



334 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ing a total of 1,565 basins in the city for street drainage pur- 
poses, constructed and maintained as follows : — 

By the city (sewer department) : — 

• Located in streets and subways 

Located in city boulevard 

Located in parks (12), other city lots (9) 

Total catch basins constructed and maintained 

by city 1,565 

By Boston & Maine Railroad Company on railroad 

locations 29 basins 

By state, located in boulevards 52 " 

81 



1,515 basins 


29 " 


21 " 



Total catch basins in city for storm drainage purposes . . 1,646 

Metropolitan Sewer Connections. All of the city's ten con- 
nections with the North Metropolitan sewerage system are in 
good condition. No new main connections have been required. 
At the Somerville-avenue-Poplar-street connection with 
the Metropolitan sewer, records compiled from an automatic 
recording clock placed in the "regulator chamber" on the com- 
bined system show this outlet to have been cut off as follows : — 

Year 1909, completely closed 459 hours, partly closed 683 hours. 
In previous years the following: — 

Year 1908, completely closed 469 hours, partly closed 605 hours. 

1907, " " 206 " " ' " 534 " 

1906, " " 289 " " " 331 " 

1905, " " 297 " " " 548 " 

1904, " " 279 " " " 922 " 

1903, " " 180 " " " 167 " 

1902, " " 376 " " " 377 " 

1901, " " 386 " " " 225 " 

1900, " " 353 " " " 114 " 

The city's assessment for the Metropolitan sewer system 
for the past year was $34,969.15 on construction account and 
$21,215.16 for maintenance, and the total amount paid the com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts for this state sewer has been 
$696,389.63 (1892-1909, both years inclusive). The total 
length of the Metropolitan sewerage system mains running 
through the city amounts to 3.368 miles. 

New Work. The separate system should be extended in 
the old sections of the city each year, as the appropriation will 
allow. 

The construction of the storm drainage system, com- 
menced in the year 1905, should be continued in the vicinity of 
North Somerville, where buildings and new streets are being 
rapidly constructed, the outlet for this district being through 
the city of Medford into the Mystic river. 



CITY ENGINEER. 335 

A large storm overflow drain has been contemplated for 
some time at the East Cambridge line, across private lands 
from bomerville avenue, discharging into the head of Miller's 
river; and when the new dam is completed on the old site of 
Craigie bridge, this matter of improving the city's drainage 
system should be carried out. 

The accompanying table shows an itemized cost of sewers 
constructed during 1909, and in the 1907 report tables are given 
showing sewers constructed on the "separate system" ; storm 
drains constructed ; size and materials of construction of the 
city's entire drainage system : — 

Sewers Maintenance Account. 

STATEMENT OF EXPENSES, 1909. 

Maintenance of sewers, including cleaning 

and flushing (100.3 miles) . . . $2,642 58 

Maintenance of catch basins, cleaning and 

flushing (1,565) 7,559 28 

Changing line and grade and repairing 

catch basins 471 33 

Changing line and grade and repairing 

manholes 32 27 

Repairing old sewers 179 05 

Inspection and location of house drains . 328 19 

New tools and supplies 198 57 

Repairs of tools and property ... 79 29 

Sundry expenses, car fares, telephone, 

books, etc 106 22 

Maintenance of sewer department yards and 

buildings 405 64 

.Work and materials furnished other depart- 
ments and companies .... 1,198 48 

Total debit $13,200 90 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation $12,000 00 

Amounts received from other departments 
and companies, — labor, materials fur- 
nished 1,184 66 

Received for old hose 45 84 

Total credit $13,230 50 



Balance unexpended $29 60 

Value of tools and property on hand used in 'maintenance 

of sewers $927 20 

A permanent force of men and teams are kept continually 
at work flushing, cleaning, and repairing the city's drainage sys- 
tem, catch basins, etc., the expense necessarily increasing yearly 
as lengths of sewers, drains, and catch basins are added to the 
system. 



336 ! ANNUAL KEPORTS. 

About 7,000 cubic yards of deposit have been removed 
from the catch basins and sewers during the year, and the aver- 
age cost per mile for this cleaning and maintaining has 
amounted to $103.50. 

One hundred and fifteen catch basins and sixty-six man- 
holes have been repaired and grade or line changed. 

A number of repairs have been made on some of the old 
sewers, alterations made in the outlets, and overflows and extra 
manholes built for the purpose of improving the system. 

Two hundred and eighty-four permits have been issued to 
licensed drain layers for connecting buildings with the main 
sewers, thirty-eight being for repairs or alterations, all of the 
work being done under the supervision of the city's inspector. 

There are to date about 14,114 private drain connections 
with the city's drainage system. 

During the year the sewer department has done consider- 
able miscellaneous work for other city departments and outside 
companies where alterations and new construction work has 
been required, furnishing materials and labor, and being re- 
imbursed for the same to the amount of $1,184.66. 

There are a number of old private sewers that should be 
released to the city, so that they can be thoroughly repaired or 
re-constructed and put in a good sanitary condition, and be 
maintained in the future by the city. 

PUBLIC GROUNDS DEPARTMENT. 

At the present time there are nineteen separate parcels of 
land located in all parts of Somerville, used for parks and play- 
grounds, amounting to 66.4 acres, and also a boulevard about 
one and one-third miles in length maintained by the city; in- 
cluded in this total area are playgrounds where the land is 
owned by private parties and leased to the city, for use, in the 
following localities : On Winthrop avenue (Fellsway east), two 
and one-half acres ; Knowlton street, one and one-half acres ; 
the Broadway athletic field in West Somerville, 4.4 acres ; and 
the cemetery lot, .7 acre. 

An additional area of land, about one-quarter of an acre, 
situated on the northerly side of Broadway, opposite Simpson 
avenue, formerly known as the Walnut Hill schoolhouse lot, 
has been placed under the care of this department, by an order 
passed in the board of aldermen April 23, 1909. 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF SEWERS BUILT IN 1909. 



LOCATION. 



Name op Street. 



Acadia Park 

•Belknap street .... 

•Cedar street (easterly side) 
•Elm street (northerly side) 

(Southerly side) . 
•Florence street (westerly side) 

•Hill street 

t Middlesex ave. (westerly side) 

Ossipee road, east . 

Powder House Blvd. (north'ly side). 
•Powder House Blvd. (south'ly side) 
•Proposed street 
•Curtis avenue and 
•Chetwynd road 
South street . 
•Walker street 
Whitfield road 



Somerville avenue 
Broadway 

Elm street 

Linden avenue 

Cedar street . 

Opp. Cherry street 

Washington st. 

Broadway 

Winthrop ave. extension 

Packard avenue . 

End of sewer built 1902 
Leonard street 
Conwell avenue 
Proposed street 
Proposed street . 
End of sewer built 1876 
Leonard street 
Curtis street . 



Easterly 
Russell road 

Sartwell avenue 

Cedar street . 
Cherry street 
Mossland street 
Near angle . 
Near Fairmount avenue 
Garfield ave. 

Proposed street 

Curtis street . 

Near Packard avenue 

Chetwynd road 

Near Curtis street 

Near Curtis street 

End of sewer built 1872 

Near Broadway 

S'e'ly to old sewer 



ITEMS OF CONSTRUCTION AND COST. 



Contractor. 



Bartholomew Burke 
Wm. J. McCarthy Co. . 

James Fannon 

James Fannon . j 
James Fannon 
James Fannon 
Timothy F. Crimmings . 
Timothy F. Crimmings . 
Day labor . . ■ 

Timothy F. Crimmings . 

Day labor 

Timothy F. Crimmings . 

Bartholomew Burki: 

Bartholomew Burke 

Bartholomew Burk e 

I 
Day labor 

Bartholomew Burkt: 

Timothy F. Crimmings 



Material 

Excavated. 



Hardpan 
Hardpan and rock 

Hardpan and clay . 

Clay . 

Clay . 

Clay . 

Clay . 

Hardpan and rock 

Filling 

Hardpan and rock 

Hardpan 

Hardpan and rock 
Hardpan and rock 
Hardpan and rock 
Hardpan and rock 
Filling . 

Sand and filling . 
Hardpan and rock 



7.7 
7.2 
8.4 
11.3 
14.2 
13.9 
9.7 
7.2 
6.1 
5.7 
6.7 
8.7 
6.2 
6.8 
8.6 
7.9 
7.3 
8.0 
5.7 
7.3 



276.6 
501.4 
225.0 
336.0 
409.4 
587.9 
594.7 
450.1 
212.2 
535.0 
380.1 
306.2 
207.0 
1,099.5 
439.2 
622.0 
618.5 
159.2 
648.0 
357.6 



919.0 






2.0 
46.0 



299.1 
99.5 
234.0 
364.5 

3.5 
65.6 



■§■8 

o o 



$4.00 



2.40 
2.70 
2.70 
2.70 



4.00 
2.50 



$38.10 
39.86 
47.10 
47.10 
58.17 
58.17 
58.17 
41.24 
39.60 



40.01 
37.54 
37.54 
37.54 
32.05 
32.10 
45.62 



Pipe Sewer, Cost per Lineal Foot. 



Excavating, Re- 
filling, and 
Pipe Laying. 



c £ 

'it 



$0.45 
0.55 
0.65 
1.05 
1.30 
1.40 
1.10 
0.63 
0.40 
0.63 
0.40 
0.45 



0.38 
0.48 
0.42 
0.45 
0.86 
0.30 
0.43 



Total length and cost of new sewers and drains built in 1909, 



* Separate system sewers. 

t Storm drain. Cost includes two catch basins. 



8,965.6 (1.698 miles.) 






$0.23 
0.20 



0.21 
0.17 



$0.05 
0.04 



0.12 
0.06 



0.43 
0.19 
0.19 



0.10 
0.04 
0.09 



#0.02 
0.02 



0.02 
0.04 



$0.01 



Total length of public sewers in the city, January 1, 1910 
Total length of private sewers in the city, January 1, 1910 

Total length of sewers in the city, January 1, 1910 
Total length of storm drains in the city, January 1, 1910 

Total length of the city drainage system, January 1, 1910 . 

Total length of Met. sewerage system mains running through the city 



459,989.1 feet. 
34,748.0 feet. 



494,737.1 feet, or 93.700 miles. (25.790 miles separate system.) 
34,665.3 feet, or 6.566 miles. 

100.266 miles. 

3.368 miles. 



m 



$0.33 



< 



$0.89 
1.12 



1.42 
1.39 
1.62 

1.23 

1.11 

1.63 



1.65 
0.75 
1.30 



$246.70 
562.28 



640.92 
294.82 
868.91 

843.85 

228.74 
1,794.54 

3,367.53 

262 30 
485.17 
465.73 



$245.10 
561.50 



3,241.74 

178.31 
484.76 
464 86 



$13,960.33 $7,903.94 



CITY ENGINEER. 337 

This area of parks and playgrounds, in comparison with 
other cities, is one of the best, Somerville being very small in 
area and the most densely-populated city in the state, averag- 
ing about 18,500 in population to a square mile. 

Four of the larger pleasure parks, namely, Central Hill, 
Prospect Hill, Powder House park, and Broadway park, are 
beautifully-laid-out spots in a thickly-settled city, and famous 
for what they represent historically. 

At the present time there are seven baseball fields and 
three football fields in use and under the city's supervision, as 
well as numerous smaller playgrounds, on which are located an 
outdoor gymnasium, running tracks, tennis courts, etc., for rec- 
reation and rest, where children can play and enjoy themselves, 
and are safe from the dangers of a thickly-settled city. 

There are a number of vacant lots in the city, owned by 
private parties, large enough for the purpose of establishing 
recreation grounds and breathing spaces, which undoubtedly 
could be obtained for short term leases by payment of the taxes 
to the owner of the property, and be of great benefit to a large 
number in the congested parts of the city. 

Additional apparatus should be erected on some of the 
principal parks and playgrounds, for the smaller children's 
pleasure, where a regular park employee can have the care of 
the same, and supervisors employed when necessary,. 

Permanent shelters, constructed of reinforced concrete, 
should be erected on several of the play fields, in place of some 
of the old wooden structures now existing. 

At the westerly end of Lincoln park a swimming pool hav- 
ing an area of not over 3,000 square feet could be constructed, 
with a concrete bottom and side walls, at a small cost, and 
would be a source of much enjoyment to a very large number 
of children in the immediate vicinity. 

_ Considering the popularity and general feeling of the pub- 
lic in regard to athletics and outdoor exercise in general, as 
shown in our own city in the last ten years' time, the question 
arises of the city's having at least one large permanently- 
located field for such a purpose, inasmuch as the best and only 
enclosed field at present in the city is maintained on leased 
land, belonging to the trustees of Tufts College, which in a 
short time will not be available for the city's use ; the lease ex- 
pires July 1, 1911, or sooner, if the college authorities so desire. 
Notice of such termination has been received, accompanied by 



338 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

a plan showing the field laid out into streets and building lots, 
but no definite action has been taken as yet. 

A plan has been made recently showing the lay-out of a 
new proposed field where all kinds of athletic contests could be 
held, and could be constructed in a term of years, a portion at 
a time, without handicapping the finances of the city in the 
least. The location of this proposed field is in the north- 
westerly section of the city bordering Alewife brook and the 
Powder House boulevard, including an area of about ten acres, 
and negotiations are pending with the Metropolitan park com- 
mission whereby this area may be transferred to the city, per- 
manently, for recreation purposes. 

About three and one-half acres have already been graded, 
and the state has continued the straightening and widening of 
the brook the past year, the part bordering this city being 
nearly completed, and with the extension of the boulevard along 
the banks, the improvement of a large area of low land in this 
section of the city will enhance the value of surrounding prop- 
erty. 

An area owned by the city, and known as the Collins and 
Ham ledge property, located on Clarendon hill, near the Cam- 
bridge boundary line, might be developed in the future into a 
pretty pleasure park, similar in nature to the Powder House 
park ; also, the Holland-street property, owned by the city, and 
situated in West Somerville, could be developed in the future 
by laying out a portion of the area for streets and house lots, 
and the remainder used for recreation purposes. 

With all of these various parcels of land referred to prop- 
erly developed in the future as parks, playgrounds, and resting 
places, the city will be amply provided in this line, and second 
to none in the state. 

Early in the year a Playgrounds Association was formed in 
the city, and funds contributed by citizens and a sum of $1,000 
set aside by the city from the public grounds appropriation for 
the special equipment of grounds and supervision of play fields. 

Certain areas were used on the city's parks, playgrounds, 
and schoolyards, which were equipped with swings, sand boxes, 
and various kinds of gymnastic apparatus, and supervisors em- 
ployed during the summer months. 

Many children enjoyed themselves at these outdoor kinder- 
garten schools, while the larger boys were instructed in base- 
ball, basket ball, and other games, and in the use of gymnastic 



CITY ENGINEEE. 339 

apparatus, teams being- formed and athletic competitions held 
between the various teams. 

"Tarvia" has been applied on the macadam surface of a 
portion of Powder House boulevard, where the roadway has 
been badly worn, caused by the large amount of automobile 
travel, and this work should be continued until the entire length 
and width of this driveway has been put in a satisfactory con- 
dition ; the roadway on Prospect Hill park has received similar 
treatment, and is in excellent condition. 

At Lincoln park a new fence has been built on the Wash- 
ington-street approach to the Fitchburg railroad, by the rail- 
road company, and the city has constructed a brick sidewalk 
along this side of the park. 

On Central Hill park the soldiers' memorial has been com- 
pleted and an old walk widened, re-constructed, and extended, 
making a passageway through the centre of the park its entire 
length, having several connections with Highland avenue. 

The larger areas have been policed by regular officers from 
the police department, when required, the expense being paid 
from the police appropriation, trees and shrubs added to the 
various grounds, and bulbs, plants, and flowers furnished in 
their seasons, and during the winter time ponds flooded for 
skating when the weather was favorable. 

Several fields have been maintained for ball playing, and are 
constantly in use by the many athletic teams, the games being 
arranged for and regularly scheduled on the various grounds 
throughout the season, 298 games being provided for by 
schedule the past year. 

The city has received from the Somerville High School 
Association a portion of the cost of maintaining the enclosed 
athletic field, amounting to $352.15 for 1909 ; the association 
also pays the cost of policing the grounds at all of the school's 
contests. 

The city's assessment for Metropolitan parks and boule- 
vards for the year 1909 amounted to $16,176.28 on construction 
account, and $15,463.16 being the proportional cost for main- 
taining the same; in addition to this, the city's special assess- 
ment for the newly-constructed Wellington bridge across 
Mystic river, on the line of the Metropolitan parkway, 
amounted to $4,895.16 on construction account, and $841.92 for 
maintenance. Somerville pays a separate assessment, together 
with four other cities, of twelve and one-half per cent, of the 
cost of construction and maintenance of this new bridge, be- 



340 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



sides the proportional, part of the Metropolitan park district 
assessment. The total of the above assessments amounts to 
$37,376.52, being Somerville's proportional payment to the state 
on account of the Metropolitan park system for the year 1909. 

The total assessment paid to the state for parks and boule- 
vards amounts to $269,401.46 January 1, 1910, and the only 
length of state boulevard at present constructed in this city 
consists of seven-tenths of a mile of double roadway, located in 
the easterly part of the city, and extending between Broadway 
and Mystic river. 



Maintenance Account (Public Grounds). 

STATEMENT OF EXPENSES, 1909. 

Broadway Park (15.9 acres) : — 

Maintenance of grounds and general care 

of property, labor and teams . . $1,099 07 

Trimming and spraying trees . . . 394 00 

Tools and supplies 45 08 

Repairing tools and property ... 81 24 

Plants, flowers, bulbs, etc 187 65 



Broadway Parkway (2.0 acres, Grant street 
to Boston line): — 
Maintenance of grounds, labor and teams, 
Plants, flowers, etc 

Central Hill Park (13.1 acres):— 
Maintenance of grounds and general care 

of property, labor and teams 
Re-constructing and extending walks and 

driveways .... 

Alterations and repairs of steps 
Repairing fountain 
Tools and supplies 
Repairing tools and property 
Plants, flowers, bulbs, trees, and shrubs, 

Prospect Hill Park (2.6 acres) : — 
Maintenance of grounds and observation 

tower, labor and teams 
Improvement of roadway with "tarvia" . 

Tools and supplies 

Repairing tools and property . 

Lincoln Park (8.3 acres) : — 

Maintenance of grounds and general care 
of property, labor and teams 

Tools and supplies 

Repairing tools and property . 

Plants, flowers, bulbs, etc 



$174 00 
117 33 



$1,375 69 



596 33 
147 05 
166 35 
26 57 
22 34 
423 80 


$701 20 

113 62 

41 79 

28 94 


$1,086 02 

50 05 

113 89 

131 50 



$1,807 04 



291 33 



2,758 13 



885 55 



1,381 46 



CITY ENGINEEK. 341 

Tufts Park (4.5 acres): — '■ 
Maintenance of grounds and general care 

of property, labor and teams . . $679 58 

Tools and supplies ..... 19 96 

Repairing tools and property ... 11 77 

Plants, flowers, bulbs, etc. . . . 143 23 



Paul Revere Park: — 
Maintenance of grounds, labor . . . $11 00 

Building foundation for tablet presented 

to city 32 94 



Broadway Athletic Field, Tufts College land 
(4.4 acres leased) : — 
Maintenance of grounds and care of prop- 
erty, labor and teams .... $748 40 

Tools and supplies 24 70 

Repairing property, fence, seats, and 

building 154 01 



Playground, Belmont street, near Summer 
street (0.4 acre) : — 
Maintenance of grounds, labor and teams, $87 60 

Supplies 4 50 

Plants, flowers, bulbs, etc 10 00 



Playground, Broadway, corner Cedar street 
(4.2 acres) : — 
Maintenance of grounds, labor and teams, $376 28 

Supplies 19 25 



854 54 



43 94 



927 11 



Playground, Winthrop avenue (Fellsway 
east) (2.5 acres leased) : — 
Maintenance of grounds, labor and teams ... 38 80 

Playground, Glen street, corner Oliver 
street (0.9 acre + 1.5 acres leased): — 
Maintenance of grounds, labor and teams, $145 65 

Supplies . 4 20 

149 85 



Playground, Poplar street, corner Joy street 
(0.4 acre) : — 
Maintenance of grounds, labor and teams ... 29 45 

Playground, Webster avenue, near Cam- 
bridge line (0.2 acre) : — 
Maintenance of grounds, labor 5 00 

Playground, Beacon street, near Washing- 
ton street (0.2 acre) : — 
Maintenance of grounds, labor and teams ... 34 94 

Playground, Somerville avenue, corner 
Kent street (0.8 acre) : — 
Maintenance of grounds, labor and teams, $206 54 

Supplies 18 75 

225 29 



102 10 



395 53 



342 ' ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Playground, Broadway, opposite Simpson 
avenue (0.3 acre) : — . 
Maintenance of grounds, labor 10 00 

Proposed New Athletic Field, located be- 
tween Powder House boulevard and 
Alewife brook, near West Medford 
line (3.5 acres): — 
Maintenance of grounds, labor 5 00 

Cemetery, Somerville avenue (0.7 acre): — 
Maintenance of grounds, labor and teams . . . 126 55 

Powder House Boulevard (1 1-3 miles 

long) :— 
Maintenance of roadway, walks, and grass 

plots, labor and teams .... $619 92 

Improvement of roadway with "tarvia" . 487 02 



1,106 94 
Incidentals . 62^ 40 

Special Equipment and Instruction on Play- 
grounds, 1909: — 

20 new sand boxes, 30 additional swings, 
2 additional horizontal bars, 2 addi- 
tional pairs parallel bars, 2 additional 
pairs basket ball goals, hammocks, 
balls, and other supplies . . . $706 05 

Special supervision and instruction (9 

weeks) 297 00 

1,003 05 



Total expenditure, maintenance (66.4 acres) 57.3 acres 
city property + 8.4 acres leased land, 0.7 acre ceme- * 
tery and 1.36 miles boulevard, and 0.54 miles park- 
way—roads $12,244 00 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation . . . . _ . . $11,750 00 

Received from High School Athletic Asso- 
ciation, repairing seats and fence, 
1909, and special maintenance of field 
for high school games .... 352 15 

Received from other departments for sod 

and materials 110 69 

Received from Boston Elevated Railway 
Company, partial maintenance Broad- 
way parkway, 1908 .... 50 00 

Total credit $12,262 84 

Balance unexpended $18 84 

Value of tools and property used in maintenance of 

grounds $1,500 00 






CITY ENGINEER. 343 



APPENDED TABLE. 



Following this report is a table giving names of all streets 
in the city, public and private, lengths, widths, and the total 
mileage ; in the 1901 report a table was given showing the loca- 
tion and names of public squares in the city, and in the 1898 re- 
port old names of certain streets as formerly known. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ernest W. Bailey, 

City Engineer, 



344 



ANNUAL REPOKTS. 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION, LENGTH AND WIDTH OF 
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE STREETS. 













Length. 








Public 


Width 






Street. 


From 


To 


or 


in 








Private. 


Feet. 
















Public. 


Private. 


Abdell pi. . . . 


Somerville ave. . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


25 




203 


Aberdeen road . 


Cedar st. . . . 


Highland ave. . 




Private. 


40 




411 


Aberdeen road ext. 


Angle .... 


Westerly . . 




Private. 


30 


. . . - 


67 


Acadia pk. . ♦ . 


Somerville ave. . 


Northeasterly 




Private. 


40 




256 


Adams . . . 




Broadway . . . 


Medford st. . . 




Public. 


40 


*907 




Addison pi. 




Somerville ave. . 


Southwesterly . 




Private. 


20 




150 


Adelaide rd. 




Somerville ave- . 


Easterly . . . 




Private. 


20 




138 


Adrian . . . 




Marion st. . . 


Joseph st. . . 




Public. 


40 


579 


.... 


Albion pi. . 




Albion st. . . . 


Northeasterly . 




Private. 


10 




166 


Albion ct. . 




Albion st. . . . 


Southwesterly . 




Private. 


16 




116 


Albion . . 




Central st. . . 


Cedar st. . . 




Public. 


40 


2',742 




Albion . . 




Broadway . . . 


Medford line . 




Private. 


50 




iob 


Albion ter. . 




Albion st. . . . 


Southwesterly . 




Private. 


25 




100 


Aldersey 




Walnut st. . . 


Vinal ave. . . 




Public. 


40 


508 




Aldrich . . 




Pearl st. . . . 


B. & L. R. R. . 




Public. 


40 


611 


.... 


Alfred . . 




Broadway . . . 


Medford line 




Private. 


50 




50 


Allen . . 




Somerville ave. . 


Charlestown st. 




Private. 


25 




680 


Allen ct. 




Park st. ... 


Northwesterly 




Private. 


20 




150 


Alpine . . 




Cedar st. . . . 


Southeasterly 




Public. 


30 


*667 


.... 


Alpine . . 




Alpine sf. . . 


Lowell st. 




Public. 


40 


688 




Alston . . 




Cross st. . . . 


Shawmut pi. 




Public. 


40 


567 




Ames . . 




Bartlett st. . . 


Robinson st. 




Public. 


40 


580 




Appleton 




Willow ave. . . 


Clifton st. 




Public. 


40 


548 




Appleton . 




Clifton st. . . 


Liberty ave. 




Public. 


40 


120 




Arlington . 




Franklin st. . . 


Lincoln st. . 




Public. 


40 


452 




Arnold ave. 




Porter st. . . . 


Southeasterly 




Private. 


15 




127 


Arnold ct. . 




Beacon st. . . 


Northeasterly 




Private. 


10 


.... 


115 


Arthur ct. . 




Linden st. . . 


Easterly . . 




Private. 


about 10 




100 


Arthur . . 




Broadway . . . 


Bonair st. 




Public. 


40 


'438 




Ash ave. 




Meacham st. 


East Albion st. 




Public. 


40 


554 




Ash ave. 




East Albion st. . 


Northeasterly 




Private. 


40 


.... 


151 


Ashland . . 




Summer st. . . 


Sartwell ave. 




Public. 


30 


478 


.... 


Atherton 




Central st. . . 


Beech st. 




Public. 


40 


264 




Auburn ave. 




Cross st. . . . 


B. & L. R. R. 




Private. 


30 




'600 


Austin . . 




Broadway . . . 


Mystic ave. . 




Public. 


40 


716 




Autumn . . 




Broadway . . . 


Bonair st. 




Public. 


20 


408 




Avon . . . 




School st. . . 


Central St. . 




Public. 


40 


1,360 




Avon pi. 




Cross st. . . . 


B. & L. R. R. 




Private. 


25 




150 


Banks . . 




Elm st. ... 


Summer st. . 




Public. 


40 


639 




Bartlett . . 




Vernon st. . . 


Broadway 




Public. 


40 


1,550 




Bartlett . . 




Washington st. . 


Southerly 




Private. 


20 




200 


Barton . . 




Broadway . . 


Russell road. 




Private. 


40 




382 


Bay State ave. 




Broadway . . . 


Fosket st. 




Public. 


40 


1,237 


.... 


Beach ave. 




Webster ave. 


Columbia st. 




Private. 


about 20 




200 


Beacon pi. . 




Beacon st. . . 


Northeasterly 




Private. 


15 




200 


Beacon . . 




Cambridge line . 


Somerville ave. 




Public. 


66 


6,007 




Beacon ter. 




Somerville ave. . 


Northeasterly 




Private. 


24 


.... 


no 


Bean's ct. . 




Cutter st. . . . 


Southeasterly 




Private. 


16 


.... 


100 


Beckwith circl 


e . 


Beacon st. . . 


Southwesterly 




Private. 


20 




120 


Bedford . . 




South st. . . . 


Cambridge line 




Public. 


30 


165 




Beech . . 




Somerville ave. . 


Spring st. 




Public. 


40 


800 




Bellevue ter. 




Albion st. . . . 


Northeasterly 




Private. 


20 




"90 


Belknap . . 




Broadway . . . 


Russell road. 




Private. 


40 




449 


Belmont 




Somerville ave. . 


Highland ave. 




Public. 


40 


2, 192 




Belmont pi. 




Belmont st. . . 


Southeasterly 




Private. 


25 




175 


Belmont ter. 




Belmont st. . 


Easterly . . 




Private. 


15 


.... 


137 


Benedict ave. 




Broadway . . . 


Benedict st. . 




Private. 


20 




• 2"0 


Benedict 




Union st. . . . 


Austin st. 




Public. 


40 


585 




Bennett ct. 




Bennett st. . . 


Prospect st. 




Private. 


10 




100 


Bennett . . 




Prospect st. . . 


Bennett ct. . 




Private. 


40 to 25 




400 


Benton road 




Summer st. . . 


Hudson st. . 




Public. 


40 


1,208 





Berkeley 




School st. . . . 


Central st. 




Public. 


40 


1,360 




Berwick . . 




Lawrence st. 


Northwesterly 




Private. 


2'> 




lib 


Bi^elow . . 




Boston st. . . . 


Munroe st. . 




Public. 


50 


208 




Billingham . 




Broadway . . 


William st. . 




Public. 


40 


563 




Bishop's pi. 




Glen st. . . . 


Easterly . 




Private. 


10 





75 


Blakeley ave. 




Fellsway east 


Cross st. . . 




Private. 


40 




630 


Bleachery ct. 




Somerville ave. . 


FitchburgR. R 




Private. 


30 




450 


Bolton . . 




Oak st. . . 


Houghton st. 




Public. 


40 


476 


.... 



CITY ENGINEER. 



345 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street. 



From 



To 



Public 

or 
Private. 



Width 

in 
Feet. 



Length. 



Public. Private 



Bonair . . 
Bond . . . 
Bonner ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston . . 
Boston . . 
Bow . . . 
Bow . . . 
Bowdoin 
Bowers ave. 
Bow St. pi. 
Bradford ave. 
Bradley . . 
Brastow ave. 
Bristol road 
Broadway . 
Broadway . 
Broadway . 
Broadway . 
Broadway . 
Broadway . 
Broadway . 
Broadway . 
Broadway pi. 
Bromfield road 
Brook 
Browning road 
Buckingham 
Buena Vista rd. 
Burnside ave. 

Cady av. 
Caldwell ave. 
Calvin . . 
Calvin . . 
Cambria 
Cameron ave. 
Campbell pk. 
Campbell Pk 
Carlton . 
Carver . 
Cedar ave 
Cedar ct. 
Cedar St. pi 
Cedar St. pi 
Cedar 
Central . 
Central . 
Central . 
Centre . 
Chandler 
Chapel . 
Chapel ct. 
Charles . 
Charlestown . 
Charnwood road 
*Chelsea . . 
Cherry . 
Chester . 
Chester ave. . 
Chester ave. . 



Pi 



Cross st. . . 
Broadway . . 
Washington st. 
Medf ord line 
Broadway . 
Broadway 
Highland road 
Pritchard ave. 
Angle in st. south'ly 
Washington st. . 
Prospect Hill av. 
Union sq. 
Wesley sq. 
Washington st 
Cottage ave 
Bow st. 
School st. 
Pearl st. . 
Lowell st. 
Broadway . 
Charlestown line 
Cross st. . 
Marshall st. 
Main st. . 
Top of hill 
Albion st. . 
Willow ave. 
Paulina st, 
Broadway 
Warner st. 
Glen st. . 
Sycamore st. 
Beacon st. 
Holland st. 
Elm st. . 

Simpson ave 
Washington st 
Beacon st. 
Dimick st. 
Central st. 
Holland st. 
Meacham rd 
Kingston st. 
Somerville ave. 
Porter st. . 
Cedar st. . 
Cedar st. . 
Murdock st. 
Cedar n'r Elmst 
Elm st. 

Somerville ave 
Summer st. 
Medford st. 
Albion st. 
Park ave. . 
College ave. 
Sycamore st. 
Washington st. 
Allen st. . 
Willow ave. 
Mystic ave. 
Elm st. 
Elm st. 
Medford St. 
Angle . . 



Walnut st. 
Jaques st. 
Columbus ave. 
Mystic river 
Medford line 
Highland road 
Pritchard ave. 
Easterly to angle in st 
Morrison ave. 
Prospect Hill i 
Walnut st. . 
Wesley sq. . 
Somerville ave. 
Lincoln park 
Elm st. . . 
Northwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Walter st. . 
Porter st. 
Medford line 
Cross st. . . 
Marshall st. 
Main st. . . 
Top of hill . 
Albion st. 
Willow ave. 
Paulina st. . 
Arlington line 
Southwesterly 
Dearborn road 
Cross st. . . 
Central st. . 
Dimick st. 
Arlington Br. R.R 
Summer st. . 

Northwesterly 
Southerly 
Dimick st. . 
Washington st. 
Benton road 
Cambridge line 
Kingston st. 
Arlington Br. R 
Lake st. . . 
Northwesterly 
Linden ave. 
Southeasterly 
Southwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Broadway 
Summer st. . 
Medford st. . 
Broadway 
B. & L. R. R. 
Broadway 
Chandler st. 
Northwesterly 
Southerly 
Easterly . . 
Hancock st. . 
Melrose st. . 
Highland ave. 
Cambridge line 
Angle . . . 
Cross st. . . 



Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 



40 

40 

40 

60 

50 

65 

50 

50 

40 

45 

40 

60 

50 

40 

24 

40 

40 

40 

40 

40 

100 

100 to 200 

100 
100 to 90 

90 
90 to 70 

70 
65-60-65 

22 

40 

40 

40 

40 

30 

40 

40 
20 
40 
30 
40 
60 
40 
20 
40 
40 
22 
15+ 
20 
12+ 
40 
33 
40 
45 
35 
40 
40 
12 
30 
15 
40 
50 
45 
40 
about 22 
20 



1,535 

655 
376 
915 
80 
287 
509 



640 
1,242 
658 
570 
341 



762 
686 

2^590 
2,060 
1,570 
1,030 
2,540 
1,030 
3,250 
3,220 

1,262 
504 
679 
292 

720 



263 
392 

488 

1,065 

399 

'366 



4,137 
1,043 
2,539 
1,079 

1,232 
273 

166 

*589 

1^450 
885 
220 



146 
1,025 



288 
300 
150 



250 



275 



194 
210 



84 

156 
290 

70+ 

220 

80+ 



200 

130 

400 

1,390 

445 



*Proposed. 



346 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



•Street. 



From 



To 



Public 

or 
Private. 



Width 

in 
Feet. 



Length. 



Public. 



Private. 



Chester pi.. 
Chestnut . 
Chetwynd rd. 
Church . . 
City road . 
Claremon . 
Clarendon av< 
Clark . . . 
Cleveland . 
Clifton . . 
Clifton . . 
Clyde . . 
College ave. 
Columbia . 
Columbia ct. 
Columbus ave 
Concord ave. 
Concord ave. 
Congress pi. 
Conlon ct. . 
Conwell ave. 
Conwell . . 
Cooney . . 
Corinthian rd. 
Cottage ave- 
Cottage circle 
Cottage pi. 
Craigie . . 
Craigie ter. 
Crescent 
Crocker . . 
Cross . . 
Cross 

Cross St. pi. 
Crown . . 
Curtis ave. 
Curtis 
Cutler . . 
Cutter ave. 
Cutter pk. . 
Cutter . . 
Cypress 

Dana . . . 
Dane . . . 
Dane ave. . 
Dante terrace 
Dartmouth 
Day . . . 
Dearborn road 
Delaware . 
Dell . . . 
Derby . 
Derby . . 
Dexter . . 
Dickinson . 
Dickson . . 
Dimick . . 
Distillhouse 
Dix pi. . . 
Dover . 
Dow . . . 
Downer pi. 
Downer . . 
Dresden circle 
Durham . . 
Dynamo . . 



Chester st. 
Poplar St. 
Curtis st. . 
Summer st. 
Broadway 
Holland st. 
Broadway . 
Newton st. 
Central st. 
Appleton st. 
Morrison ave 
Cedar st. . 
Davis sq. . 
Webster ave. 
Columbia st. 
Washington st 
Prospect st. 
Wyatt st. . 
Linwood st. 
Columbia st 
Curtis st. . 
Highland ave 
Beacon st. 
Broadway. 
Russell st. 
Cottage ave 
Washington st. 
Somerville ave 
16 Craigie st. 
Washington st 
Highland ave. 
Medford st. 
Broadway 
Cross st. . 
Porter st. . 
Curtis st. . 
Broadway 
Lawrence st 
Summer st. 
Cutter ave. 
Broadway 
Central st. 



ave 



Bonair st. 
Somerville 
Dane st. . 
Craigie st. 
Medford st. 
Elm st. 
Boston ave. 
Aldrich st. 
Glen st. 
Temple st. 
Grant st. . 
Broadway 
Springfield st 
Broadway . 
Concord ave. 
South st. . 
Linwood st. 
Elm st. . 
PowderHouseBd 
Downer st. 
Nashua st. 
Cutter ave. 
Beacon st. 
Willow ave 



Northwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Proposed st. 
Lake st. . . 
Cedar st. 
Mead st. . . 
Cambridge line 
Lincoln parkway 
Harvard st. . 
Morrison ave 
Arlington Br. R 
Murdock st. 
Medford line 
Cambridge line 
Webster ave. 
Walnut st. . 
Wyatt st. 
Beacon st. . 
Somerville ave 
Easterly . . 
North st. 
Southwesterly 
Line st. . . 
Cady ave. . . 
Chester st. . 
Southwesterly 
Northwesterly 
Summer st. . 
Westerly . 
Pearl st. . . 
Crown st. 
Broadway . 
Mystic ave. . 
Northwesterly 
Lowell st. 
Proposed st. 
Medford line 
Northwesterly 
Highland ave. 
Northwesterly 
Webster st. . 
Beech st. 

Pearl st. . . 
Washington st. 
Leland st. 
Westerly . . 
Broadway 
Cambridge line 
College ave. 
Pearl st. . . 
Tufts st. . . 
Grant st. 
Wheatland st. 
Medford line 
Beacon st. 
Fairmount ave. 
Calvin st. 
Cambridge line 
Southwesterly 
Cambridge line 
Ware st. . . 
B. & L. R. R. 
Southeasterly 
Westerly . . 
Hanson st. . 
Whipple st. . 



Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 



40 




40 


537 


40 




40 


964 


45 


• . • 


40 


560 


40 


1,217 


35 




40 


459 


40 


200 


40 




30 




60 


4,080 


40 


816 


9 


.... 


40 


1,425 


40 


1,483 


30 


472 


50 


202 


20 




40 




35 


363 


30 




40 




40 


550 


25 




about 11 




50 


1,280 


25 




30 to 38 


. 


40 


528 


45 


2,680 


40 


1,100 


24 




30 




40 


.... 


40 


2,357 


20 




40 


480 


12 




40 


730 


40 


262 


40 


696 


40 


1,341 


30 


569 


25 




40 


1,465 


40 


908 


50 




40 


451 


40 


466 


40 


831 


40 




50 




40 


770 


40 




40 


957 


35 




10 




40 


975 


40 




20 




20 




30 




40 


423 


30 





200 
656 
980 

545 



220 
600 



150 



200 
1,349 

220 
640 

*87 
150 

126 
650 



150 
700 
654 

170 

83 



125 
460 



200 
25 

271 

150 
100 

257 
125 
120 
133 

*255 



CITY ENGINEEK. 



347 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street. 



From 



To 



Public 

or 
Private. 



Width 

in 
Feet. 



Length. 



Public. Private. 



Earle . . 
East Albion 
East Albion 
Eastman road 
*Edgeworth 
Edmands . 
Edmonton ave 
Electric ave. 
Eliot . . . 
Ellington road 
Ellington road 
Ellsworth . 
Elm ct. . . 
Elm pi. . . 
Elm . . . 
Elm . . . 
Elm . . . 
Elm . . . 
Elm . . . 
Elm . . . 
Elmwood . 
Elmwood ter, 
Elston . . 
Emerson 
Emery . 
Endicott ave. 
Essex . . 
Eustis . . 
Everett ave. 
Everett . . 
Evergreen ave 
Evergreen sq. 
Exchange pi 

Fairlee , . 
Fairmount ave 
Fairview ter. 
Farragut ave. 
tFellsway . . 
tFellsway east 

(Winthrop ave 
tFellsway west 

(Chauncey ave 
Fenwick 
Fisk ave. 
Fitchburg ct 
Fitchburg 
Flint ave. 
Flint . . 
Florence 
Florence ter. 
Forest . 
Forster . 
Fosket . 
Fountain ave. 
Francesca ave 
Francis . . 
Franklin ave. 
Franklin pi. 
Franklin 
Frederick ave, 
Fremont ave. 
Fremont 
Fremont 

Garden ct. 



South st. . . . 
Mt. Vernon ave. 
E. of Moreland st 
Highland ave 
Mystic ave. 
Broadway 
Cross st. . 
Curtis st. . . 
Vine st. 
Highland ave 
West st. . 
Cross st. . 
Villa ave. . 
Harvard st. 
Somerville ave 
Cherry st. 
White st. . 
Banks st. . 
Beech st. . 
Tenney st. 
Holland st. 
Elmwood st 
Elm st. . 
Everett st. 
Fitchburg R. 
Broadway 
Medford st. 
Beacon st. 
Cross st. . 
Webster ave. 
Marshall st. 
Porter st. 
Washington st. 

Cherry st. 
Curtis st. . . 
Sycamore st. . 
Broadway 
Mystic ave. . 

Broadway . . 

Broadway . . 
Broadway 
Hinckley st. 
Fitchburg st. 
Linwood st. . 
Flint st. . . 
Franklin st. . 
Washington st. 
Jaques st. 
Beacon st. 
Sycamore st. 
Willow ave. . 
Cross st. . . 
College ave. 
Porter st. . . 
Washington st. 
Franklin st. . 
Broadway 
Willow ave. . 
Bowdoin st. . 
Main st. . . 
Meacham st. . 

Somerville ave. 



Fitchburg R. R. 
E. of Moreland st 
Medford line. 
Southwesterly 
Melrose st. . 
near Bonair st. 
Fellsway east 
Packard ave. 
Park st. . . 
Northeasterly 
Northwesterly 
Rush st. . . 
Northwesterly 
Westerly . . 
Cherry st. . 
White st. 
Banks st. 
Beech st. 
Tenney st. . 
Davis sq. 
Cambridge line 
Easterly . . 
Summer st. . 
Newton st. . 
South st. 
Woodstock st.(Ext'n) 
Richdale ave. 
Cambridge line 
Dana st. . . 
Newton st. . 
Sycamore st. 
Southeasterly 
Southerly 

Northwesterly 
Northwesterly 
Southwesterly 
Woodstock st.(Ext'n) 
Mystic river 

Mystic ave. . . 

Mystic ave. . . 
Jaques st. 
Lowell st. 
Southeasterly . 
B. & L. R. R. . 
Northerly . . 
Aldrich st. . . 
Perkins st. . . 
Southwesterly . 
Cambridge line 
Central st. . . 
Liberty ave. 
Glen st. . . . 
Liberty ave. 
Conwell st. . 
Franklin st. . . 
Southeasterly . 
Washington st 
Boston ave. 
Lincoln pk. 
Meacham st. 
Near Mystic ave. 

Fitchburg R. R. 



Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private . 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 



30 




25 




40 




40 


296 


50 




40 


376 


40 




40 


681 


40 


291 


35 




30 




40 


230 


18 




30 




63 


1,672 


63 to 60 


330 


60 


660 


60 to 77.5 


290 


77.5 to 60 


570 


60 


1,429 


40 


1,057 


20 




40 


396 


30 




30 




40 




40 


232 


30 




40 


845 


30 




40 


1,320 


8 




4.5 




30 


144 


40 


.... 


15 




40 


905 


70 to 130 


2,500 


50 


1,222 


50 


1,324 


40 


601 


20 and 25 


.... 


10 




40 




40 




40 


1,790 


40 


1,304 


20 




40 


117 


30 




40 


668 


30 


578 


40 


762 


30 


180 


20 


575 


15 




40+ 


2,316 


40 




3'> 


232 


40 


612 


40 




25 





322 
188 
490 

1380 

630 



120 

405 

"70 

190 



190 

170 
335 
800 

150 

*350 

'266 
70 



700 
173 



460 
225 
400 
200 



90 
430 



100 
217 

785 
370 



^Proposed. 



t Metropolitan Park Commission Boulevard. 



34S 



ANNUAL KEPOKTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 













Length. 


Street. 


From 


To 


Public 


Width 






or 


in 












Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private 


Garfield ave. . . 


Broadway . . 


Middlesex ave. 


Private. 


40 




1,430 


Garrison ave. . 




Broadway . . 


Woodstock st. (Ext V 


Private. 


40 


.... 


85C 


George . . . 




Broadway . . 


Lincoln ave. 


Public. 


30 


275 




Gibbens . . 




Central st. . . 


Benton road . . . 


Public. 


40 


492 




Gibbens 




Benton rd. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


40 




i33 


Giles pk. . . 




Walnut st. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Public. 


32.71 


io7 


. . . . 


Gill's ct. . . 




Franklin st. . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


10 




10c 


Gilman . . . 




Cross st. . . . 


Walnut st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,430 




Gilman ter. 




Pearl st. . . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Public. 


40 


360 




Gilson ter. 




Linden ave. . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 


.... 


'i24 


Glen .... 




Broadway . . . 


Tufts st 


Public. 


40 


2,373 





Glendale ave. 




Cameron ave. 


Yorktown st. . . 


Public. 


40 


410 




Glenwood roac 


'. 


Vernon st. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,524 




Glover circle 




Meacham road . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




iic 


Gorham . . 




Holland st. . . 


Howard st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


'763 




Gould ave. . 




Porter st. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


16 


.... 


156 


Gove ct. . . 




Cedar st. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


15 




145 


Grand View a\ 


e. 


Walnut st. . . 


Vinal ave. . . . 


Public. 


40 


'542 




Granite . . 




Somerville ave. 


Osgood st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


411 


• • • • 


Grant . . 




Broadway . . . 


Mystic ave. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,405 




Greene . 




Summer st. . 


Laurel st. ... 


Public. 


40 


555 




Greenville . 




Medford st. . . 


Munroe st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


660 




Greenville ter. 




Greenville st. 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


20 




'250 


Greenwood ter 




Beacon st. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


25 




165 


Grove . . 




Elm st. . . . 


Morrison ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


'996 




Hadley ct. . 




Franklin st. . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


20 


.... 


150 


Hall ave. . 




College ave. . . 


Liberty ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


926 




Hall . . . 




Cedar st. . . 


Cherry st. ... 


Public. 


30 


456 


. . . . 


Hamlet . . 




Highland ave. . 


Boston st. . . . 


Public. 


30 


616 


. . . . 


Hammond . 




Dickinson st. 


Concord ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


267 


• . . . 


Hancock 




Elm st. ... 


Highland ave. . 


Public. 


40 


1,349 


. . . > 


Hancock 




Highland ave. . 


Lexington ave. 


Public. 


50 


376 


. . . . 


Hanson ave. 




Hanson st. 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


30 




252 


Hanson . . 




Washington st. . 


Skehan st. . . . 


Public. 


30 


469 




Hanson 




Skehan st. . . 


Vine st 


Public. 


35 


347 




Harding 




South st. . . . 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


30 




115 


Harold . . 




Dimick st. . . 


Marion st. . . . 


Private. 


40 




317 


Harrison 




Ivaloo st. . . . 


Kent st 


Public. 


40 


'644 




Harrison 




Elmwood st. 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


40 


.... 


'210 


Harvard pi. 




Harvard st. . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


35 


.... 


200 


Harvard 




Summer st. . 


Beech st 


Public. 


40 


717 




Hathorn 




Broadway . . 


Arlington st. . . 


Public. 


40 


339 




Hawkins 




Somerville ave. . 


Washington st. 


Public. 


40 


330 




Hawthorne 




Willow ave. . 


Cutter ave. . . . 


Public. 


30 


807 




Hayden ter. 




Linden ave. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


20 




120 


Heath . . 




Temple st. . . 


Bond st 


Public. 


45 


1,043 


.... 


Heath . . 




Bond st. . . . 


Mt. Vernon ave. . 


Private. 


40 


.... 


386 


Heath . . 




Mt. Vernon ave. 


Moreland st. . . 


Public. 


40 


364 




Henderson 




Richardson st. . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


20 




535 


Hennessy ct. 




Medford st. . . 


Fisk ave. . . . 


Private. 


20 


.... 


250 


Henrietta ct. 




Somerville ave. . 


Northerly . . 


Private. 


8 and 20. 


.... 


161 


Henry ave. 




Highland ave. . 


Lexington ave. 


Public. 


40 


290 




Herbert . . 




Chester st. . . 


Day st. . . 


Public. 


40 


337 




Hersey . . 




Berkeley st. . . 


Oxford st. . . . 


Private. 


40 




230 


Highland ave. 


Medford st. . . 


Davis sq. ... 


Public. 


60 


9,135 




Highland p'th, east 


Morrison ave. . 


Arlington Br. R R. 


Private. 


10 




107 


Highland p'th.wesl 


Morrison ave. 


Arlington Br. R.R. 


Private. 


10 




108 


♦Highland road . 


Morrison ave. 


Boston ave. . . 


Public. 


30(70wide) 


1^499 




Hill 


Broadway . . 


Fair mount ave. 


Private. 


40 




236 


Hillside ave. 




Pearl st. ' . . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


30 




150 


Hillside cir. 




Craigie st. . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


16 




151 


Hillside pk. 




Walnut st. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Public. 


40 


i96 




Hinckley . 




Broadway . . 


Richardson St. . . 


Public. 


30 and 35 


579 




Hodgdon pi. 




Dane ave. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


about 20 





150 



♦Roadway (only) accepted 30 feet wide, full width of street 70 feet. 



CITY ENGLNEEK. 



349 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street. 



From 



To 



Public 

or 
Private. 



Width 

in 
Feet. 



Length. 



Public. Private. 



Holland . . 
Holt's ave. 
Holyoke road 
Homer sq, 
Horace . 
Houghton 
Howard 
Howe . 
Hudson. 
Hunting 

Ibbetson 
Irving 
Ivaloo . 

James 
Jaques . 
Jaques . 
Jasper pi. 
Jasper . 
Jay • • 
Jerome ct. 
Jerome . 
Jerome . 
Joseph . 
Josephine ave 
Joy . . 
Joy St. pi. 



Kenneson road 
Kensington ave. 
*Kensington ave 
Kent ct. 
Kent . . . 
Kent . . . 
Kenwood . 
Kidder ave. 
Kilby . . 
Kimball . 
Kingman road 
Kingston . 
Knapp . . 
Knowlton . 
Knowlton . 

Lake . . . 
Lamson ct 
Landers . . 
Latin Way . 
Laurel ave. 
Laurel . . 
Lawrence . 
Lawrence rd. 
Lawson ter. 
Lee . . . 
Leland . . 
Leon . . . 
Leonard pi. 
Leonard st. 
Lesley ave. 
Leslie pi. . 
Lester ter. . 
Lexington ave 
Lexington ave 
Lexington ave 
Liberty ave. 
Liberty ave. 



Davis sq. . 
Oak st. 
Elm st. 
Bonner ave. 
South st. . 
Springfield st 
Thorndike st. 
Marshall st. 
Central st. 
South st. . 



Somerville ave. 
Holland st. . 
Beacon st. 

Pearl st. . . 
Fellsway west 
Temple st. 
Walnut st. 
Pearl st. . . 
Holland st. . 
Sycamore st. 
Montrose st. 
Lawrence rd. 
Newton st. 
Morrison ave. 
Washington st. 
Joy st. . . 

Broadway 
Broadway . . 
Blakeley ave. 
Kent st. . . 
Somerville ave. 
Fitchburg R. R 
College ave. . 
College ave. . 
Somerville ave. 
Lowell st. 
Washington st. 
Meacham road 
School st. . . 
Tufts st. . . 
End of above 

Hawkins st. 
Linwood st. 
School st. 
Talbot ave. 
Laurel st. . 
Somerville ave. 
Richardson st 
Medford line 
Putnam st. 
Medford st. . 
Washington st. 
Concord ave. 
Joy st. . . . 
Broadway 
Highland ave. 
Highland ave. 
Meacham road 
Willow ave. 
Hancock st. . 
Angle . . 
Broadway 
Hall ave. . . 



Broadway 
Southeasterly 
Elm st. . . 
Northwesterly 
Fitchburg R. R 
Cambridge line 
Gorham street 
School st. 
Cedar st. . . 
Cambridge line 

Lowell st. . 
Broadway 
Park st. . . 

Veazie st. 
Temple st. . 
Bond st. . . 
Easterly . . 
Gilman st. . 
Howard st. . 
Jerome st. . 
Jerome ct. 
Mystic river . 
Lincoln parkway 
Broadway 
Poplar st. 
Southwesterly 

Walnut road 
Blakeley ave. 
Middlesex ave 
Northerly 
Fitchburg R. R 
Beacon st. 
Billingham st. 
Willow ave. 
Southwesterly 
Craigie st. . 
Fitchburg R. R 
Cambridge line 
Granite st. . 
N'E'y line Est. 
Oliver st. 



Church st. 
Poplar st. 
Westerly . . 
Professors row 
Northwesterly 
Summer st. . 
B. & L. R. R. 
Mystic river . 
Easterly . . 
Richdale ave. 
Dane ave. . 
Dickinson st. 
Northeasterly 
Powder House Blvd 
Lexington ave. 
Northerly 
Northwesterly 
Hancock st. . 
Angle 
Cedar st. 
Hall ave. 
Appleton st. 



37 



Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 
Public. 
Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 



60 

10 

40 

30+ 

30 

40 

40 

40 

40 

30 

40 
40 
40 

40 
40 
45 
20 
40 
40 
10 
20 
40 
40 
45 
30 
30 

30 
40 
40 
about 25 
40 
25 
40 
40 
20 
40 
25 
40 
40 
40 
40 

40 
20 
40 
60 

18 
40 
35 
40 
5 
40 
40 
40 
13+ 
40 
40 
12 
20 
50 
45 to 40 
40 
40 
40 



2.696 

'637 
200 

653 

431 

445 

2,760 



802 

1,180 

685 

320 

1,182 
1,005 

'283 
534 



458 
1,718 
1,121 



455 



292 

386 

322 

1,329 



647 
379 
461 



840 

983 

'385 
*155 

333 



100 
'510 

'i-25 



80 



150 
125 

742 



175 

338 

1,150 

420 



180 
303 
400 



464 



370 
280 
250 
125 

'500 
820 
200 

'365 

'"98 
445 



.... 


75 


.... 


190 


624 


.... 


147 


.... 


578 


.... 


1,395 




98 





♦Proposed. 



350 



ANNUAL HEPOETg. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Public and 



Street. 



From 



To 



Public 

or 
Private. 



Width 

in 
Feet. 



Length. 



Public. Private. 



Liberty rd. 
Lincoln ave. . 
Lincoln parkway 
Lincoln pi. 
Lincoln . . . 
Linden ave. 
Linden ave. 
Linden circle . 
Linden pi. . . 
Linden . . 
Line .... 
Linehan ct. 
Lin wood pi. 
Linwood 
London . 
Loring . 
Louisburg pi. 
Lovell . . 
Lowden ave. 
Lowell . . 
Lowell . . 
Lowell . . 
Lowell ter. 

Madison 
Main . . " 
*Malden . 
Mallet . . 
Malloy ct. . 
Malvern ave. 
Manila road 
Mansfield . 
Maple ave. 
Maple pi. . 
Maple . . 
Mardell circle 
Marion . 
Marshall 
Mason . 
May pi. . . 
McCulphe pi. 
McGregor ave 
Meachatn road 
Meacham 
Mead 
Medford 
Medford 
Melrose 
Melvin . . 
Merriam ave. 
Merriam . 
Middlesex ave 
Milk pi. . 
Miller . . 
Milton . . 
Miner . . 
Mondamin ct 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Montgomery ave 
Montrose ct 
Montrose 
Moore . 
Moreland 
Morgan . 
Morrison av 
Morrison ave 
Morrison pi. 



Morrison ave. 
Lincoln st. . 
Washington st. 
Lincoln ave. 
Broadway. 
Elm st. . . . 
Summer st. . 
Linden ave. . 
Linden ave. . 
Somerville ave. 
Washington st. 
Linwood st. . 
Linwood st. . 
Somerville ave. 
Linwood st. . 
Somerville ave. 
Autumn st. . 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Somerville ave. 
Summer st. . 
Crown st. 
Lowell st. 

School st. . . 
Broadway 
Mystic ave. . 
Willow ave. . 
Somerville ave 
Cameron ave. 
Beacon st. 
Somerville ave 
School st. 
Marshall st. . 
Poplar st. 
Spring st. 
Concord ave. 
Broadway 
Broadway . . 
Hawkins st. . 
Medford st. . 
Wigglesworth st 
Dover st. 
Mt. Vernon ave 
Cameron ave. 
Cambridge line 
Central st. 
Mystic ave. . 
Broadway 
Merriam st. . 
Somerville ave 
Mystic ave. . 
Somerville ave 
Sacramento st. 
Orchard st. . 
Vernon st. 
Ivaloo st. 
Central st. 
End of above 
Broadway . , 
Montrose st. 
School st. 
Holland st. . 
Main st. . . 
Beacon st. 
Cedar st. . . 
Willow ave. . 
Morrison ave. 



Libert}' ave. 
Mt. Vernon st. 
Perry st. 
Northerly 
Perkins st. . 
Summer st. . 
Northeasterly 
Southeasterly 
Northwesterly 
Charlestown st. 
Cambridge line 
Chestnut st. 
Southwesterly 
Washington st. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Osgood st. . 
Easterly . . 
Electric ave. 
Fosket st. 
Summer st. . 
Crown st. 
Medford st. . 
Northwesterly 

Sycamore st. 
Medford line 
Melrose st. . 
Liberty ave. 
Merriam ave. 
Yorktown st. 
Sacramento st. 
Washington st. 
Southeasterly 
Maple ave. . 
Medford st. . 
Northwesterly 
Dimick st. 
Pearl st. . 
Powder House Blvd 
Easterly . . 
Easterly . . 
Walnut st. . 
Cambridge line 
Medford line 
Moore st. 
Central St. . 
Broadway 
Fellsway 
Bonair st. 
Malloy ct. . 
Charlestown st 
Fellsway . 
Southwesterly 
Beacon st. . 
Cambridge line 
Ames st. 
Harrison st. 
Westerly . . 
Harvard st. . 
Wellington ave 
B. & L. R.R. 
Sycamore st. 
Mead st. 
Mvstic ave. 
Park st. . . 
Willow ave. . 
College ave. 
Northerly 



Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 



16 
30 
40 

9 

40 
45 
45 

24 

20 

33 

30 
about 15 
about 12 

50 

40 

40 

13 

40 

40 

36 

33+ 

40 

20 

40 
50 
50 
40 
30 
40 
40 
40 
40 

5 
30 

S 
40 
40 

12" 
10 
13 
40 
40 
40 
50 
55 
50 
40 
15 
30 
60 
about 30 
33 
40 
40 
25 
40 
35 
40 
12 
40 
40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
20 



478 
1,520 

550 
1,083 



587 
1,727 



2,114 
413 



1,247 
1,259 

3^121 



891 
966 



410 
735 

699 



200 



120 



250 
120 
16U 



200 
150 

340 

90 

385 



349 
150 



1,360 
657 

255 

408 

300 
125 

140 



1,141 


.... 


1,650 


.... 




683 




100 




110 




302 


1,060 






800 




340 


8,047 




1,985 






2,310 


487 






255 




510 


2,304 


.... 


.... 


100 




465 


223 


* . * 


244 


.... 


.... 


250 


267 


■ • - 




200 


265 






iio 


886 


.... 


695 


.... 


1,471 


.... 


377 


.... 


1,366 




1,690 


.... 



190 



♦Proposed. 



CITY ENGINEEK. 



351 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 













Length. 








Public 


Width 






Street. 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


Morrison pi. . . 


Morrison pi. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


15 




175 


Mortimer pi. . . 


Marshall st. . . 


Walter st. ... 


Private. 


20 




280 


Morton .... 


Glen st. ... 


Knowlton st. . . 


Public. 


40 


*287 


.... 


M >ssland . . . 


Somerville ave. . 


Elm st 


Public. 


40 


377 




Mountain ave. 


Linden ave. . . 


Porter st. ... 


Private. 


22 




'316 


Mousal pi. . . . 


North Union st. 


B. & M. R. R. . 


Private. 


20 




200 


Mt. Pleasant ct. 


Perkins st. . . 


Southwesterly . 


Private. 


40 




200 


Mt. Pleasant . . 


Broadway . . . 


Perkins st. . . . 


Public. 


33 


584 




Mt. Vernon ave. . 


Main st. . . . 


Meacham st. . . 


Private. 


50 




800 


•Mt. Vernon ave. 


Meacham st. 


Mystic ave. . . 


Private 


50 




764 


Mt. Vernon . . 


Washington st. . 


Pearl st 


Public. 


40 


*600 




Mt. Vernon . . 


Pearl st. . . . 


Perkins st. . . . 


Public. 


50 


473 




Mt. Vernon . . 


Perkins st. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


40 


590 




Munroe .... 


Walnut st. . . 


Easterly .... 


Public. 


40 


375 




Munroe .... 


End of above 


Boston st. . . . 


Public. 


50 


1,214 




Murdock . . . 


Cedar st. . . . 


Clyde st. ... 


Private. 


30 




'966 


Murray .... 


Washington st. . 


Southerly . . . 


Private. 


30 




250 


Museum . . . 


Beacon st. . . 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


164 




Myrtle ct. . . . 


Myrtle st. . . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


10 




'ioo 


Myrtle pi. . . . 


Myrtle st. . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


20+ 




120 


Myrtle .... 


Washington st. . 


Perkins st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


l',423 


— 


Mystic ave. . . 


Charlestown line 


Union st. ... 


Public. 


60 


378 


.... 


t Mystic ave. . . 


Union st. . . . 


Medford line . . 


Public. 


66 


6,938 


— 


Mystic .... 


Washington st. . 


Somerville ave. 


Public. 


40 


360 


— 


Mystic .... 


Benedict st. . . 


Mystic ave. . . . 


Public. 


40 


336 




**Mystic riv. blvd. 


Medford line . . 


Arlington line . . 


Private. 


60 




2,000 


Nashua .... 


Richardson st. . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Public. 


35 


637 




Nevada ave. . . 


Village st. . . 


Hanson st. . . . 


Private. 


20 




"266 


Newberne . . . 


Appleton st. . . 


Morrison ave. . 


Public. 


40 


'266 




Newberne . . . 


Morrison ave. . 


Arlington Br. R R. 


Private. 


40 




173 


Newbury park 


Newbury st. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


i Private. 


55 




68 


Newbury . . . 


Holland st. . . 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


1*260 




Newman pi. . . 


Cedar st. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


15 


.... 


'ioo 


Newton pi. . . 


Newton st. . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


about 10 




100 


Newton .... 


Prospect st. . . 


Webster ave. . . 


Public. 


25 


'47O 




Newton .... 


Webster ave. 


Concord ave. 


Public. 


40+ 


637 




Norfolk .... 


Webster ave. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


283 




North .... 


Broadway . . . 


Medford'line b.17 


Public. 


40 


1,961 




North . _ . . . 


Medford line b. 17 


Medford line b. 18 


Public. 


37 to 42 


649 




North Union . . 


Mystic ave. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


30 




'600 


Norton .... 


Nashua st. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




200 


Norwood ave. 


Broadway . . . 


Medford st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


350 




Oak 


Prospect st. . . 


Angle 


Public. 


40 


665 




Oak 


Angle .... 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


30 


563 




Oak St. pi. . . . 


Oak st. ... 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


4 




85 


Oakland ave. . . 


Marshall st. . . 


School st. ... 


Public. 


40 


'446 




Olive ave. . . . 


Linden ave. . . 


Peterson ter. . . 


Private. 


25 




155 


Olive sq. . . . 


Lake st. . . . 


Southerly . . 


Private. 


about 15 




100 


Oliver .... 


Franklin st. . . 


Cross st. ... 


Public. 


40 


1,085 




Orchard .... 


Cambridge line . 


Meacham road . . 


Public. 


40 


1,567 




Osgood .... 


Granite st. . . 


Easterly & west'ly 


Private. 


40 




450 


Ossipee road . . 


Packard ave. 


Curtis st. ... 


Public. 


40 


682 




Ossipee rd. (east) 


Packard ave. 


Proposed st. . . 


Private. 


40 




633 


Otis 


Cross st. . . 


Wigglesworth st. . 


Public. 


40 


1*200 


.... 


Oxford .... 


School st. . . . 


Central st. . . . 


Public. 


35 


1,361 


.... 


Oxford .... 


Beacon st. . . 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


50 


100 




Packard ave. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Professors row . 


Public. 


60 


1,758 


. . . • 


Packard ave. . . 


Professors row . 


Medford line . . 


Private. 


60 




242 


Palmer ave. . . 


Franklin st. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




200 


Park ave. . . . 


College ave. . . 


Wallace st . . . 


Public. 


40 


'467 




Park pi. ... 


Laurel st. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


30 




220 


Park pi. . . . 


Park pi. . . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




150 


Park 


Somerville ave. 


Beacon st. . . . 


Public. 


50 


l',238 





♦Proposed. 

**Proposed Metropolitan Park Commission Boulevard. 

1 State Highway Austin St. to Medford line. 



352 



ANNUAL EEPOETg. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 













Length. 


• Street. 


From 


To 


Public 


Width 






or 


in 












Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


Parker pi. . . . 


Porter st. . . . 


Northwesterly , . 


Private. 


20 




150 


Parker .... 


Washington st. . 


Fremont ave. . . 


Public. 


35 


203 


.... 


Partridge ave. 


Vernon st. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,467 


.... 


Patten ct. . . . 


Cutter st. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


8 


.... 


100 


Paulina .... 


Broadway . . . 


Holland st. . . . 


Private. 


40 




775 


Pearl 


Crescent st. . . 


Mt. Vernon st. 


Public. 


37 


'341 




Pearl 


Mt. Vernon st. . 


Franklin st. . . 


Public. 


50 


957 




Pearl 


Franklin st. . . 


Cross st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,060 




Pearl 


Cross st. . . . 


Medford st. . . 


Public. 


50 


2,447 




Pearl St. pi. . . 


Pearl st. . . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




200 


Pearl ter. . . . 


Pearl st. . . . 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


23 




161 


Pearson ave. . . 


Morrison ave. . 


Boston ave. . . 


Public. 


45 


1,320 


.... 


Pearson road . . 


Broadway . . . 


Warner st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


564 


.... 


Pearson road . . 


Warner st. . . 


Dearborn road . 


Private. 


40 




1,090 


Pembroke ct. 


Pembroke St. 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


25 




130 


Pembroke . 


Central st. . . 


Sycamore st. . . 


Public. 


40 


430 


.... 


Perkins pi. . . . 


Perkins st. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




200 


Perkins .... 


Franklin st. . . 


Charlestown line . 


Public. 


40 


1,336 





Perry .... 


Washington st. . 


Lincoln parkway . 


Public. 


40 


606 




Peterson ter. . . 


Porter st. . . . 


Olive ave. . . 


Private. 


13+ 


.... 


155 


Pinckney pi. . . 


Pinckney st. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


24 





125 


Pinckney . . . 


Washington st. . 


Perkins st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,186 




Piper ave. . . . 


Cedar st. . . . 


Westerly. . . . 


Private. 


20 




461 


Pitman .... 


Beech st. . . . 


Spring st. ... 


Private. 


30 




380 


Pitman .... 


Spring st. . . . 


Belmont st. . . . 


Private. 


26 




390 


Pleasant ave. 


Walnut st. . . 


Vinal ave. . . . 


Public. 


40 


543 




Poplar ct. . . . 


Poplar st. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


10 




80 


Poplar .... 


Somerville ave. 


Linwood st. . . 


Public. 


30 


351 


.... 


Poplar .... 


Linwood st. . . 


Joy st 


Public. 


35 


315 




Poplar .... 


Joy st 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


35 




65 


Porter ave. . . 


Porter st. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




220 


Porter pi. . . . 


Porter st. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




195 


Porter .... 


Elm st. ... 


Mountain ave. 


Public. 


45 


1,622 




Porter .... 


Mountain ave. . 


Highland ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


415 





Powder house 


Powder house 


Northwesterly, 










boulevard . . 


square . . . 


Mystic river and 














Medford line 


Public. 


80 


7,200 




Powder house ter. 


Kidder ave. . . 


Liberty ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


585 




Prentiss . ■ . 


Beacon st. . . 


Cambridge Line . 


Private. 


35 




150 


Prescott . . . 


Summer st. . . 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


50 


l'iio 




Preston road . . 


School st. . . 


Summer st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


839 




Princeton . . . 


Alpine st. . . 


Lowell st. . . . 


Private 


40 


648 




Princeton . . . 


Lowell st. . . 


Centre st. . . . 


Private. 


40 




540 


Pritchard ave. 


Morrison ave. . 


Frederick ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


*634 




Pritchard ave. 


Frederick ave. . 


Boston ave. . . . 


Private. 


40 




511 


Professors row . 


College ave. . . 


Curtis st. ... 


Public. 


40 


2^666 




Proposed st. . . 


Con well ave. 


Sunset rd. . . . 


Private. 


40 




*632 


Prospect . . . 


Washington st. . 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


50 


2,071 




Prospect Hill av. 


Medford st. . . 


Munroe st. . 


Public. 


40 


597 




Prospect Hill p'k'y 


Munroe st. . . 


Stone ave. . . . 


Public. 


40 


400 




Prospect pi. . . 


Prospect st. . . 


Newton st. . . . 


Private. 


20 




130 


Putnam .... 


Summer st. . . 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


50 


l',262 


.... 


Quincy .... 


Somerville ave. 


Summer st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


781 





Randolph pi. . . 


Cross st. . . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


15 




244 


Raymond ave. 


Curtis st. . . . 


North st. ... 


Public. 


40 


1,345- 




Record ct.. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


10 




iib 


Reed's ct. . . . 


Oliver st. . . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




105 


Remick ct. . . 


Cutter st. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


10 




100 


Richardson . . 


Lowell st. . . 


Lawrence st. 


Public. 


35 


*467 


.... 


Richardson ter. . 


Richardson st. . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




135 


Richdale ave. 


School st. . . 


Sycamore st. . . 


Public. 


40 


"875 




Richmond hi'l'ds ] 


Madison st. . . 


Southerly 146' . . 


Private. 


30 




*146 


Madison st. s'lyl46 


Highland ave. . . 


Private. 


10 


.... 


140 


Roberts .... 


Lawrence st. 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




170 


Robinson . . . 


Central st. . . 


Bartlett st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


582 




Rogers ave. . . 


Morrison ave. . 


Boston ave. . . . 


Public. 


45 


1,682 





CITY ENGIKEEK. 



353 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets.— Continued. 













LBNfiTH. 








Public 


Width 






Street. 


From 


To 


or 


in 
















Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


Roland st. . . . 


Waverly st. . . 


Boston line . . . 


Private. 


40 




100 


Roseland . . . 


Beacon st. . . 


Cambridge line . 


Public. 


40 


'121 


.... 


Rossmore . . . 


Somerville ave. 


Washington st. 


Public. 


40 


534 


.... 


Royce pi. . . . 


Bonair st. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


15+ 




175 


Rush ...... 


Broadway . . . 


Flint st 


Public. 


40 


1,466 


.... 


Russell road . 


Broadwav . . . 


North st 


Private. 


40 




1,193 


Russell .... 


Elm st. ... 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


TOO 


.... 


Sacramento . . 


Somerville ave. 


Fitchburg R. R. . 


Public. 


40 


80 




Sacramento . . 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Beacon st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


290 




Sacramento . . 


Beacon st. . . 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


40 




156 


Sanborn ave. . . 


Warren ave. . . 


Walnut st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


*280 




Sanborn ct. . . 


Washington st. 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


30 




*i76 


Sargent ave. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Walnut st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,075 


.... 


Sartwell ave. . . 


Cedar st. . . . 


Cherry st. . . . 


Private. 


35 




400 


Sawyer ave. . . 


Packard ave. 


Curtis st. ... 


Private. 


40 




690 


School .... 


Somerville ave. 


Highland ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


1,901 


.... 


School .... 


Highland ave. . 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


50 


2,500 


.... 


Sellon pi. . . . 


Marshall st. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


12 




120 


Seven Pines ave . 


Cameron ave. . 


Cambridge line . 


Public. 


40 


"92 


.... 


Sewall ct. . . . 


Sewall st. . . . 


Southwesterly . 


Private. 


25 




190 


Sewall .... 


Grant st. . . . 


Temple st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


615 


.... 


Shawmut pi. . . 


Shawmut st. 


Alston st. . . ■ 


Private. 


30 




200 


Shawmut . . . 


Washington st. . 


Cross st. ... 


Public. 


40 


575 




Shedd .... 


Somerville ave. 


Merriam ave. . . 


Private. 


40 


.... 


810 


Sherman ct. , . 


Sargent ave. . . 


Marshall st. . . 


Private. 


10 




250 


Sibley ct. . . . 


Cutter st. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


10 


... 


100 


Sibley pi. . . . 


Cutter st. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


10 


.... 


10O 


Simpson ave. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Holland st. . . . 


Private. 


40 




825 


Skehan .... 


Dane st. . . . 


Hanson st. . . . 


Public. 


30 


306 




Skehan .... 


Hanson . . . 


Durham .... 


Private. 


30 




'4ii 


Skilton ave. . . 


Pearl st. . . . 


Pearl st 


Private. 


40 


.... 


540 


Smith ave. . . . 


Beacon st. . . 


Line st 


Private. 


25+ 


.... 


200 


Snow pi. ... 


Belmont st. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


30 


.... 


75 


Snow pi. ... 


Snow pi. . . . 


NWly and S'th'ly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


222 


Snow ter. . . . 


Jaques st. . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


16 




120 


Somerville ave. . 


E. Camb. line . 


Union sq. . . . 


Public. 


75 


4,325 




Somerville ave. . 


Union sq. . . 


N. Camb. line . . 


Public. 


70 


6,793 


.... 


South .... 


Medford st. . . 


Water st. ... 


Public. 


30 


989 


.... 


Spencer ave. . . 


Cedar st. . . . 


Hancock st. . . 


Public. 


40 


727 


.... 


Spring ct. . . . 


Somerville ave. 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


20 




200 


Spring .... 


Somerville ave. 


Summer st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1.220 




Springfield . . 


Concord ave. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


788 




Spring Hill ter. . 


Highland ave. . 


Belmont st. . . 


Private. 


20 




670 


Stanford ter. . . 


Beacon st. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




200 


Stickney ave. . . 


Marshall st. . . 


School st. ... 


Public. 


40 


'458 




St. James ave. 


Elm st. ... 


Summer st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


488 




St. James ave. ext. 


Summer st. . 


Northeasterly . 


Private. 


30 




125 


Stone ave. . . . 


Union sq. . . . 


Columbus ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


676 


.... 


Stone ave. . . . 


Columbus ave. . 


Prospect Hill p'k'y 


Public. 


38 


107 




Stone pi. ... 


Stone ave. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


30 




145 


Summer . . 


Bow st. ... 


Elm st 


Public. 


45 


7,900 




Summit ave. . . 


Walnut st. . . 


Vinal ave. . . . 


Public. 


45 


532 


.... 


Summit .... 


College ave. . . 


Billingham st. . . 


Public. 


40 


262 


.... 


Sumner .... 


Lawrence st. 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




175 


Sunnyside ave. 


Walnut st. . . 


Wigglesworth st. . 


Private. 


35 




260 


Sunset rd. . . . 


Curtis st. . . . 


Proposed st. . . 


Private. 


40 




658 


Sycamore . . . 


Broadway . . 


Medford st. . . 


Public. 


45 


1,275 




Sycamore ". . . 


Medford st. . . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Public. 


40 


667 


.... 


Sycamore . . . 


B. & L. R. R. . 


Highland ave. . . 


Public. 


35 


722 




Sydney .... 


Grant st. . . 


Temple st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


679 





Talbot ave. . . 


Packard ave. 


College ave. . . . 


Private. 


50 




1,409 


•Tannery (Ext'n) 


Cambridge line . 


Woodstock st. (Ext'n) 


Private. 


40 




ieo 


Taunton. . . . 


Wyatt st. . . 


Easterly to angle . 


Private. 


30 




170 


Taunton . . . 


Angle .... 


Marion st. . . . 


Private. 


20 


.... 


95 



•Proposed. 



354 



ANNUAL HEPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 













Lbn^th. 








\ Public 


Width 






Street. 


From 


To 




• 






Private. 


in 
Feet. 
















Public. 


Private. 


Taylor pi. . . . 


Somerville ave. 


Southerly . . . 


! 
Private. 


15 




200 


Taylor . . . 




Mystic ave. . . 


Sydney st. . . . 


Private. 


40 




310 


Teele ave. . . 




Packard ave. 


Curtis st. ... 


Private. 


40 




685 


Temple . . . 




Broadway . . 


Mystic ave. . . . 


Public. 


66 


1,637 





Tenney ct. . . 




Mystic ave. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


30 




400 


Tennyson . . 




Forster st. . . 


Pembroke st. . . 


Public. 


40 


922 




Thorn dike . . 




Holland st. . 


Arl'ngt'n Br. R. R. 


Public. 


40 


465 


.... 


Thorhdike . 




Arl'gt'nBr. R.R. 


Kingston st. . . 


Public. 


40 


115 


.... 


Thorpe pi. 




Highland ave. . 


Southwesterly . . 


Public. 


30 


468 




Thurston . . 




Broadway . . 


Richdale ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


1,660 


.... 


Timmins pi. . 




Dane st. . . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


3.5 


.... 


97 


Tower ct. . 




Tyler st. . . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


25 




150 


Tower . . 




Crown st. . . 


Highland ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


559 




Tremont pi. 




Tremont st. . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


about 10 




"75 


Tremont . . 




Webster ave. 


Cambridge line . . 


Public. 


40 


589 




Trull . . . 




Vernon st. . . 


Medford st. . . 


Public. 


40 


1,050 




Trull lane . . 




Highland ave. . 


Oxford st. ... 


Private. 


15 




'266 


Tufts parkway 




College ave. . . 


College ave. . . 


Public. 


22 


'966 




Tufts . . . 




Washington st. . 


Cross st 


Public. 


40 


982 


.... 


Tyler . . 




Vine st. ... 


Dane st 


Public. 


40 


404 





Unnamed st. 




Ware st. . . . 


Powder h'se blvd. 


Private. 


20-40 




283 


Union . . 




Broadway . . 


Mystic ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


345 




Union pi. . 




Linwood st. . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


10 




100 


Upland Park 




Main st. . . . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




175 


Veazie . . 




Walnut st. . . 


Bradley St. . . . 


Public. 


35 


392 




Veazie . . 




Bradley st. . . 


Marshall st. . . 


Public. 


40 


261 




Vernon . . 




Central st. . . 


Glenwood road . 


Public. 


40 


764 


.... 


Vernon . . 




Glenwood road . 


Partridge ave. . . 


Public. 


40 to 30 


190 




Vernon . . 




Partridge ave. . 


Lowell st. ... 


Public. 


30 


434 




Victoria . . 




Broadway . . 


Cambridge line . 


Private. 


40 




1,036 


Villa ave. . 




Winslow ave. . 


Arlington Br. R. R. 


Private. 


35 





200 


Village . . 




Dane st. . . . 


Vine st. . . . . 


Private. 


25 




370 


Vinal ave. . 




Summer st. . . 


Highland ave. . . 


Public. 


45 


1,425 




Vinal . . 




Richardson st. . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




200 


Vine ct. . . 




Vine st. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


25 




140 


Vine . . . 




Somerville ave. 


Hanson st. . . . 


Private. 


40 




780 


Vine . . . 




Hanson st. . . 


Beacon st. . . . 


Public. 


30 


662 


.... 


Virginia . . 




Aldrich st. . . 


Jasper st. ... 


Public. 


40 


405 


.... 


Wade ct. 




Cedar st. . . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


20 




180 


Waldo ave. 




Beacon st. . . 


Dimick st. . . . 


Private. 


40 




277 


Waldo . . 




Highland ave. . 


Hudson st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


287 





Walker st. . 




Broadway . . . 


Leonard st. . 


Private. 


40 





713 


Wallace . . 




Holland st. . . 


Broadway . . 


Public. 


40 


1,342 


.... 


Walnut . . 




Bow st. ... 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


40 


3,948 


'270 


Walnut road 




Walnut st. . . 


Kenneson road 


Private. 


40 




Walter pi. . 




Walter st. . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


40 




222 


Walter . . 




Walnut st. . . 


( about 100 ft. N. ) 
\ of Bradley st. J 


Public. 


40 


548 


>- 


Ward . . 




Medford st. . . 


Emery st. . . . 


Private. 


30 




450 


Ware . . . 




Curtis st. . . . 


Dow st 


Private. 


40 




680 


Warner . . 




Powder House sq 


- Medford line . ' . 


Public. 


60 


500 




Warren ave. 




Union sq. . . 


Columbus ave. 


Public. 


40 


663 





Warren . . 




Medford st. . . 


Cambridge line . 


Public. 


30 to 40 


109 




Warwick place . 


Warwick st. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


15 




150 


Warwick . . . 


Cedar st. . . . 


Warwick pi. . . 


Public. 


40 


665 


.... 


Washington ave. . 


Washington st. . 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


18 




350 


Washington pi. . 


Washington st. . 


Southerly . . . 


Private. 


about 7.5 




114 


Washington . . 


Charlest'n line . 


Franklin ave. . . 


Public. 


75 


1,060 




Washington 




Franklin ave. 


Fitchburg R. R. . 


Public. 


60 to 100 


3,977 




Washington 




Fitchburg R. R. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


60 


2,344 




Water . . 




South st. . . . 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


25 




250 


Waterhouse 




Broadway . . 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


40 





986 


Watson . . 




Broadway . . 


Fairmount ave. 


Private. 


40 




236 


Waverly . . . 


Washington st. . 


Roland st. . . . 


Private. 


35 




200 


Webster ave. . . 


Union sq. . . 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


49.5 


1,955 





CITY ENGINEEE. 



355 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Concluded. 









Public 


Width 


Length. 


Street. 


From. 


To 


or 
Private. 


in 
Feet. 






















Public. 


Private. 


Webster . . . 


Franklin st. . . 


Cross st 


Public. 


40 


1,034 




Wellington ave. . 


Walnut st. . . 


Montgomery ave. 


Public. 


40 


215 


.... 


Wellington ave. . 


Montgomery ave. 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


40 


.... 


85 


Wesley pk. . . 


Wesley sq. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Public. 


40 


405 


.... 


Wesley .... 


Pearl st. . . . 


Otis st 


Public. 


40 


515 


.... 


West 


Broadway . . . 


Heath st. ... 


Private. 


30 


.... 


250 


West 


Hawthorne st. . 


Highland ave. . . 


Public. 


30 


192 


.... 


West 


Highland ave. . 


Arlington Br.R.R. 


Private. 


30 


.... 


266 


Westminster . . 


Broadway . . 


Electric ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


376 


.... 


Weston ave. . . 


Clarendon ave. . 


Broadway . . . 


Private. 


40 


.... 


525 


Westwood road 


Central st. . . 


Benton road . . 


Public. 


40 


489 


.... 


Wheatland . . . 


Broadway . . . 


Mystic ave. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,364 


.... 


Wheeler . . . 


Pinckney st. . . 


Mt. Vernon st. 


Public. 


40 


269 


.... 


Whipple . , . 


Highland ave. . 


Arlington Br. R. R. 


Private. 


30 




318 


tWhite .... 


Elm st. ... 


Cambridge line 


Public. 




'307 


.... 


White St. pi. . . 


White st. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 


.... 


200 


Whitfield road. . 


Packard ave. 


Curtis st. ... 


Private. 


40 




684 


Wigglesworth . . 


Bonair st. . . . 


Pearl st 


Public. 


40 


744 




William .... 


Chandler st. . . 


College ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


381 




William .... 


Broadway . . . 


Medford line . . 


Private. 


50 


.... 


*45 


Williams ct. . . 


Porter st. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


30 




150 


Willoughby . . 


Central st. . . 


Sycamore st. . . 


Public. 


40 


'427 




Willow ave. . . 


Elm st. ... 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


50 


3,534 




Willow pi. . . . 


Cambridge line . 


South st 


Private. 


25 




150 


Wilson ave. . . 


Broadway . . . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


20 


.... 


310 


Wilton .... 


Lowell st. . . . 


Lawrence st. . . 


Public. 


35 


470 


.... 


Winchester . . 


Broadway . . . 


Medford line . . 


Private. 


40 


.... 


65 


Windom . . . 


Elm st. ... 


Summer st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


300 


.... 


Windsor road . . 


Willow ave. . . 


Hancock st. . . 


Public. 


40 


575 


.... 


Winslow ave. . . 


College ave. . . 


Clifton st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,123 


.... 


Winter .... 


College ave. . 


Holland st. . . . 


Public. 


30 


402 


: . . . 


Winter Hill cir. . 


Broadway . . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


25 


.... 


177 


Winthrop ave. 














(Extension.) 


Mystic ave. . . 


Middlesex ave. 


Private. 


40 




583 


Woodbine . . . 


Centre st. . . 


Lowell st. ... 


Private. 


30 




600 


* Woods ave. . . 


North st. . . . 


Alewife brook . . 


Private. 


40 




1,350 


Woodstock . . . 


Victoria st. . . 


Alewife brook . . 


Private, 


40 




415 


♦Woodstock 














(Extension.) 


Victoria st. . . 


Tannery st^Ext'n.") 


Private. 


40 


.... 


920 


Wyatt circle . . 


Wyatt st. . . 


Wyatt st. . . .' 


Private. 


20 ■ 


.... 


315 


Wyatt .... 


Concord ave. 


Lincoln parkway . 


Public. 


40 


496 


.... 


Yorktown . . . 
Yorktown . . . 


Cambridge line . 
| N. E. line ) 
I Malvern ave. J 


\ N. E. line Mai- ) 
* vern ave. J 
Northerly . . . 


Public. 
Private. 


40 
40 


294 


100 



♦Proposed. 



t Sidewalk in Somerville. 



Court .... 


11 Albion st. 


Northeasterly • " 


Private. 


9 




170 


Court .... 


21Albion st. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


10 






100 


Court .... 


292 Broadway . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


15 






96 


Court .... 


612 Broadway . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 






188 


Court .... 


113 Central st. . 


Southeasterly . 


Private. 


20 






150 


Court .... 


227 Columbia st. 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


10 




. . . 


117 


Court « ■ 


36 Craigie st. 


Westerly . . . 


Private. 


25 




. . . 


126 


Court .... 


58 Dane st. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


10 






70 


Court .... 


20 Dimick st. . 


Southwesterly . 


Private. 


39.25 






136 


Court .... 


66 Lowell st. . 


Westerly . . . 


Private. 


25 






101 


Court .... 


78 Lowell st. . 


Westerly . . . 


Private. 


25 






101 


Court .... 


Olive ave. . . 


Porter st. ... 


Private. 


7.5 






156 


Court .... 


10 Stone ave. 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 






113 


Total . . 










394 609 


111,882 



















Public, 74.737 miles ( includes 2.843 miles boulevards ) ; private, 21.190 miles. 
Total length of streets in the city, 95.927 miles. 



REPORT OF THE STREET COMMISSIONER. 



Office of the Street Commissioner, ) 
City Hall, Someryille, January 1, 1910. ) 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: — 

Gentlemen, — I most respectfully submit the thirty-fourth 
annual report, containing a brief summary of the principal work 
performed by the highway department during the year 1909. 

This department has charge of the construction, alteration, 
repair, maintenance, and management of ways, streets, side- 
walks and bridges ; also the setting out and care of shade trees, 
the suppression of brown-tail and gypsy moths, elm-leaf beetles, 
and the supervision of street watering and oiling. 

The department having a liberal appropriation in the High- 
ways Construction Account and not many streets to construct 
under the Betterment Act, his honor, the mayor, and the board 
of aldermen were in favor of constructing the main thorough- 
fares. 

On Highland avenue the Boston Elevated Railway Com- 
pany laid new rails, paving the tracks with the old paving 
blocks, the whole being laid on a concrete base, and grouted 
with Portland cement. Simpson Brothers Corporation laid the 
concrete base and did the excavating for ninety-five cents per 
square yard, and laid paving blocks for brow-stone in grout 
next to the rails for thirty-two and one-half cents per linear 
foot. The department constructed a three-inch Tarvia 
macadam top, or wearing surface, on top of this concrete base. 
This kind of construction is something new in modern road 
building, and will be watched with much interest. The total 
cost was $55, 768.77. Credits by paving stock, $5,937.22, leav- 
ing a net cost of $19,831.55. This street should be coated over 
in the spring with "Tarvia B." 

Medford street, from Washington street to Somerville 
avenue, both sides, and the space between the tracks was paved 
by the department with granite paving blocks grouted with 
pebbles and 'Tarvia X" at a cost of $2.19 per square yard. 
Total cost, $5,570.45. Credits by paving stock, $170.87. Net 
cost, $5,399.58. 

The contract for the paving of Washington street, easterly 
side, from the Charlestown line to opposite Tufts street, was let 
to Fred S. and A. D. Gore Corporation at $2.91 per square yard. 
A four-inch granite paving block was laid on a concrete base 
with a concrete grout. Total cost, $10,883.63. Credits by 
paving stock, $881.00. Net cost, $10,002.63. This will give 



STKEET COMMISSIONER. 357 

a good entrance to our city from Boston, something which has 
been badly needed. 

Broadway, northerly side from New Cross street to Fells- 
way East, was constructed with Tarvia macadam, the top being 
sealed with 'Tarvia B," at ninety-eight cents per square yard, 
the total cost being $2,886.37. 

Beacon street, both sides, from the Cambridge line to 
Buckingham street, was constructed with Tarvia macadam. 
'Tarvia X" was spread on each layer of stone. The cost of 
this paving was ninety-two cents per square yard, the total cost 
being $2,398.72. 

The cost of all the streets constructed includes the re-set- 
ting of edgestones and crossings and re-paving of sidewalks. 

Holland Street Ledge. 

Quarrying has been carried on at this ledge, and a large 
amount of good stone still remains. 

Stone Crusher. 

The crushing plant has worked 254 days during the year, 
but was unable to supply the demand for stone. The Massa- 
chusetts Broken Stone Company had the contract to furnish 
stone to the city, but was unable to meet the demand, and trap 
rock was purchased from other concerns. There were 8,901 
tons crushed, and 5,421 tons purchased during the year. 

Street Cleaning. 

All the streets, both public and private, were cleaned in the 
spring and fall, and the paved streets were swept as often as 
considered necessary. Push cart men are kept in the squares 
to care for same. The expense of teaming is increasing each 
year on account of the scarcity of dumping places, especially in 
the centre of the city. Eighteen thousand eight hundred and 
ten dollars and fifty-two cents was expended for street clean- 
ing. 

If the residents and storekeepers, when having their ash 
barrels and rubbish put out, would use a little more care, and 
see that there is no loose material on top to blow in the streets, 
it would be a great help to the department in giving the city a 
cleaner appearance. 

If every one would do his little part, we could have one 
of the cleanest cities in the Commonwealth. 

Waste barrels have been placed at the schoolhouses, and 
the scholars instructed to use them, thereby giving a neat ap- 
pearance around city property. 

I recommend that a sanitary flushing or pick-up machine 



358 ANNUAL EEPOETS. 

be purchased. This would reduce the expense in this branch of 
the work. 

A patrol system for keeping the streets clear of rubbish 
and waste paper will be established the coming year. A man 
supplied with a cart, broom, pick, and shovel will be assigned 
to each ward. He will be instructed to care for the same, and 
report any defect in the street or sidewalk in his district. 

Bridges. 

The bridges in this city are in good condition. The 
Lowell-street bridges have been started, and are in a fair way 
to be completed in the spring. Edgestones, sidewalks, and 
streets should be constructed to the same. 

The bridge on Somerville avenue over the Fitchburg divi- 
sion of the Boston & Maine Railroad is nearly completed, and 
in all probability will be opened early the coming year. 

The street on both sides of the approaches to this new 
bridge should be paved with granite paving blocks grouted. 

This will give a good entrance to our city from Cambridge 
and Boston. 

Shade Trees. 

Trees purchased by the abutters are set out by the depart- 
ment free of cost. All the dead and dangerous trees should be 
removed and replaced by live ones. Seventy dead and danger- 
ous trees were removed during the year, and 181 trees set out, 
each supported by a pole, and protected by a wire guard. 

Subways. 

Some repairing will be needed on the subways this coming 
year. Men are assigned to care for them, and extra help is 
provided in case of a storm. 

Sprinkling Streets. 

No contract was made with contractors to furnish drivers 
and horses for the watering carts this year, because the depart- 
ment was using oils and tars in all parts of the city, on ail kinds 
of streets, to keep down the dust. Good results were obtained. 
Under the new law the city can use water or a substitute, and 
assess the abutters at the same rate as for street watering. 

Where "Tarvia B" was used as a dust-layer, one applica- 
tion was sufficient for the season. Although it was disagree- 
able while the applications were being made, this was soon over- 
come and passed off, leaving the street smooth and dustless. 
With some of the other kinds of solutions applications were 
necessary each week. 

Many residents, after seeing the results, have petitioned to 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 359 

have their streets treated in the same manner, and I hope the 
coming year the department may cover nearly the entire city. 

The department, with its own employees, operates the 
sprinklers in the squares, few complaints having been received 
from the tenants, whereas in former years, when the sprinkling 
was done by contractors, many complaints were received at my 
office. 

There are forty double and three single water carts, all 
painted and kept in repair by the department. 

This branch of the work is self-supporting, as the abutters 
pay five cents per linear foot for sprinkling. 

Steam Rollers. 

The fifteen-ton roller has worked 242 days, the twelve-ton 
128 days, and the five-ton roller seventy-four days. These 
rollers were repaired in the spring, but as they have been in the 
service of the department a number of years, will have to be re- 
paired again the coming year, and have some new fittings. 

This year the department hired a roller at the rate of ten 
dollars a day. I recommend the purchase of a new fifteen-ton 
roller, as the money which it is necessary for the city to pay to 
contractors for the use of their rollers could as well be used for 
the purchase of a new one for the city. 

Granolithic Sidewalks. 

The department has laid nearly all this kind of side- 
walks at an average cost of $1.60 per square yard, the abutters 
being assessed half the cost. 

As the abutters desire this kind of sidewalk, and are willing 
to pay half the cost, it is only fair for the city to grant their 
wishes. If a concrete mixing machine were purchased, it 
would reduce the cost of this kind of work, and could be used 
for concrete work of all kinds. 

Snow and Ice. 

During the winter of 1909 there were 3,161 loads of snow 
removed, and a large sum of money expended sanding sidewalks 
and slippery streets on the side hills. The sum of $4,474.72 was 
spent in this branch of the work, and as there is no separate ap- 
propriation for the care of ice and snow, the amount availa- 
ble for street repairs, from which this expenditure must be paid, 
is thereby greatly lessened. The teaming is increasing each 
year on account of the scarcity of dumping places, but in some 
portions of the city this difficulty has been overcome by dump- 
ing the snow into the sewers through manholes, which has 
proved a success. This not only removes the snow quickly, 
thereby opening the main streets and squares to travel, but also 
flushes and purifies the sewers. 



360 ANNUAL REPORTS. ' 

It is the duty of this department to remove the snow from 
all sidewalks in front of public buildings and public grounds, and 
to prevent them from becoming slippery. 

Sections 1 and 2 of Ordinance No. 46, approved February 
12, 1904, as quoted below, clearly regulate the removal of snow 
and ice from sidewalks:— 

Section 1. No owner or tenant of land abutting upon a sidewalk 
within the limits of any highway or townway in this city shall suffer to 
remain on such sidewalk for more than six hours between sunrise and 
sunset, on any day, any snow nor any ice, unless such ice is made even 
and covered with sand or other suitable material to prevent slipping. 
Such owner and tenant shall remove all snow and ice from such side- 
walk within the time and in the manner herein specified. 

Section 2. Whoever violates any of the provisions of Section 1 of 
this ordinance shall forfeit to the city the sum of $25 for each offence. 

Boxes rilled with fine sand have been placed within easy 
access of the push cart men who care for the smoothly-paved 
streets, squares, and subways. 

Where there is an edgestone, if the residents, when clear- 
ing their sidewalks of snow, would clean the same to the outer 
edge of t\e edgestone, it would be a great help, and less expen- 
sive to the department to open the gutters, especially in a thaw 
after a snow storm. 

Underground Wires. 

Permits for opening the streets for the purpose of burying 
wires were issued to the Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany in Broadway, northerly side from Winchester street to 
opposite Billingham street; and to The New England Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company on Broadway, southerly side 
from opposite North street to Alewife brook ; and to both com- 
panies on several main streets to connect the underground with 
the overhead wires on intersecting streets. 

Accepted Streets. 

There were seven streets accepted during the year, com- 
prising a total .length of 3,04(3 feet. There were three streets 
constructed with macadam and Tarvia, comprising a total 
length of 2,782 feet, at a total cost of $5,735.93, or an average 
approximate cost of seventy-eight cents per square yard. In 
all streets which have been constructed during the past seven 
years edgestones have been set and gutters paved with granite 
paving blocks before the construction work was begun. There 
were five streets macadamized and re-surfaced, at a cost of 
$3,871.44. 

There are 74.737 miles of public streets and 21.190 miles of 
private Streets, making a total length of 95.927 miles in the city, 



STKEET COMMISSIONED 



361 



Sidewalks Maintenance. 

As there was no appropriation for this kind of work, which 
comprises the re-setting of edgestones, re-laying brick sidewalks 
and attending to police reports, no extensive work was done ex- 
cept where it was charged to the cost of the new sidewalks and 
streets constructed. I hope and trust that the incoming city 
government will make an appropriation sufficiently large to care 
for the old sidewalks that were laid years ago. This would not 
only please the abutters, who have petitioned year after year to 
have them repaired, but would give a better appearance to the 
streets and save the city from accidents. 

Street Railways. 

The Boston Elevated Railway Company received permis- 
sion to connect the Stoneham line on Mystic avenue with the 
tracks on Broadway through Union street, thus opening up a 
line to the beautiful Fells, which has been well patronized by 
people who could not reach this spot except by carriages or au- 
tomobiles. 

Emergency Call. 

The highway department is the originator of the "Emer- 
gency Call" for employees of the department. The emergency 
call is 8-8 on the fire alarm system, and is used in case of an ac- 
cident on the railroad, a burst water-main, collapse of a bridge, 
big fire, or any other accident in the same line that would be 
likely to cause injury to life or limb, or be a menace to the 
safety of public travel, where teams and men could be used to 
good advantage. The emergency wagon is equipped with 
ropes, lanterns, and all kinds of tools, a quick hitch harness, and 
is always ready in case of an accident. 

Tarvia. 

On all the streets constructed and re-surfaced "Tarvia X" 
was used. Tarviated streets have proved very satisfactory to 
the abutters, and many requests have been received for addi- 
tional work along this line. Somerville is one of the first cities 
to use this material as a binder. 

Suppression of the Gypsy and Brown-Tail Moths. 

The department cared for all the street trees and trees in 
yards where citizens had not cared for them. Although the 
work was started late the entire city was covered, and very few 
complaints were received at my office in the spring in regard to 
the men overlooking any nests. The moths are under control 
in our city, there being very few on the city trees, and after a 



363 ANNUAL EEPOETS. 

careful inspection I find most of them confined to the yards in 
the western part. The law gives the city the right to go on any 
property to care for the moths and to make the assessment on 
the tax 'bill. 

There were sixty-four bushels found in the yards, and 
twenty-one bushels on the street trees. All were taken to the 
city yard and burned in a furnace. 

Elm- Leaf Beetle. 

This pest gave the department considerable work, and as 
the equipment was small it was impossible to meet the demands. 
I recommend that a power spraying machine be purchased the 
coming year, which will enable the department to cover the en- 
tire city before the beetle destroys all our beautiful elm trees. 
This machine, if purchased, could be used against the ravages of 
the other moths. 

The Leopard Moth. 

This moth is destroying many of the trees, and, unlike the 
other moths, which feed on the foliage, bores into the branches 
and feeds upon the living wood, thus making it hard to find 
them. The larvae usually begin operations in twigs and small 
branches, and with their larger growth bore and tunnel into the 
larger branches and trunks. This work has the effect of gird- 
ling, the injured portion being blown down by heavy wind and 
snow storms, while in the case of severe attack the growth of 
the tree is checked, frequently causing its death. The fallen 
branches and twigs are gathered and taken to the dumps and 
burned. 

There should be an appropriation for the extermination of 
this pest. The trees could then be examined and the larvae de- 
stroyed before it is too late. 

illscellaneous. 

Specifications were sent out to all the local and wholesale 
concerns and bids asked for the furnishing of edgestones, brick, 
sand, gravel, cement, paving stock, etc. The bids were opened 
publicly in the office of the mayor, and the contracts were 
awarded to the lowest bidder, preference being given to Somer- 
ville citizens or taxpayers. 

The department maintains its own painter, carpenter, 
blacksmith, horseshoer, and harness repairer, all employed at 
the city stables. 

If the names of certain streets in different parts of the city 
were changed it would be a great convenience to the public. A 
committee was appointed from the board of aldermen to inter- 
view the property owners on private streets bearing the same 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 363 

name as public streets, and to request them to change the names 
of such streets, as the city has no jurisdiction over the naming 
of private ways. 

This department has been called upon to furnish steam 
rollers, teams, crushed stone, sand, gravel, and ashes to the 
other departments, being reimbursed for the same. 

There were 219 permits issued to the Cambridge Gas Light 
Company and 117 issued to the Charlestown Gas and Electric 
Company for opening of streets for gas connections and re- 
pairs. There were issued to contractors and corporations, for 
building purposes, 213 permits to occupy and 154 permits to 
open streets, and fifty-eight to cross the sidewalks. There were 
six permits issued to erect canopies, eight to feed horses, and 
two to run steam rollers through the streets ; 185 permits were 
given to licensed drain layers to open streets for sewer connec- 
tions. 

There were 318 defects in the streets and sidewalks re- 
ported by the chief of police, which were promptly repaired, 
thereby saving the city the possibility of law suits. 

There were thirty-seven signs and guide posts painted and 
sixteen re-painted and erected by the department during the 
year. 

There were 4,731.4 square yards of block stone gutters laid, 
at a cost of $10,174.25, an average cost of $2.15 per square yard, 
2,370 square yards of sand and gravel used, 12,305 loads of dirt 
removed or handled, 10,832 loads of scrapings removed from 
the streets, 934 loads of old macadam used in the repair and 
construction of streets, 5,707 loads of ashes used in the repair 
and construction work of sidewalks and streets, 6,980.6 square 
yards of granolithic and brick sidewalks laid at an average cost 
of $1.60 per square yard for granolithic and $1.14 per square 
yard for brick, 14,194.2 feet, or nearly 2.69 miles, of edgestones 
set, at a cost of $13,994.88, or an average cost of $1.01 per linear 
foot, 5,015.5 feet of edgestones, or nearly .95 miles, reset, and 
1,436.3 square yards of brick sidewalks relaid at a cost of 
$3,871.44. This amount includes patching sidewalks and attend- 
ing to police reports of defects. 

I have attended nineteen meetings of the committee on 
highways for consultation regarding work and petitions. 

Recommendations. 

As we now have a good thoroughfare through the centre 
of our city it would be a good idea for the city to construct 
Broadway and Beacon street, which have already been started 
Ihis would give a through thoroughfare on the north and one 
on the south. 

As recommended in my last year's report, a drain and catch 



3 6 ± ANNUAL REPORTS. 

basins have been laid and constructed on Middlesex avenue. 
As it is the intention of the Boston & Maine Railroad to erect 
large repair shops on land adjoining this street, the city gov- 
ernment should construct this thoroughfare and also the part 
of Mystic avenue not taken bv the Massachusetts Highway 
Commission. These two thoroughfares are used by the cities 
and towns lying north of our city and are at the present time in 
an unsatisfactory condition. 

Edgestones should be set and gutters paved on both sides 
of College avenue from Powder-house square to the Medford 
line, and the street macadamized and Tarviated from the Med- 
ford line to Davis square. This would give the city a good 
street from Medford and a better appearance to the approaches 
to Tufts College. 

There are several brick and granolithic sidewalks that 
should be extended or the intervening spaces completed so as to 
make one continuous walk between intersecting streets, as the 
spaces are a source of great inconvenience to pedestrians, es- 
pecially in the spring and fall. 

The granite paving on Somerville avenue should be ex- 
tended to Oak square. 

Elm, Newton, and Springfield streets are all very narrow 
between the car tracks and the edgestones, thus making it al- 
most impossible to keep them in good repair with macadam. 
They should be paved with some kind of permanent paving. 

The brick paving already laid in Davis square should be 
extended on Holland street. Medford street from Highland 
avenue to Gilman square, and Summer street from Central 
street to Cutter square should be re-surfaced and Tarviated. 

I also wish to recommend that a fence be built around the 
yard at the stable and that a combination shop for repairing and 
painting be established. 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 365 

Highways flaintenance Account. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 $5,613 98 

Receipts and credits: — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, street 

railway tax $45,778 32 

Boston Elevated Railway tax . . . 9,236 99 

Health Department, collection of ashes, 

1908 191 90 

F. R. Mathison, loam . . . . 142 50 

Private work, the bills for which re- 
mained unpaid December 31, 1907, and 

1908 61 45 

Value of materials on hand January 1, 1909, 1,111 00 
Value of tools and property on hand Janu- 
ary 1, 1909 28,449 17 

$84,971 33 



$90,585 31 



Less amount transferred to Sidewalks Maintenance ac- 
count 1,082 19 



$89,503 12 
Profit and loss on tools, property, and materials . . 3,157 98 



Total credit $92,661 10 

DEBIT. 

Expenditures: — 

For repairs of sundry streets as per table B, at end of 
this report 

General repairs of streets 

Repairs and maintenance of gravel sidewalks 

Repairs of street crossings . . . . 

Repairs of gutters 

Repairs of driveways 

Repairs of stone paving . . . . . 

Removing snow and ice and care of slippery sidewalks, 

Cleaning streets 

Care of subways 

Removing trees 

Setting trees 

Trimming trees 

Street opening at Acadia park, off Somerville avenue . 

Street opening at Walker street, northeasterly side of 
Broadway 

Street opening, Broadway, at Corinthian road 

Street opening, Buena Vista road, off Holland street, 

Street opening at court, off Moreland street, westerly 
side 

Placing circles at intersection of Fenwick street and 
Broadway 

Building fence between Holland-street ledge and Simp- 
son estate 

Waltham gravel land, taxes of 1909 .... 

Blacksmithing 

Amount carried forward $42,842 22 



$4,456 79 


9,206 


57 


2,792 80 


154 


32 


181 


77 


97 27 


220 


05 


4,474 


72 


18,810 


52 


156 27 


646 


15 


380 90 


316 


11 


168 


03 


125 75 


66 


04 


32 


81 


9 


65 


11 


21 


162 94 


106 80 


264 75 



366 



AtftfTJAL itEfOJtTg. 



Amount brought forward . 
Carpentering . . . . 

Painting 

Street signs 

Albert M. Burbank, timekeeper 

Street Commissioner's salary . 

Street Commissioner's team 

Street Commissioner's telephone 

Repairs of tools .... 

Health Department (bill unpaid December 31, 1909) 

Lowell-street Bridges (bill unpaid December 31, 1909) 

Books, printing, stationery, and postage 

Sundry expenses 

Private work, the bills for which remained unpaid De 
cember 31, 1909 . 

Value of materials on hand this day .... 

Value of tools and personal property on hand this day: — 
Horses . . . . . . . $7,730 00 

Carts and implements used with horses . 8,071 50 

Harnesses and horse clothing . . . 1,426 37 

Harness supplies 74 91 

Horse medicine 15 04 

Horseshoes 69 25 

Stable utensils and property . . . 630 03 

Tools . . . . . . . 2,582 30 

Steam road rollers 6,000 00 

Stone fittings and crusher . . . 1,847 50 

Street signs 112 00 



Total debit 
Balance unexpended 



$42,842 22 
300 78 
320 69 
315 65 
129 50 

2,000 00 
288 33 
14 61 
120 37 
335 55 
124 90 
115 47 

1,279 70 

142 85 
3,429 99 



$28,558 90 
$80,319 51 
$12,341 59 



High wave Construction Account. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1908 $2,099 80 

Appropriation 80,000 00 

Transfer from Shade Trees account of 1908, 33 38 

Advertising and recording deeds in 1907 
and 1908, charged in construction of 
streets in 1909 $43 65 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings 

account (paving blocks) . . . 6,955 09 



Total credit 



DEBIT. 



Expenditures : — 

Construction of streets, as appears by 

table A, at end of this report 
Less assessments 



$85,602 93 
3,363 01 



$82,133 18 



6,998 74 
$89,131 92 



$82,239 92 



Amount carried forward 



$82,239 92 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 



36? 



Amount brought forward 

Partial abatement of assessment, constructing Cleveland 

street, assessed in 1908 

Partial abatement of assessment, constructing Vine street 

in 1908 . 

Taxes assessed by city in 1905 and 1906, Weston avenue 

(Clarendon-hill ledge lot) 

Taking of land from estate of Abbie E. Taylor for con 

struction of Cleveland street .... 

Taking of land from estate of Charles L. Upham for con 

struction of Heath street in 1908 .... 
Abatement of Highway Betterment Assessments to 

sundry persons 

Advertising and recording releases and plans for streets 

not constructed 



Total debit 



Balance unexpended 



$82,239 92 

39 90 

„ 66 50 

97 25 

500 00 

75 00 

67 79 

94 05 

$83,180 41 

$5,951 51 



Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation . . . . _ . . $8,000 00 
Transfer from Sewers Construction ac- 
count 7,670 95 



Value of material on hand January 1, 1909 . 
Net gain on materials 



$54 40 
107 98 



Total credit 



Expenditures: — 

For paving thirteen 



DEBIT. 



gutters, as per 



table D 


$10,174 25 


Street crossings, as per table H 


1,038 07 


Value of materials on hand December 31 . 


4,621 01 






Highways, Watering Streets. 


CREDIT. 




Receipts: — 




Assessments and contributions from 




abutters 


$30,707 25 


Insurance on water carts (collected 




from contractors) ..... 


70 00 


Gulf Refining Co., empty barrels . 


59 47 


Barrett Manufacturing Co., empty 




barrels 


29 00 


Value of w r ater carts on hand January 1, 




1909 


11,750 00 


Total credit 





$15,670 95 

162 38 
$15,833 33 



$15,833 33 



$42,615 72 



36S 



AXXUAL EEPOETS. 



DEBIT. 

Expenditures: — 

Teaming (street watering) 
Use of city teams 
Building platform 
Tarvia 

Asfaltoil emulsion 
Dust preventive . 
Asphaltum . 
Lard . 

Repairs of water carts 
Painting water carts . 
Insurance on water carts 
Water posts 
Repairing water posts 
Rubber boots 
Clerical work (making assessment list) 
Books, printing, and postage 
Margaret E. Lawler, excess paid for 
watering on Columbus avenue 



Value of water carts on hand this day 
Profit and loss on water carts 



$20,799 95 


2,345 00 


69 


38 


3,669 


53 


263 20 


1,270 


50 


518 


45 


1 


76 


338 


94 


1,013 


55 


90 


00 


108 25 


184 37 


21 


00 


125 


34 


2'9 62 


5 92 


$30,854 


10 


11,550 00 


200 


00 



Total debit 
Balance unexpended 



$42,604 76 
$10 96 



Lowell Street Bridges. 



CREDIT 



Appropriation 

Advertising 

Labor 

Use of city teams 

Teaming, filling 

Filling 

Raising houses 

Carpentering 

Mason work 

Plumbing 

Lumber 

Furnace and stove work 

Changing grade of manholes 

Bricks 

Edgestones and circles 

Cement 

Crushed stone . 

Paving blocks . 

Pipe and strainer 

Photographs 

Engineering work and inspection 

Total debit 

Balance unexpended 



DEBIT 



$13 00 


2,516 


13 


286 30 


434 


70 


358 


00 


460 


00 


445 


97 


2,223 


00 


367 


62 


529 


37 


141 


36 


394 28 


10 


80 


35 


69 


12 


89 


49 77 


9 


50 


2 99 


16 50 


125 00 


. 


• 



$40,000 00 



$8,432 87 
$31,567 13 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 369 

Sidewalks Construction Account. 

CREDIT. I ' 

Balance from 1908 $309 13 

Appropriation 12,000 00 

Balance of uncollected bill of 1908 . . 13 10 

Total credit $12,322 23 

DEBIT. , 

Expenditures: — 

For thirty-four sidewalks con- 
structed as per table C . $24,166 39 
Less assessments . . . 12,083 18 

$12,083 21 



Abatement of assessment, estate of 
Mary A. Kenney, for construction of 
sidewalk, Loring street, in 1908 . . 25 62 

Abatement of assessment in front of es- 
tate of James J. and Catharine A. Mc- 
Farlane, for construction of sidewalk, 
Moreland street, in 1908^ ... 15 28 

Abatement of assessment in front of es- 
tate of Ellen F. Collins, for construc- 
tion of sidewalk, Vine street, 1908 . 51 59 

West End Street Railway Co., taking of 
land and damage to estate, Vine street, 
in constructing sidewalk, Vine street, 
1908 35 08 

William St. G. Little, taking of land and 
damage to estate, Cleveland street, in 
constructing sidewalk, 1908 . 

Books 

Total debit 

Balance unexpended 



Sidewalks Maintenance Account. 

CREDIT. ! 

Transfer from Highways Maintenance ac- 
count $1,082 19 

Receipts and credits: — 

From Julius A. Durell, balance of bill 
of 1908 1 50 



31 76 
13 00 




. 


$12,255 54 
^6Q 69 



Total credit $1,083 69 

DEBIT. I 

Expenditures: — ! ; 

Labor, repairing sidewalks . . . $758 45 

Use of city teams, repairing sidewalks . 163 10 

Repairing concrete sidewalk ... 4 00 

Bricks used in repairing sidewalks . . 142 75 



Amount carried forward .... $1,068 30 



370 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward .... $1,068 30 

Crushed stone used in repairing side- 
walks . ... . . . 4 34 

Sand used in repairing sidewalks . . 4 80 

i $1,077 44 

Value of materials on hand December 31, 

1909 6 25 

Suppression of Gypsy and Brown-Tail Hoths. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation 

Receipts: — 

From sundry persons, removal of moths 

from trees $1,G49 41 

'New England Oil Co. (oil barrel re- 
turned) 1 50 

Total credit 

DEBIT. 

Expenditures: — 

For labor ... . . _ . . . $2,860 58 

Use of city teams and teaming . . 123 20 

Walsh Brothers, spraying trees . 8 50 

Tools ...".... 63 75 

Supplies 29 14 

Books, circulars, stationery, and 

postage 136 25 

Clerical work ...... 53 34 

Total debit 

Balance unexpended 

Suppression of Elm-Leaf Beetle. 

CREDIT. ! 

Appropriation 

DEBIT. 

Expenditures: — 

For labor $670 50 

Use of city teams 58 80 

Walsh Brothers, spraying trees . 3 00 

Arsenate of lead 114 50 

Total debit 

Balance unexpended 



$1,083 69 



$3,800 00 



1,650 91 



$5,450 91 



$3,274 76 
$2,176 15 



$1,000 00 



$846 80 



$153 20 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 



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ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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376 



ANNUAL KEPOKTS. 



TABLE E. 
Driveways Constructed at Expense of Abutters. 



For 



American Tube Works . 

Builders' Iron and Steel Co. 

William Crossman . 

Derby Desk Company 

E. Charles Drouet . 

E. Charles Drouet . 

R. A. Fash . 

Frederick A. P. Fiske 

Harry Gavel . 

Dr. Arthur A. Gibson 

Joseph Gridley 

J. Ernest Gustin 

Ella G. Haig . 

Hattie E. Marsh . . 

Harvey D. McGray 

J. Frank Mixer 

Leander A. Penney 

Walter H. Snow . 

West Somerville Public Library 



Location. 



. Somerville avenue 
1 Somerville avenue 

8 Ashland street 
. Central street 

Pleasant avenue 

. 56 Bow street 

. 14 Wheeler street 

44 Cherry street 

55 Vernon street 

. 22 Bow street 

179 Highland avenue 

3 Virginia street 

9 Carlton street 
. 35 Day street 

. 95 College avenue 

. 119 Central street 

192 Pearl street 

46 Derby street 

College avenue 



TABLE F. 
Driveway Discontinued at Expense of Abutter. 



For 


Location. 




31 Wheatland street 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 



377 





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378 ANNUAL KEPOKTS. 

TABLE H. 

Street Crossings Laid. 

GRANITE FLAGGING. 

Acadia park, across same, at northerly side of Somerville avenue. 

Broadway, across same, between School street and Dartmouth street. 

Broadway, across same, between Thurston street and Sycamore street. 

Glen street, across same, at southerly side of Pearl street. 

Holland street, southerly side, at Buena Vista road. 

Mystic avenue, across same, from easterly side of Austin street. 

PAVING BRICKS. 

Benedict avenue, southwesterly side, across Benedict street. 
Summer street, across same, from easterly side of Cedar street. 

PAVING BLOCKS. 

Medford street, across same, at westerly side of Walnut street. 

Length of Accepted Streets in Each Ward. 

Miles. 

Ward 1 9.494 

"2 8.533 

"3 7.479 

"4 9.390 

"5 11.373 

"6 12.447 

"7 16.021 



Total length of ace ^pted streets in the city . . . 74.737 

Respectfully submitted, 

Asa B. Pkichakd, 

Street Commissioner. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



Office of Commissioner of Public Buildings, ) 
City Hall, Somerville, January 1, 1910. ) 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 

the City of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor, as commissioner of public 
buildings, to submit the following as the report of the depart- 
ment of public buildings and the department of inspection of 
buildings for the year 1909. In submitting this report I desire 
to express my appreciation of the valuable counsel and advice 
received from his honor, the mayor, and from the members of 
the honorable, the board of aldermen. 

Somerville Beach. 

In the report of this department for the year 1908 a detailed 
description was given of the Somerville bathing beach and bath- 
ing houses. The patronage had so increased that in response 
to the request of the commissioner provision was made for ad- 
ditional facilities. An addition was made to the building which 
doubled in size the original plant and provided much better ac- 
commodations for those of our citizens who availed themselves 
of the privileges of the beach. This institution is still increas- 
ing in popularity, and it will undoubtedly be necessary soon to 
further increase the accommodations. In addition to the above 
mentioned improvements a shelter was constructed on the shore 
of the river for those who desired to watch the bathing. A 
diving raft was also provided and located in the river, which was 
very much enjoyed by the patrons. 

The commissioner would respectfully assure the citizens of 
Somerville that every attention will be given them if they desire 
to patronize the Somerville beach, and hopes that the season of 
1910 will show a largely-increased patronage. 

Contagious Hospital. 

It became necessary to provide better living accommoda- 
tions for the nurses of this hospital, and on October 2, 1909, an 
order was passed by the board of aldermen authorizing the con- 
struction of the addition to the present building and appropriat- 
ing $7,000 for the same. Plans were drawn and specifications 
prepared by this department and the estimates opened by his 
honor, the mayor, on September 29, 1909, which were as fol- 
lows '.r-r 



180 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 







$6,700 00 






6,125 00 






5,990 00 






5,800 00 






5,745 00 






5,490 00 






4,749 00 



J. M. Andrews & Son 
W. Fillmore & Co. • . 
J. E. Locatelli & Co. . 
J. P. Foley . 
E. N. Hutchinson 
Arthur W. Berry . 
J. E. L. McLean . 

The lowest bidder. J. E. L. McLean, was awarded the con- 
tract. This contract did not include the heating, plumbing, or 
furnishing. The work was started promptly, and the addition 
is now completed and occupied. 

This addition with the other interior changes will provide 
for the needs of this institution for years to come and make the 
work there much easier to perform than formerly, and will pro- 
vide more comfortable living accommodations for both pa- 
tients and attendants. 



Care of School Buildings. 

In order that the buildings in which the school children are 
required to spend so much of their time during the years of their 
educational life may be kept in a clean and hygienic condition, 
it is necessary at all times for somebody to exercise the most 
careful vigilance. The responsibility of this work is placed upon 
the commissioner of public buildings. The commissioner as 
well as the superintendent of schools must have the confidence 
of the people who are sending their children to be cared for day 
after day. The moral and physical elements of the child's na- 
ture are just as important as the intellectual and must be looked 
after just as carefully. It has been the aim of the present com- 
missioner to remedy unsatisfactory conditions and establish im- 
proved appliances for so doing whenever the necessity existed. 

Attention was called by the commissioner in his report of 
1908 particularly to the dust evil. The matter has been watched 
very carefully and experiments made in the endeavor to remedy 
the difficulty. The use of dust preventives is being continued, 
and the evil is largely eliminated. Continued efforts will be 
made until a perfect condition exists. 

The danger from the unsanitary drinking cup has been 
given careful attention, and as a solution of the problem forty 
sanitary drinking fountains were installed in the various school 
buildings. These fountains were installed in the regular sinks 
of the buildings, and although not satisfactory in every particu- 
lar the commissioner feels that the experiment will result 
eventually in solving this important matter. 

The question of cleanliness of school buildings has been 
given careful attention, and in most instances our buildings are 
in a clean and hygienic condition. The general supervision of 
this work has been delegated to John H. Kelley, who is also the 
head janitor of the high school buildings, and his careful and 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



381 



oversight 



has resulted in much better conditions 



systematic 

than before existed. 

The school buildings placed in accordance with the charter 
under the department of public buildings are as follows : — 

Buildings. Valuation. 

Baxter school $32,955 64 

Bell school 45,400 00 

Bennett school 50,448 32 

Bingham school 68,885 04 

Brown school 59,690 16 

Burns school 34,760 00 

Carr school 53,800 00 

Cummings school 11,921 00 

Davis school 22,720 00 

Durell school 19,720 00 

Edgerly school 44,230 00 

Forster school 85,290 00 

Glines school 80,540 00 

Hanscom school 69,530 00 

Latin High school 79,365 00 

English High school.. 137,900 00 

Highland school 60,560 00 

Hodgkins school 71,700 00 

Knapp school 50,540 00 

Lincoln school 18,220 00 

Morse school 48,199 00 

Perry school 37,080 00 

Pope school 80,160 00 

Prescott school 66,260 00 

Proctor school 42,820 16 

Lowe school 51,826 16 

In addition to the above, the following public buildings are 
under the control of this department : — 

Public library 42,000 00 1884 Highland avenue 

Police building 57,000 00 1874 Bow street 

City hall 47,432 32 1851 Highland avenue 

Citv hall annex 20,655 02 1898 Highland avenue 

Contagious hospital... . 22,793 76 1906 Broadway 

Citv home 37,901 73 1871 Broadway 

Citv stables 84,000 00 1894 Broadway 

Health shed 1,189 79 1905 Broadway 

Water dept. stable.... 32,000 00 1889 Cedar street 

Central fire station.... 37,200 00 1893 Medford street 

Engine 2 building 33,600 00 1894 Broadway 

Plose 2 10,800 00 1871 Marshall street 

Ladder 1 56,143 18 1904 Union square 

Ladder 2 15,300 00 1894 Highland avenue 

LTose 5 16,900 00 1888 Somerville avenue 

Hose 6 18,200 00 1898 Holland street 

Engine 4 15,900 00 1874 Highland avenue 

Incinerating plant 3,000 00 1907 Cedar street 

Bathhouse 3,368 21 1908 Mystic river 

Total $1,989,054 49 



Year Built. 


Location. 


1901 


Bolton street 


1874 


Vinal avenue 


1902 


Maple street 


1886 


Lowell street 


1901 


Willow avenue 


1886 


Cherry street 


1893 


Atherton street 


1884 


School street 


1884 


Tufts street 


1894 


Beacon street 


1871 


Cross street 


1866 


Svcamore street 


1891 


Jaques street 


1897 


Webster street 


1871 


Highland avenue 


1895 


Highland avenue 


1880 


Highland avenue 


1896 


Holland street 


1889 


Concord - square 


1885 


Broadway 


1869 


Summer street 


1899 


Washington street 


1891 


Washington street 


1867 


Pearl street 


1905 


Hudson street 


1903 


Morrison avenue 



O^V 



AXXrAL REPORTS. 



Heating and Ventilating. 

The new heating- and ventilating system installed at the 
Highland school is described in detail elsewhere in this report. 
This work leaves the Morse, Cummings, and Davis schools the 
only ones in which furnaces are in nse for heating and venti- 
lating. I would recommend that during the coming year a 
steam heating and ventilating system be installed in the Morse 
school building - . 

Several boilers were repaired as to their tubing and an en- 
tirely new boiler installed in the Prescott school building. The 
system of radiation in the air room at the Glines school was 
changed in order to provide for the school's needs. Other 
minor changes were made in the various school buildings which 
were found necessary. The following table will describe the 
system in use in the various buildings and the existing condition 
of each : — 



School. No. 


of Rooms. 




System. 


Working Condition. 


Baxter 


6 


gravity- 


-automatic control 


good 


Bell 


12 


fan — 


automatic control 


good 


Bingham 


16 


gravity- 


—hand control 


good 


Bennett 


12 


gravity- 


-hand control 


good 


Brown 


6 


gravity- 


—hand control 


good 


Burns 


8 


gravity- 


-hand control 


good 


Carr 


16 


gravity- 


—hand control 


good 


Cummings 


4 


furnace 




not satisfactory 


Davis 


4 


furnace 




not satisfactory 


Durell 


4 


gravity- 


-hand control 


good 


Edgerly 


12 


gravity- 


-hand control 


good 


Forster 


12 


gravity- 


-hand control 


good 


Forster Anne 


:x 6 


gravity- 


-hand control 


good 


Glines 


14 


gravity- 


-hand control 


good 


Hanscom 


6 


fan — 


hand control 


good 


High 


47 


fan— | 


part hand control 
part automatic cor 


Ltrol good 


Highland 


12 


gravity- 


-hand control 


good 


Hodgkins 


12 


gravity- 


-hand control 


good 


Knapp 


12 


gravity- 


-automatic control 


good 


Lincoln 


4 


gravity- 


-hand control 


good 


Morse 


12 


furnace- 


-hand control 


not satisfactory 


Perry 


8 


gravity- 


-hand control 


good 


Pope 


12 


gravity- 


-hand control 


good 


Prescott 


12 


fan — 


automatic control 


good 


Proctor 


8 


gravity- 


-hand control 


good 


Lowe 


8 


gravity- 


-hand control 


good 



Sanitaries, Cummings and Davis Schools. 

In compliance with my request of last year an order was 
passed by the board of aldermen on June 25, 1909, authorizing 
the installation of new sanitary systems in the above-mentioned 
school buildings and appropriating the sum of $3,000 for the 
same. These svstems were installed during the summer vaca- 
tion. The plans and specifications were made by this depart- 
ment and the estimates opened by the mayor on June 24, 1909, 
which were as follows : — 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



383 



$830 00 


$825 00 


810 00 


804 00 


750 00 


740 00 


730 00 


735 00 


723 00 


734 00 


694 00 


697 00 


680 00 


680 00 


717 00 


667 00 



Davis School. Cummings School. 

H. E. Campbell 
W. J. Henderson 
C. B. Cahalan . 
F. O. Johnson . 
Armstrong Brothers 
J. J. Fisher 
E. S. Stack & Co. . 
J. H. Adcock . 

The contracts were awarded to the lowest bidders, in each 
case, viz., to E. S. Stack & Co. for the work at the Davis school, 
and to J. H. Adcock for the work at the Cummings school. 
Work was begun at once and completed for the opening of 
school in September. These changes were much needed and 
improve greatlv the sanitary conditions in these buildings. 

Toilets. 

With the exception of the new sanitary systems installed 
in the Davis and Cummings schools and described in detail else- 
where in this report, the changes in the toilets were of a minor 
nature. The toilets are inspected each week by Duncan C. 
Greene, the inspector of plumbing, and his conscientious work 
in this direction has produced results which are well worth the 
effort and expense. 

The following table will describe the systems in use and the 
existing conditions of each : — 

General 
Working 
Condition. 



School. System. 

Baxter Hydraulic closet system. 

Bell 

Bennett 

Bingham 

Brown 

Burns 

Carr 

Cummings " " " 

Davis " " " 

Durell " Latrine " 

Edgerly " closet 

Forster " " " 

Forster Annex " " " 

Glines " " " 

Hanscom " " " 

Latin High " " " 

English High " " " 

Highland " " " 

Hodgkins " " " 

Knapp " (i " 

Lincoln " " " 

Morse " " « 

Perry " " " 

Pope " " « 

Prescott " " " 

Proctor " " " 

Lowe " " « 



Ventilation. 
Local vented. Good. 



Inadequate 
u 

Good 



384 ANNUAL EEP0HT3. 

Installation of Heating and Ventilating System in the Highland 

School. 

The furnace system of heating and ventilating which had 
been in constant use for a great many years in this school build- 
ing was so absolutely unfit for further use that it became neces- 
sary to install an entirety new system. The one decided on as 
the best adapted to the needs of the building was the gravity 
system. Plans were made by the commissioner of public build- 
ings. The construction of the building was of such a nature 
that the ventilating flues of the old, with some alterations, could 
be used for similar purposes in the new system. In order to ar- 
range for boilers and fresh-air chambers it was necessary to re- 
arrange the basement of the building. This work consisted of 
mason, carpenter, plumbing and steel work. Estimates were 
received and publicly opened by Mayor John M. Woods on July 
8, 1909, for this heating and ventilating work, as follows : — 



A. B. Franklin . 
Pierce & Cox 
McLean & Cousins 
Whitten & Jackson 
Duncan & Co. 
Huey Brothers . 
Hurley & Co. 

The lowest bidders, Messrs. Hurley & Co., were awarded 
the contract by his honor, the mayor. The contract called for 
the installation of a steam heating system in accordance with the 
plans and specifications made by the commissioner of public 
buildings. The specifications included everything except the 
metal work, which was omitted on account of the uncertainty of 
the amount to be required. Work on the installation of this 
plant was begun at once by the successful bidders and was com- 
pleted in time for the opening of the school year in September. 

Inspection of Buildings. 

There have been issued during the year 1909, 373 permits 
for new buildings and alterations. This number is 115 more 
than in 1908. The total estimated cost of the new buildings and 
alterations was $1,443,729. while the cost in 1908 was $954,145, 
showing an increase of $489,584. 

During the year there have been made 1,276 regular inspec- 
tions of private buildings in the course of construction. 



If Sectional 


If Tubular 


Boilers 


Boilers 


Were Used. 


Were Used 


$5,135 00 


$3,957 00 


4,942 00 


3,953 00 


4,884 00 


3,939 00 


4,777 00 


4,071 00 


4,773 00 


3,679 00 


4,627 00 


3,867 00 


4,245 00 


3,300 00 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



385 



The following table will show the number of permits in 
each ward and the use for which they were intended : — 









WARDS. 










Buildings- 
















Total. 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




Dwellings .... 


9 


20 


18 


19 


31 


44 


125 


266 




1 


1 


1 


3 


4 


3 


7 


20 







2 


3 


1 


1 








7 


Manufactories . . . 





1 








1 


1 


1 


4 


Brick buildings . . . 





2 


1 





1 


1 


8 


13 


Miscellaneous . . . 


12 


9 


7 


11 


9 


7 


8 


63 


Total 


22 


35 


30 


34 


47 


56 


149 


373 



The number of plumbing permits issued during the year was 
Permits for plumbing in new buildings . 
Permits for plumbing in old buildings 
Number of buildings in which soil pipes were tested 
Number of master plumbers' licenses, 49 at $.50 . 
Number of journeyman plumbers' licenses, 26 at $.50 
Number of new master plumbers' licenses, 1 at $2.00 
Number of new journeyman plumbers' licenses, 3 at $.50 



421 

205 

215 

349 

$24.50 

13.00 

2.00 

1.50 



Total $41.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter T. Littlefield, 
Commissioner of Public Buildings. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF ELECTRIC LINES 

AND LIGHTS. 



Office of Commissionek of Electkic Lines and Lights, ) 

January 1, 1910. ) 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen, — I most respectfully submit my first annual re- 
port as commissioner of electric line and lights for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1909. 

The work of the electrical department consists of the fol- 
lowing : — 

Inspection of electrical wiring in buildings. 

Construction, maintenance, and operation of the fire and 
police alarm systems. 

Supervision and inspection of poles and wires on the 
streets, underground conduits and wires, and street lighting. 

Inspection of Wiring in Buildings. 

The inspection of electrical wiring in buildings has been 
given careful attention. As work is being done in a number of 
cases by incompetent persons, a rigid supervision of all work 
installed is necessary in order to insure the smallest possible 
chance of fire and danger to persons who are users of electric 
current. 

The general class of work as a whole shows a marked im- 
provement over previous years, being brought about by the 
united efforts of the various insurance, electrical and other in- 
terests which have approved of the National Board of Fire 
Underwriters' rules governing the installation of electric wiring 
and apparatus, as published in the "National Electric Code/' 

The enforcement of these rules and requirements by the 
various electrical departments, and co-operation given the in- 
spection departments by reliable electrical contractors, has re- 
sulted in' a more durable and safe class of construction, and 
property owners should see that proper notifications of any new 
work or changes of the old be given the electrical inspection 
department in order that unsafe installations which are not up 
to the standard requirements may be made so, thereby avoiding 
the possibility of electrical fires or more serious consequences. 



# # 


749 


. , 


670 




165 


# e 


216 


• • 1 


186 




104 




104 




1,155 



COMMISSIONER OF ELECTRIC LINES AND LIGHTS. 387 

Number of notifications of new work received 
Number of inspections of new work 
Number of re-inspections of new work 
Number of inspections of old work 
Number of defective installations of old work 
Number of defective installations remedied 
Number of re-inspections of old work . 
Total number of inspections .... 

Number of permits issued to The Edison Electric ^Illu- 
minating Company for installing meters, lamps, etc. . 431 

Number of incandescent lamps added 4,947 

Number of arc lamps added 5 

Number of motors added .54 

Horse power of motors 151 

Construction, Etc., of the Fire and Police Alarm Systems. 

FIRE ALARM SYSTEM. 

This system has given good service during the past year, 
215 alarms having been transmitted correctly. 

There are 117 signal boxes which are inspected on an aver- 
age of once a month, reducing to a minimum the possibility of 
a box not giving an alarm when pulled. 

All wires and equipment are under a constant inspection to 
insure a perfect system, and the absence of any serious trouble 
during the severe storm of December 25 and 26 shows the result 
of such supervision, there being but two breaks in the lines, 
which were repaired in a short time. 

The fire alarm equipment consists of the following: 117 
signal boxes, one eight-circuit automatic repeater, eight tower 
strikers, thirty-one gongs, nine indicators, forty-six tappers, 
one automatic steam whistle, twelve private telephones con- 
necting the various fire stations, 494 cells storage battery, and 
about 150 miles of overhead wire and 21,046 feet of under- 
ground cable. 

There have been two new signal boxes added during the 
year : — 

Box 124, corner Mt. Vernon and Pearl streets. 
Box 453, Powder House boulevard, corner Packard ave- 
nue. 

Two more new signal boxes have been ordered and will be 
placed as follows : — 

Box 241, corner Calvin and Dimick streets. 

Box 411, corner Mossland and Elm streets. 

Duplicate signal box 46 has been re-numbered 412. 

Signal boxes 31, 47, and 423 have been removed from the 
fire houses where they were located and placed on iron posts on 
the sidewalk in front and lighted by red lanterns. 

Six keyless doors have been placed on signal boxes in place 
of the plain key doors, and have proven a check to false alarms. 



388 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



The four-round boxes have been cut down to two and three 
rounds, thereby doing away with unnecessary ringing of bells. 

There has been 13,950 feet of new No. 10 triple braid-cov- 
ered wire run and 1,860 feet of twisted pair copper wire for tele- 
phones, etc. 

Twelve thousand one hundred and forty feet of old bare 
wire has been replaced by new covered wire. 

Eleven thousand and sixty feet of lead-covered cable, con- 
sisting of two, four, six, eight, ten, and twelve conductors, have 
been placed underground on Broadway from Magoun square 
to Arlington line, and the old overhead wires removed. 

The placing of wires underground should be carried along 
as fast as possible, as the removal of overhead wires removes 
the possibility of outside interference and adds to the efficiency 
of the fire alarm system. 

POLICE SIGNAL SYSTEM. 

The police signal system has received its usual attention 
and has given as satisfactory service as can be expected, it hav- 
ing been installed over twenty years ago and being in need of 
a thorough overhauling and the entire system brought up to 
date. 

The register and time clock at the police station have been 
repaired and batteries renewed, but constant attention is re- 
quired to keep the system in working order. 

The equipment consists of the following : Fifty-two signal 
boxes, one four-circuit instrument desk, 125 cells of closed cir- 
cuit batterv. 



Supervision of Poles and Wires on the Streets, Underground Con- 
duits and Wires and Street Lighting. 

Careful attention has been given to the condition of poles 
and wires on the streets and notification immediately given to 
the companies owning them when found defective. All such 
notices have received prompt attention. 

Very little trouble has been experienced with poles and 
wires on the streets, employees from this department taking 
care of any dangerous wires until attended to by the companies 
owning same. 

A large number of defective poles have been replaced or 
removed, and new poles placed in locations granted. 

New Re- Re- Re- 
Poles, placed, moved, set. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co. . 61 24 4 13 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co.. ... 25 83 10 8 

Boston Elevated Railway Co. .... 62 30 1 
Permits given to New England Telephone & Telegraph Co. for 

attachments to Edison Electric Illuminating Co.'s poles . 435 



COMMISSIONER OF ELECTRIC LINES AND LIGHTS. 389 

Permits given to Western Union Telegraph Co. for attachments 

to Edison Electric Illuminating Co.'s poles .... 1 

Permits given to Edison Electric Illuminating Co. for attach- 
ments to New England Telephone & Telegraph Co.'s poles, 25 

The New England Telephone and Telegraph Company has 
removed all its overhead local service wires on Broadway to the 
Arlington line, and its trunk lines will be placed underground in 
a short time. 

The Edison Electric Illuminating Company has removed 
its high tension wires on Broadway as far as Willow avenue, 
and other wires will be placed underground in a short time. 

The Boston Elevated Railway Company has located iron 
poles, for span and feed wires, on Broadway from Grant 
to Bartlett streets, and the high wooden poles are being re- 
moved. 

Pole and line construction done by the various companies 
has been satisfactory, but a large amount of old construction 
should be overhauled. 

Street Lighting. 

The lighting of the streets of the city is very satisfactory, 
but additional lights could be placed in various sections to good 
advantage. 

A new contract having been made with the Edison Electric 
Illuminating Company, the lighting of the streets is accom- 
plished at a much smaller cost than heretofore. 

The rates under the new schedule are as follows: 425 watt 
arc lamps, $36 each per year, and 1J cents per hour per lamp ; 
forty C. P. incandescents, $10.80 each per year, and J cent per 
hour per lamp. On these prices a discount of ten per cent, is 
made. There is also a discount of one cent per hour for incan- 
descents, and five cents per hour for arc lamps for outages. 

Incan- 
Arcs. descents. 
Number of street lights January 1, 1909 . 484 648 

Number of street lights added, 1909 . 11 35 

Number of street lights discontinued . 5 5 

Number of street lights December 31, 1909 490 678 

Electrical Department. 

CREDIT. ; i 

Appropriation . * $8,500 00 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co., grounding 

wires 125 00 

Brown & Simonds Co., fire alarm box . 50 00 

Cochrane Chemical Co. (carboys returned), 11 50 

Total credit , , , , . ; , , - "~~ $8,686 50 



390 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

DEBIT. i 

Salaries $5,342 88 

Wires, insulators, etc 783 48 

Wagon repairs 4 00 

Harnesses and repairing same ... 54 20 

Fire alarm and police signal boxes . . 1,264 25 

Board of horses 431 72 

Incidentals 676 09 

Total debit $8,556 62 

Amount unexpended $129 88 

Underground Construction. 

CREDIT. I 

Appropriation $1,500 00 

Balance unexpended, 1908 .... 3,171 87 

Total credit $4,671 87 

DEBIT. 

Labor $769 20 

Materials 2,965 27 

Incidentals 8 50 

Total debit $3,742 97 



Amount unexpended $928 90 



Street Lights. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation $50,000 00 

DEBIT. 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co., lighting .... $52,298 63 



Amount overdrawn .... = ... $2,298 63 

Recommendations. 

I respectfully recommend that : — 

The old style fire alarm signal boxes, which were installed 
with the original fire alarm system, be gradually replaced by 
new and improved boxes. 

The police signal system be changed from the present 
closed circuit system to the modern open circuit system. 

The ordinances governing the installation of electrical 
wiring in buildings be amended or changed to obtain a more 
strict observance of the rules and regulations laid down by this 
department. 

Additional facilities for transportation be furnished this de- 
partment on account of the rapidly-increasing number of in- 



COMMISSIONER OF ELECTRIC LINES AND LIGHTS. 391 

spections and the large territory to be covered, the work could 
be done more expeditiously. 

Conclusion. 

I wish to thank your honorable board and other officials 
for the many courtesies extended to me, and for your kind as- 
sistance, and I respectfully submit the above for your considera- 
tion. 

Respectfully, 

Walter I. Fuller, 

Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights. 



SOMERVILLE WATER WORKS. 



SOMERVILLE, MIDDLESEX CO., MASSACHUSETTS. 



Area of city, including land and water, about 4.22 square miles. 
Population, estimated, 75,500* 
Entire population on line of pipe and supplied with water* 



Water works owned by City of Somerville. 

Construction commenced in 1868. 

Source of supply : Metropolitan system, taking water of the 

Nashua river at Clinton, Mass. 



Mayor 

Hon. John M. Woods. 

Water Commissioner 

Frank E. Merrill. 



Office of the Water Department, 

Room 10, City Hall. 



Department Buildings and Yard, 

Cedar street, near Broadway, 



REPORT OF THE WATER COMMISSIONER. 



Office of the Water Commissioner, ) 
January, 1910. ^ 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

I present herewith my report for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1909, this being- the thirty-sixth annual report made by 
the water department, and my tenth as water commissioner : — 



Receipts and Expenditures. 

Water bills have been issued as follows : — 

"Annual" water charges, amounting to 
"Additional" water charges, amounting to . 
"Metered" water charges, amounting to 



Abatements on above charges 
Refunds on above charges . 
Abatements on 1908 charges 



$109,875 75 

4,744 46 

109,994 62 



Annual 
and Add'l. 

$1,125 52 
153 36 


Metered. 

$209 89 
8 64 
2 50 


$224,614 83 


$1,278 88 


$221 03 


1,499 91 





Income from sale of water 
Amount received from water service as- 
sessments 

Amount received for labor and materials . 



Refunds on above amounts . 

Total income of water works . 
This amount was used as follows 



$223,114 92 



$3,816 32 
11,281 41 

$15,097 73 
21 63 



15,076 10 
$238,191 02 



For water works purposes : — 

Water works maintenance . ' . . . $25,733 77 

Water works extension 14,198 08 

Miscellaneous accounts 15,097 73 

Interest on water loan bonds . . . 2,460 00 

Maturing water loan bonds . . . 6,000 00 

Metropolitan water works assessment . 112,573 20 

For other municipal purposes : — 

Sewers, maintenance $12,000 00 

Fire department 38,000 00 

Reduction of fundecj debt .... 12,128 24 



$176,062 78 



62,128 24 



$238,191 02 



394 ANNUAL KEPORTS. 

In addition to the appropriations from water income to 
other municipal purposes enumerated above, water has been 
furnished without charge to all the city departments that have 
required its use, and it is paid for out of the income from sale 
of water. ! 



Department Receipts and Disbursements. 

WATER MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT. 

Dr. Cr. 

Amount appropriated by board of aldermen 

from water income .... $30,000 00 

Sundry receipts for labor and materials . 11,281 41 

Materials used in extension of the water 

works 13,279 50 

Amount expended for labor and materials 
for operation, maintenance, and re- 
newal of the water works . . . $25,733 77 

Amount expended for materials used in ex- 
tension of the water works . . . 13,279 50 

Miscellaneous accounts 11,281 41 

Unexpended balance 4,266 23 



$54,560 91 $54,560 91 

WATER WORKS EXTENSION ACCOUNT. 

Dr. Cr. 

Amount appropriated by board of aldermen 

from water income . . . . $15,000 00 

Receipts from 211 water service assess- 
ments of 1909 and 2 of previous years, 3,816 32 

Labor and materials used in extension of 

the water works . . . ' . . $14,198 08 

Miscellaneous accounts 3,816 32 

Unexpended balance 801 92 



$18,816 32 $18,816 32 



Cost of Water Works. 

The total cost of the water works on December 31, 1908, 
as represented by the expenditures from appropria- 
tions for water works extension was .... $908,636 18 

Expended during the year 1909, on extension account . 14,198 08 



Total expenditures, December 31, 1909 . . . $922,834 26 



Water Debt. 

Water loan bonds have been issued on funded debt account 
to the amount of $1,017,000 ; this has been reduced by $961,000, 
leaving the water debt on December 31, 1909, $56,000. 



WATEK DEPARTMENT. 

The outstanding bonds mature as follows 



395 



Year. 


Amount. 


Year. 


Amount. 


1910 


$6,000 


1916 


$5,000 


1911 


6,000 


1917 


5,000 


1912 


6,000 


1918 


5,000 


1913 


6,000 


1919 


4,000 


1914 


6,000 


1920 


2,000 


1915 


5,000 







Water Works Income from 1898 and its Distribution. 

The water income and its distribution from 1898 to 1909, 
inclusive, is shown in the following table : — 

Total water income, years 1898 to 1909, inclusive . . $2,648,925 81 
Distribution: — 

Water Works Account. 

Water Works Construction, Renewal, Main- 
tenance and Operation .... 

Water Bonds 

Interest 

Metropolitan Water Assessments 



$655,033 92 

218,000 00 

74,595 00 

862,474 72 



$1,810,103 64 



Other Municipal Accounts. 



" : r 
i 

Sewers «j 
I 



Construction 

Maintenance 

Bonds 

Interest 

Assessments 



$117,035 65 
122,450 00 

72,000 00 
58,792 00 
31,000 00 



$401,277 65 

Fire Department, Maintenance 279,026 33 

Health Department, Maintenance 7,500 00 

Suppression of Moths . . 1,000 00 

Reduction of Funded Debt 148*229 11 

Unappropriated Balances 1,789 08 



$2,648,925 81 



Extension of Water Distribution System. 

STREET riAINS. 

The total number of feet of new mains laid, including 
hydrant, blow-off and waterpost branches, was 9,160 ; there was 
removed or abandoned 2,046 feet, making the water pipe 
mileage of the city approximately 94.27 miles. 

The most important work of the year in the distribution 
department of the work has been the re-location of the water 
mains and connections made necessary by the elimination of 
the grade crossing of the Fitchburg railroad in Somerville ave- 



396 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

nue. The work has continued at intervals for the greater part 
of the year, in keeping with the progress made by the bridge 
contractors, and is now practically completed, the only large 
portion of the work yet to be done being the pipe line over the 
bridge structure, which cannot be laid until the iron work is in 
place. The trench work for this job has been done by con- 
tractors employed by the Boston & Maine railroad and under 
their supervision, while the pipes have been furnished and laid 
by the water department. The entire cost of the work has 
been charged to the Boston & Maine railroad, and ten per cent, 
of the amount will, under the statutes, be later assessed back 
to the city. The general scheme of the re-construction was a 
double supply, one line running through the low-grade drive- 
way from a point near the beginning of the westerly grade of 
the bridge to a point beyond the beginning of the easterly 
grade, crossing the railroad location under the tracks ; the 
other line commencing and ending at the same points as the 
first one, but lying in the elevated roadway and passing over 
the bridge structure on brackets just outside the easterly side- 
walk. The work in Somerville avenue involved the laying of 
2,842 feet of twelve-inch pipe, 206 feet of six-inch pipe, twenty- 
two feet of four-inch pipe, 166 feet of two-inch pipe, eighteen 
gate valves, twelve liydrants, and two blow-offs, and removing 
1,663 feet of pipe, seven gate valves, and six hydrants. A new 
twelve-inch water pipe 241 feet long was laid through the new 
street formed by the widening of Congress place, connecting 
the main in Linwood street with the high-level pipe line in 
Somerville avenue ; also, a new twelve-inch main 185 feet long 
was laid through the driveway under the bridge connecting the 
Linwood-street main with the low-level pipe line in Somerville 
avenue. Sixty-two feet of pipe were laid in the re-construc- 
tion of the Linwood and Fitchburg-street mains. The large 
service connections to the yards of the North Packing & Pro- 
vision Company, John P. Squire & Co... Boston & Maine rail- 
road, and to the buildings of the Jackson & Newton Company 
and International Harvester Company were cut off from the 
old main and connected with the new pipes, with such changes 
in size and locations as seemed desirable. The original plans 
submitted by the water commissioner for this work were ac- 
cepted in full by the Boston & Maine railroad, and the work has 
been carried on to practical completion with the hearty co- 
operation of their engineering staff. 

Of less magnitude has been the work of re-locating the 
mains on account of the construction of the Lowell-street 
bridge, but a considerable amount of labor has been spent in 
raising 229 feet of old water mains to the new grades in Lowell, 
Princeton, and Vernon streets, and in extending the ten-inch 
pipe in Lowell street for a distance of ninety-two feet to the 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



39? 



southerly abutment of the new bridge, and in re-laying services, 
blow-off and hydrant branches along the line of the re-located 
mains. 

The growth of the city has called for the extension of the 
distribution mains in the following streets : Acadia park, 204 
feet six-inch pipe; Boston avenue, 374 feet eight-inch pipe; 
Chetwynd road, 383 feet eight-inch pipe ; Conwell avenue, 207 
feet ten-inch pipe ; Dickson street, 156 feet six-inch pipe ; Hill 
street, 360 feet six-inch pipe; Kenneson road, 42 feet eight- 
inch pipe; Liberty road, 90 feet two-inch pipe; Mason street, 
189 feet ten-inch pipe; Meacham street, 129 feet two-inch pipe; 
Ossipee road east, 666 feet eight-inch pipe ; Pearson road, 333 
feet eight-inch pipe ; Powder House boulevard, 749 feet ten- 
inch pipe ; Somerville avenue (westerly end), 248 feet six-inch 
pipe ; Talbot avenue, 84 feet twelve-inch pipe ; Victoria street, 
93 feet two-inch pipe ; Walker street, 358 feet eight-inch pipe ; 
Walnut road, 85 feet six-inch and two-inch pipe. In addition 
to the above, 365 feet of pipe of various sizes have been laid on 
short extensions and hydrant, blow-off, and waterpost connec- 
tions. 

Trench work, excavating, and re-filling for water pipes 
was done by contract labor in the following streets and at 
prices named : — 





Feet of 
Trench . 


Cu. 
Yards 
Rock. 


Contractor. 


Trench Work. 


Total Cost of 
Trench Work. 


Average Cost 


Street. 


Earth. 
Lin. Ft. 


Rock. 

Cu. Yd. 

$2.70 

3.00 
2.50 


per foot of 
Trench Work. 


Chetwynd road 

Ossipee road 

east 
Powder House 
boulevard 


343.2 

632. 
665.3 


103.1 

18 
33 


B. Burke . . . 

T. F. Crimmings 
T. F. Crimmings 


$ .28 

.39 
.34 


$374.47 

300.48 
319.39 


$1.09 

0.475 
0.487 



The pipes and all materials required were furnished, and 
the pipe-laying done in each street by the water department. 






Hydrants, Gates, etc. 

Thirty-four fire hydrants were set and sixteen removed, 
making a net addition of eighteen, and the total number in the 
city 1,056. Forty-seven new 7 gate valves of various sizes were 
installed, and fifteen removed or abandoned, the net increase 
in number being thirty-two, and the total number in use 1,454. 
Three blow-offs were installed, one in Acadia park to clear the 
water from the dead end, and two in Somerville avenue to draw 
the water from the pipe over the Fitchburg railroad bridge. 
No new waterposts were installed ; seven were re-set in new 



398 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



locations, and one has been removed temporarily on account 
of the work at the Somerville-avenue railroad crossing. 

Water Services. 

Two hundred and eleven new service pipes were laid dur- 
ing the year, this number being forty-two more than that of the 
previous year. The number of feet of service pipe laid was 
8,016; the total length in the city is approximately seventy- 
eight miles, and the number of house connections 12,018. Ten 
services were discontinued or cut off from the mains where 
their use was no longer required. 

Water Meters. 

Eight hundred and thirty-eight new meters have been in- 
stalled during the year on services not previously metered; 
thirty-two which had been removed for various causes were 
re-set ; forty-eight were removed on account of permanent or 
temporary discontinuance of use of water ; the net increase in 
number of meters in actual service being 822, and the total 
number of such in operation on December 31, 5,147. The 
kinds and sizes of meters now installed are shown in the follow- 
ing table : — 

OPERATING nETERS DECEMBER 31, 1909. 











Size. 








Kind. 
















Total. 


%" 


%" 


1" 


iy 2 " 


2" 


3" 


4" 


6" 


Nash , 


173 
















173 


Empire . . 


1 
















1 


Crown . . . 


6 


5 


3 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


21 


Gem . . . 














1 




1 


Hersey . . 






4 


1 


2 


2 






9 


Hersey Disc 


220 


21 


3 


1 


4 








249 


Torrent . . 
















1 


1 


Trident . . 


260 


42 


20 


6 


5 




1 




334 


Crest . . . 










2 


3 


1 




6 


Union . . . 


15 


13 


7 


1 


6 




1 




43 


Union Special 




16 


2 


2 










20 


Columbia . . 


144 
















144 


King . . . 


444 
















444 


Lambert . . 


2,277 


118 


20 












2,415 


Worthington 




















Disc . . . 


1,286 
















1,286 


Totals . . 


4,825 


215 


59 


13 


21 


7 


5 


2 


5,147 


Motor and ele- 




















vator registers 


















8 




5,155 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



399 



The meters installed in 1909 were classed as follows 

Applications of property owners .... 322 

New services 201 

General installation 315 

Reset 32 

Total 870 

Meters were removed for the following causes: — 

Vacancies and temporary non-use of water . 35 

Services permanently discontinued ... 5 

Replaced by other meters 8 



Total 



48 



The following table gives a summary of the pipes and fix- 
tures of the water system December 31, 1909 : — 



Summary of Pipes and Fixtures. 

Feet of main pipe (approximately) 

Feet of service pipe (approximately) 

Service connections (approximately) 

Public fire hydrants 

Private fire hydrants 

Gates 

Check valves . 

Meters 

Motor registers 

Waterposts 

Blow-offs 

Drinking fountains and troughs 



497,745 

411,966 

12,018 

1,056 

47 

1,454 

7 

5,147 



141 



Maintenance and Operation. 

The fixtures and appurtenances connected with the dis- 
tribution system, hydrants, valves, meters, etc., have had their 
usual inspection, and repairs and changes have been made 
where it has been found necessary. No serious breaks or 
leaks have occurred during the year, and the system is believed 
to be in excellent condition. Eleven joint leaks on main pipes 
and 132 service leaks have been discovered and repaired during 
the year, and 102 service pipes have been replaced. One hun- 
dred and thirty-three meters were found not operating, and 
were removed and repaired, the causes of their defective con- 
dition being classed as follows : Broken disks, twenty-five ; de- 
fective registers, sixteen ; defective gear trains, ten ; worn-out 
gear trains, eleven ; freezing, sixteen ; hot water, four ; dirt, 
sediment, and similar obstructions, nineteen ; miscellaneous de- 
fects in gears, spindles, screws, etc., inside the meters, sixteen ; 
noisy meters, sixteen. 



400 



ANNUAL fiEPOETS. 



The shop, stable, and yard of the department have been 
kept up to their usual' standard, with the possible exception of 
the teaming equipment. The use of motor carriages for some 
of the branches of department work has been tried out during 
the past three years, and while the vehicles used have not been 
of such a type as to give the best possible results, the experi- 
ence with them has fully demonstrated the value and economy 
of such motive power, and it is hoped that, for the good of the 
service, a portion of the horse equipment may soon be sup- 
planted or strengthened by the purchase of two motor vehicles. 
The department shop is well fitted with machinery, tools, and 
skilled labor, so that the ordinary repairs of such vehicles could 
be made in our own plant at minimum expense, and I am con- 
vinced from accumulated experience that the upkeep of a motor 
equipment would be considerably less per year than that of 
horse equipment, and would be of much greater efficiency in 
carrying on certain parts of the department work, especially 
"hurry-up" jobs, emergency work, and other light service. 
The increasing use of water meters requires a large amount of 
additional running about the city for installation, inspection, 
and light repairs, and some provision must at once be made for 
the men in charge of this work to get around speedily, either 
by the purchase of new horses and light wagons, or by motor 
vehicles. Other cities are adopting the latter mode of trans- 
portation, and it is hoped by your commissioner that their pro- 
gressive methods may soon be approved for use, to the needed 
extent, in our own team department. 

Water Assessments and Consumption. 

The annual assessments paid b}^ this city as its propor- 
tionate part of the cost and operation of the metropolitan water 
works are given below : — 



Year. 


Sinking Fu 


nd. Maintenance. 


Interest. 


Total. 


1898 


No division 


made 




$14,250 19 


1899 


a it 


(< 




20,975 58 


1900 


it it 


tt 




28,689 24 


1901 


$12,491 73 


$12,033 79 


$32,291 24 


56,816 76 


1902 


19,014 85 


12,955 64 


30,427 40 


62,397 89 


1903 


15,748 56 


12,763 10 


48,776 77 


77,288 43 


1904 


16,404 42 


15,393 87 


54,938 64 


86,736 93 


1905 


21,358 11 


13,666 71 


55,535 91 


90,560 73 


1906 


22,345 50 


17,412 51 


57,402 07 


97,160 08 


1907 


25,365 30 


18,880 01 


62,089 30 


106,334 61 


1908 


24,865 73 


15,221 12 


68,604 23 


108,691 08 


1909 


24,812 23 


21,220 56 


66,540 41 


112,573 20 




$862,474 72 



Water department. 40i 

There has been credited to the city by the commonwealth 
as its proportion of the amounts received from entrance fees, 
water supplied outside the district, and water furnished to water 
companies the sum of $9,056.10. 

The daily consumption of water in Somerville, as recorded 
by the Venturi meters, operated by the metropolitan water 
works, is shown below by months for the year 1909 : — 

Month. Gallons. Month. Gallons. 

January 6,974,100 July , 6,508,300 

February 6,862,700 August 6,166,300 

March 6,532,300 September 5,959,800 

April 6,272,200 October 6,017,600 

May 6,357,500 November 5,760,700 

June 6,493,900 December 6,016,000 

The total consumption for the year is 2,310,815,000 gallons, 
making an average daily consumption of 6,331,000 gallons. 

The average daily quantity of water used in Somerville 
during 1909 was eighty-four gallons per inhabitant, a decrease 
of five gallons from the previous year's consumption ; the 
average for the entire district was 123 gallons daily per capita. 

The following table shows the daily per capita consumption 
of water in the cities and towns in the metropolitan water dis- 
trict for the year 1909, as registered by the metropolitan 
meters : — 

For the 
City or Town. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Year. 

Boston 166 162 156 155 151 149 148 145 140 138 134 141 149 

Somerville 93 92 87 84 85 86 86 82 79 80 76 79 84 

Maiden 43 43 41 41 41 47 50 48 46 46 44 43 45 

Chelsea 99 98 94 91 86 87 86 88 79 76 72 73 85 

Everett 90 87 81 80 81 84 82 80 75 72 69 73 79 

Quincy 79 80 84 86 88 97 115 114 100 96 93 82 93 

Medford 82 83 81 83 86 87 87 80 77 71 67 67 79 

Melrose 61 61 58 60 64 71 71 66 63 61 60 55 63 

Revere 84 83 77 76 83 97 103 102 89 76 69 73 84 

Watertown 59 60 59 59 61 65 72 64 54 55 54 56 60 

Arlington 68 68 70 71 77 92 115 99 83 78 73 71 81 

Milton 33 36 34 37 42 46 51 46 43 43 37 34 40 

Winthrop 93 96 95 99 103 122 137 110 90 76 68 65 96 

Stoneham 84 84 79 74 85 89 99 105 92 83 82 86 87 

Belmont 62 50 53 56 60 77 91 78 58 61 50 47 62 

Lexington 48 52 59 64 69 84 101 90 75 62 55 50 68 

Nahant 60 52 52 56 58 68 75 68 66 65 74 70 67 

Swampscott 47 45 45 52 53 70 86 77 57 49 46 46 58 

Metropolitan Dist. 136 133 128 127 125 126 127 123 117 115 111 115 123 



102 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The district, in order of consumption, beginning with the 
lowest, stands as follows : — 





Gall 


o n s. 




Gallons. 


City or Town. 


Total 


Per Capita 


City or Town. 


Total Per Capita 




per Day. 


per Day. 




per Day per Day. 


1— Milton 


313,200 


40 


9— Medford 


1,732,300 79 


2— Maiden 


1,848,500 


45 


10 — Arlington . 


... 861,300 81 


3 — Swampscott . 


.. 388,200 


58 


11 — Somerville 


...6,331,000 84 


4 — Watertown . 


.. 755,300 


60 


11 — Revere 


1,248,700 84 


5 — Belmont : . . . 


310,100 


62 


12— Chelsea 


2,869,400 85 




962,300 


63 


13 — Stoneham . 


.. 585.000 87 


7 — Nahant 


124,400 


67 


14 — Quincy . . . 


2,919,000 93 


8 — Lexington . . 


. . 329,400 


68 


15 — Winthrop . 


.. 877,600 96 


9— Everett 


2,641,300 


79 


16 — Boston 


94,029,900 149 






rieterage. 





In accordance with the provisions of the Water Act passed 
by the legislature of 1907, 838 meters were installed, the num- 
ber of services now equipped being about forty-three per cent, 
of the total in use. About fifty-one per cent, of the total re- 
ceipts from sale of water was from unmetered premises, and 
forty-nine per cent, from those that were metered. 

The number of applications for meters was 322, as against 
611 in the previous year, and 315 were set on general installa- 
tion where but 144 were set during 1908. The installation on 
new services increased from 147 in 1908 to 201 during the past 
year. A large number of the meters were set in the district 
bounded by Somerville avenue, Washington street, and Joy 
street, and a number of streets in other parts of the city which 
were partially metered were filled in to completion. 

A new method of billing metered water accounts has been 
devised and put into operation during the past year, and has 
worked very satisfactorily. The city has been divided into 
three districts : District 1, East Somerville, comprising the ter- 
ritory easterly of a line through Walnut, Bow, Hawkins, and 
Washington streets ; District 2, Central Somerville, the terri- 
tory between the above-described line and a line passing 
through Cedar and Mossland streets ; and District 3, W T est 
Somerville, all the territory westerly from the last-described 
line. Meters in District 1 are read in March, June, September, 
and December ; in District 2 in January, April, July, and Octo- 
ber; and in District 3 in February, May, August, and Novem- 
ber ; and bills are rendered on the first day of the month fol- 
lowing that in which they were read. By this method of read- 
ing and billing, an equilibrium of work is established through- 
out the year in the meter accounting department, and the city 
is saved a considerable expense in meter reading and clerical 
employment. ' 



WATER DEPARTMENT. ■ 403 

The water furnished by the Metropolitan water works has 
in general been of a good quality, but during the early part of 
the year much complaint was received on account of a disagree- 
able taste and odor. The trouble was most noticeable in the 
low-service districts of the city, the section supplied by the 
high-service mains from Spot Pond reservoir being practically 
exempt. The disturbance was caused by disagreeable, but 
harmless, microscopic organisms in the water, which disap- 
peared after a few weeks. 

The water consumption dropped from an average of 
eighty-nine in 1908 to eighty-four gallons per capita daily for 
the past year, and there was a general reduction noted in the 
consumption throughout the entire district, due in large part 
undoubtedly to the progressive metering carried on by the 
cities and towns in the district. 

The accompanying tables cover further details of the year's 
work, and are made a part of this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Frank E. Merrill, 

Water Commissioner. 



404 AXXFAL RErORT. 



Gates Set in New Locations. 

Acadia park, 6-inch gate, set 13 feet 4 inches out from west line, on 

north line of Somerville avenue. 
Acadia park, 2-inch gate, set 13 feet 4 inches out from west line and 246 

feet north from Somerville avenue; for blow-off. 
Boston avenue, 2-inch gate, set 17 feet north from Pearson avenue; for 

waterpost. 
Boston avenue, 2-inch gate, set opposite Pritchard avenue; for water- 
post. 
Boston avenue, 8-inch gate, set 13 feet 4 inches out from east line, on 

south line of Frederick avenue. 
Central street, 2-inch gate, set 89 feet north from Highland avenue; for 

waterpost. 
Chetwynd road, 8-inch gate, set 13 feet 4 inches out from south line, on 

west line of Curtis street. 
Congress place, 12-inch gate, set 16 feet 8 inches out from west line, on 

north line of Somerville avenue. 
Congress place, 12-inch gate, set 16 feet 8 inches out from west line, 

on south line of Linwood street. 
Conwell avenue, 10-inch gate, set 13 feet 4 inches out from south line, 

on east line of unnamed street running north from Conwell avenue 

667 feet west from Curtis street. 
Dickson street, 6-inch gate, set 13 feet 4 inches out from west line, on 

south line of Fairmount avenue. 
Fitchburg street (extension into low-grade driveway on southerly side 

of Somerville avenue), 12-inch gate, set on south line of Linwood 

street. 15 feet out from foot of westerly abutment of bridge over 

Fitchburg railroad. 
Hill street. 6-inch gate, set 13 feet 4 inches out from west line, on north 

line of Broadway. 
Hill street, 6-inch gate, set 13 feet 4 inches out from west line, on 

south line of Fairmount avenue. 
Kenneson road, 8-inch gate, set 13 feet 4 inches out from east line, on 

south line of Broadway. 
Landers street, 2-inch gate, set 20 feet out from north line, on west line 

of School street. 
Liberty road, 2-inch gate, set 5 feet 6 inches out from east line, on 

south line of Appleton street. 
Linwood street, 12-inch gate, set 17 feet 6 inches out from south line, 

on west line of Fitchburg street. 
Lowell street, 12-inch gate, set 13 feet 4 inches out from west line and 

17 feet south from north line of Vernon street. 
Medford street, 2-inch gate, set 24 feet north from Highland avenue; 

for waterpost. 
Ossipee road, east, 8-inch gate, set 13 feet 4 inches out from north line, 

on west line of unnamed street about 650 feet east from Packard 

avenue. 
Ossipee road, east, 8-inch gate, set 13 feet 4 inches out from north line, 

on east line of Packard avenue. 
Powder House boulevard, 10-inch gate, set 17 feet out from south line, 

on east line of Packard avenue. 
Powder House boulevard, 10-inch gate, set 17 feet out from south line, 

on east line of unnamed street running south from Powder House 

boulevard about 700 feet east from Packard avenue. 
Princeton street, 6-inch gate, set 13 feet, 4 inches out from south line, on 

west line of Lowell street. 
School street, 2-inch gate, set 188 feet north from Highland avenue; 

for waterpost. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 495 

Somerville avenue, 2-inch gate, set 150 feet west from Congress place; 
for waterpost. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate, set 147 feet west from west line of 
Congress place and 25 feet out from north line of Somerville ave- 
nue; set on main line over bridge, on west side of loop connection. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate, set 12 feet west from top of westerly 
abutment of bridge over Fitchburg railroad and 20 feet out from 
north line of Somerville avenue, on the high grade. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate, set 20 feet east from top of easterly 
abutment of bridge over Fitchburg railroad and 12 feet out from 
north line of Somerville avenue, on the high grade. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate, set 45 feet west from westerly line of 
Squire's box mill and 25 feet out from north line of Somerville 
avenue. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate, set in loop line 134 feet west from west 
line of Congress place and 39 feet out from north line of Somer- 
ville avenue. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate set in loop line 16 feet west from west- 
erly line of Fitchburg railroad location and 7 feet out from south 
line of low-grade driveway, on southerly side of Somerville avenue, 
on westerly side of branch running to Linwood street through 
Fitchburg-street extension. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate, set in loop line 12 feet west from 
westerly line of Fitchburg railroad location and 7 feet out from 
south line of low-grade driveway, on southerly side of Somerville 
avenue, on easterly side of branch running to Linwood street 
through Fitchburg-street extension. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate, set in loop line 128 feet west from 
line of easterly abutment of bridge over Fitchburg railroad and 15 
feet 6 inches out from south line (extended) of low-grade drive- 
way, on southerly side of Somerville avenue; set in reservation 
occupied by spur tracks leading into yard of J. P. Squire & Co., 
2 feet east from easterly line of Fitchburg railroad location and 8 
feet west from gate on pipe running to yard of North Packing & 
Provision Co. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate, set in loop line 13-5 feet east from line 
of easterly abutment of bridge over Fitchburg railroad and 15 feet 
6 inches out from south line of low-grade driveway, on southerly 
side of Somerville avenue; set 5 feet west from gate on branch 
running to J. P. Squire's pumps. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate, set in loop line 7 feet east from east- 
erly end of southerly retaining wall of bridge over Fitchburg rail- 
road and 21 feet 6 inches out from south line of low-grade drive- 
way, on southerly side of Somerville avenue. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate, set in loop line 7 feet east from east- 
erly end of northerly retaining wall of bridge over Fitchburg rail- 
road and 16 feet 6 inches out from north line of Somerville avenue, 
in entrance to low-grade driveway on northerly side of street. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate, set in loop line 11 feet east from foot 
of steps at end of low-grade driveway on northerly side of Somer- 
ville avenue and 7 feet out from the north line of the driveway, on 
easterly side of 12-inch branch running into Boston & Maine rail- 
road yard. 

Somerville avenue. 12-inch gate, set in loop line 1 foot east from foot 
of steps at end of low-grade driveway on northerly side of Som- 
erville avenue and 7 feet out from the north line of the driveway, 
on westerly side of 12-inch branch funning into Boston & Maine 
railroad yard. 



406 i ANNUAL KEPOBTS. . I 

Somerville avenue, 6-inch gate, set 145 feet west from west line of 
Congress place and 11 feet out from south line of Somerville ave- 
nue; set on hydrant branch 1 foot out from the hydrant. 

Somerville avenue, 6-inch gate, set 312 feet west from East Cambridge 
city line and 14 feet out from north line of Somerville avenue; set 
on hydrant branch 3 feet out from the hydrant. 

Somerville avenue, 4-inch gate, set 16 feet west from top of westerly 
abutment of bridge over Fitchburg railroad and 15 feet out from 
north line of Somerville avenue; set on blow-off branch to drain 
pipe running over bridge. 

Somerville avenue, 4-inch gate, set 23 feet east from top of easterly 
abutment of bridge over Fitchburg railroad and 2 feet out from 
north line of Somerville avenue, in sidewalk; set on blow-off 
branch to drain pipe running over bridge. 

Temple street, 2-inch gate, set 31 feet north from Broadway; for 
waterpost. 

Unnamed street off Powder House boulevard, 10-inch gate, set 13 feet 
4 inches out from west line, on south line of Powder House boule- 
vard. 

Walker street, 8-inch gate, set 13 feet 4 inches out from south line, on 
north line of Broadway. 



dates Removed. 

Boston avenue, 2-inch gate removed from opposite Highland road; for 
waterpost. 

Boston avenue, 2-inch gate removed from 17 feet north from Pearson 
avenue; for waterpost. 

Highland avenue, 2-inch gate removed from 15 feet west from Central 
street; for waterpost. 

Highland avenue, 2-inch gate removed from 50 feet west from Putnam 
street; for waterpost. 

Highland avenue, 2-inch gate removed from 44 feet west from Hamlet 
street; for waterpost. 

Linwood street, 6-inch gate removed from west line of Fitchburg street, 
15 feet out from south line of Linwood street. 

Princeton street, 6-inch gate removed from 13 feet 4 inches out from 
south line, on west line of Lowell street. 

Somerville avenue, 2-inch gate removed from 246 feet east from Pop- 
lar street; for waterpost. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate removed from west line of Fitchburg 
street, 25 feet out from north line of Somerville avenue; on old 
line. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate removed from 35 feet east from east- 
erly line of Fitchburg railroad location, 25 feet out from north line 
of Somerville avenue; on old line. 

Somerville avenue, 2-inch gate removed from 175 feet east from Fitch- 
burg railroad crossing; for waterpost. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate removed from 12 feet west from west 
line of house No. 49, 25 feet out from north line of Somerville 
avenue, on westerly side of branch running into Boston & Maine 
railroad yard; on old line. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate removed from 3 feet west from west 
line of house No. 49, 25 feet out from north line of Somerville 
avenue, on easterly side of branch running into Boston & Maine 
railroad yard; on old line. 

Somerville avenue, 6-inch gate removed from hydrant branch from q\<\ 
line 368 feet west from Franklin court, 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



40' 



Temple street, 2-inch gate removed from 124 feet south from Heath 
street; for waterpost. 

GATES— RECAPITULATION. 



Gates. 



Set 
Removed 



1%* 


IVz" 


2" 


3" 


4" 


6" 


8" 


10" 


12" 








10 





2 


7 


6 


4 


18 


— 


— 


8 


— 


— 


3 


— 


— 


4 



Total. 



47 
15 



Net increase in number of gates in 1909 . . .32 
Total number of gates in the city December 31, 1909 . 1,454 

The following changes have been made in locations of 
waterposts : — 

Boston avenue, set 17 feet north from Pearson avenue. 

Boston avenue, set opposite Pritchard avenue. 

Central street, set 89 feet north from Highland avenue. 

Medford street, set 24 feet north from Highland avenue. 

School street, set 188 feet north from Highland avenue. 

Somerville avenue, set 150 feet west from Congress place. 

Temple street, set 31 feet north from Broadway. 

Boston avenue, removed from opposite Highland road. 

Boston avenue, removed from 17 feet north from Pearson avenue. 

Highland avenue, removed from 15 feet west from Central street. 

Highland avenue, removed from 50 feet west from Putnam street. 

Highland avenue, removed from 44 feet west from Hamlet street. 

Somerville avenue, removed from 246 feet east from Poplar street. 

Somerville avenue, removed from 175 feet east from Fitchburg railroad 

crossing. 
Temple street, removed from 124 feet south from Heath street. 



Hydrants Set in New Locations. 

Aberdeen road, 237 feet west from Cedar street, 6-inch Mathews. 
Acadia park, 186 feet north from Somerville avenue, 6-inch Mathews. 
Boston avenue, 289 feet north from Morrison avenue, 6-inch Mathews. 
Bromfield road, 267 feet south from Dearborn road, 6-inch Corey. 
Dickson street, 119 feet south from Fairmount avenue, 6-inch Holyoke 

Compression. 
Kensington avenue, 316 feet north from Broadway, 6-inch Mathews. 
Marion street, 40 feet east from Dimick street, 6-inch Pratt & Cady. 
Mystic avenue, 115 feet east from Austin street, 6-inch Holyoke G. 
Ossipee road, east, 44 feet west from unnamed street 650 feet east from 

Packard avenue, 6-inch Mathews. 
Pearson road, 131 feet south from Dearborn road, 6-inch Corey. 
Pearson road, 436 feet south from Dearborn road, 6-inch Corey. 
Pearson road, 81 feet north from Warner street, 6-inch Corey. 
Powder House boulevard, 319 feet east from Packard avenue, 6-inch 

Holyoke G. 
Princeton street, 175 feet west from Lowell street, 6-inch Corey. 
Sawyer avenue, 25 feet west from Packard avenue, 6-inch Holyoke G. 
Somerville avenue, 96 feet west from Acadia park, 6-inch Holyoke G. 
Somerville avenue, 145 feet west from Congress place, 6-inch Mathews 
Somerville avenue, 13 feet east from Congress place, 6-inch Coffin, 



408 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Somerville avenue, 313 feet east from Congress place, 6-inch Mathews. 
Somerville avenue, 872 feet west from East Cambridge line, 6-inch 

Mathews. 
Somerville avenue, 670 feet west from East Cambridge line, 6-inch 

Holyoke Compression. 
Somerville avenue (No. low level), 650 feet west from East Cambridge 

line, 6-inch Holyoke G. 
Somerville avenue, 312 feet west from East Cambridge line, 6-inch 

Mathews. 
Walnut road, 268 feet west from Walnut street, 6-inch Mathews. 
Whitfield road/ 85 feet west from Packard avenue, 6-inch Holyoke G. 

Hydrants Removed. 

Lowell street, 3 feet south from Princeton street, 6-inch Holyoke G. 

Somerville avenue, 464 feet east from Poplar street, 4-inch Boston 
Machine. 

Somerville avenue, 153 feet west from Linwood street, 6-inch Hol- 
yoke G. 

Somerville avenue, 20 feet east from Fitchburg railroad crossing, 6-inch 
Coffin. 

Somerville avenue, 368 feet west from Franklin court, 6-inch Mathews. 

Somerville avenue, 262 feet west from Franklin court, 6-inch Holyoke G 

Somerville avenue, 23 feet east from Franklin court, 6-inch Mathews. 

Hydrant Renewal Account. 

The following changes have been made in hydrants : — 

Alpine street, 6-inch Chapman hydrant, set 76 feet west from Princeton 

street, in place of 4-inch Bigelow hydrant. 
Conwell avenue, 6-inch Corey hydrant, set 460 feet west from Curtis 

street, in place of 4-inch Bigelow hydrant. 
Cross street, 6-inch Holyoke G. hydrant, set 6 feet north from Pearl 

street, in place of 6-inch Chapman hydrant. 
Fellsway West, 6-inch Corey hydrant, set 11 feet north from Broadway, 

in place of 6-inch Holyoke hydrant. 
Highland avenue, 6-inch Mathews hydrant, set 14 feet west from corner 

of Medford street, in place of 6-inch Pratt & Cady hydrant. 
Highland avenue, 6-inch Mathews hydrant, set 114 feet west from 

School street, in place of 6-inch Holyoke hydrant. 
Medford street, 6-inch Mathews hydrant, set 21 feet north from Som- 
erville avenue, in place of 4-inch Holyoke hydrant. 
South street, 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 25 feet west from Hunting 

street, in place of 6-inch Chapman hydrant. 
Warren avenue, 6-inch Corey hydrant, set 48 feet north from Bow 

street, in place of 6-inch Holyoke G. hydrant. 

Locations of Hydrants. 

Aberdeen road, 237 feet west from Cedar street. 
Acadia park, 186 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Adams street, 11 feet south from Broadway. 

221 feet south from Broadway. 

266 feet north from Medford street. 

10 feet north from Medford street. 
Adrian street, 93 feet east from Marion street. 

220 feet south from Joseph street. | 



street Mains, gates, hydrants, etc., set and removed in 1000. 





DESCRIPTION. 


PIPE. 


GATES. 


HYDRANTS. j BLOW-OFFS. 


WATER- 
POSTS. 


STREET. 


La 


ID. 


Abandoned. 


Set. 


Removed. 


Set. 


Removed. I Set. 


Removed. 


Set. 


Re- 


























moved. 




Size. 


Feet. 


Size. 


Feet. 


Size. 


No. 


Size. 


No. 


Size. 


No. 


Size. 


No. Size. 


No. 


Size. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


Aberdeen road 


Hydrant. 


6" 


24 














6" 


1 














Acadia park 


Street main; from main in Somerville avenue to point 24<;' north from Somerville 


i 6" 


2(14 
59 






6" 


1 
























avenue. 


\ 2" 


































Hydrant. 


6" 


7 














6" 


1 


















Blow-oft. 


2" 


J9 






2'' 


1 












2" 


1 










Alpine street 




















6" 


1 


4" 


1 












Boston avenue 


Street main; from connection with old pipe at point 237' north from Morrison 
avenue to gate set on south line of Frederick avenue. 


8" 


374 






8" 


1 
























Boston avenue 


Hydrant. 


6" 


7 














6" 


1 
















Boston avenue 


Waterposts. 




33 


2" 


44 


- 


2 


2" 


2 








j 








•> 


2 


Knimfield road 


Hydrant. 


6" 


7 














6" 


1 
















Central street 


Waterpost. 


2" 


7 






2 


1 




















1 




Chetwynd road 


Street main; Irom main in Curtis street to point 356' west from Curtis street. 


8" 


383 






8" 
12" 


1 
























Congress place 


Street main; from main in Linwood street to main in Somerville avenue. 


12" 


241 






2 


























Conwell avenue 


Street main; from connection with old main at point ■460' west from Curtis street 
to point 667' west from Curtis street. 


10" 


207 






10" 


1 


























Conwell avenue 


Hydrant. 


















6" 


1 


4" 


1 














Cross street 


Hydrant. 


















6" 


1 


6" 


1 














Die k .on street 


Street main; from main in Fairmount avenue to connection with old pipe 129' 
south from Fairmount avenue. 


6" 


156 






6" 


1 


























Dickson street 


Hydrant- 


G" 


7 














6" 


1 


















Fellsway West 


Hydrant. 


















6" 


1 


6" 


1 














Fitchburg street 


Street main; from main in Linwood street, northerly. 


12" 


32 


6" 


32 






























Fitchburg street ext. 


Street main; from main in Linwood street to main in Somerville avenue, low 


12" 


185 






12" 


1 


























grade driveway. 






































Highland avenue 


Hydrants. 


















6" 


2 


G" 


2 














lli.14bl.1nd avenue 
Hill street 


Waterposts. 






2" 


57 






2 


3 




















3 


Street main; from main in Broadway to main in Fairmount avenue. 


6" 


360 






6" 


2 


























Kenneson road 


Street main; from main in Broadway to point 12' south from Broadway. 


8" 


42 






8" 


1 


























Kensington avenue 


Street main; from point 311' north from Broadway to point 317' north from 
Broadway. 


6" 


6 


































Kensington avenue 


Hydrant. 


f." 


6 














6" 


1 


















Landers street 


Street main; from point 182' west from School street to point 198' west from 


2" 


10 






'- 


1 




























School street. 




































Liberty road 


Street main; from main in Appleton street to point 77' south from Appleton street. 


2" 


90 






2 


1 


























Linwood street 


Street main; from gate on west line of Fitchburg street, westerly 5' and easterly 
25'. 


li? 


5 
25 


6" 


5 


12" 


1 


6" 


1 






















Lowell street 


Street main; from point 31' south from south line of Princeton street to point 
13' north from south line of Princeton street. 


J 10" 


44 


10" 

6" 


44 
5 














6" 


1 














Lowell street 


Street main; from connection with main at point 13' north from south line of 
Princeton street to point 63' north from north line of Princeton street. 


,10" 


92 


































Lowell street 


Gate. 










12" 


1 


























Marion street 


Hydrant. 


6" 


6 














6" 


1 


















Mason street 


Street main; from main in Powder House boulevard to main in Ossipee road, east. 


10" 


189 






10" 


1 


























Meachain street 


Street main; from main in Fremont street to point 117' west from Fremont street. 


2" 


129 


































Medlord street 


Hydrant. 


















6" 


1 


4" 


1 














Medfoid street 


Waterpost. 


2" 


26 






2" 


1 






















1 




Mystic avenue 


Hydrant. 


6" 


13 














6" 


1 


















Ossipee road, East 


Street main; from main in Packard avenue easterly to main in Mason street. 


8" 


666 






8" 


2 








1 


















Ossipee road, East 


Hydrant. 


6" 


7 














6" 


















Pearson road 


Street main; from connection with main 199' south from Dearborn road to connec- 
tion with main 532' south from Dearborn road. 


8" 


333 


































Pearson road 


Hydrants. 


6" 


22 














6" 




















Powder House boulevard 


Street main; from main in Packard avenue to point 729' east from east line of 
Packard avenue. 


10" 


749 






10" 




























Powder House boulevard 


Hydrant. 


6" 


2 














6" 


1 


















Pi im etOIl street 


Street main; from old main at point 175' west from Lowell street to connection 
with relaid main in Lowell street. 


6" 


185 


6" 


185 


6" 


1 


6" 


1 






















Princeton street 


Hydrant. 


6" 


5 














6" 


I 


















Sawyer avenue 


Hydrant. 


6" 


7 














6" 


1 


















School street 


Waterpost, 


2" 


26 






2" 


1 






















1 




Somerville avenue 


Street main; from connection with old main at point 70' west from Beacon terrace 

to point 96' west from west line of Acadia park. 
Hydrant. 


! £ 

( 6" 


248 
6 














6" 


1 


















Somerville avenue 


Street main (account Grade Crossing Elimination); from point in old main 80' 
west from Congress place to top of westerly abutment of bridge, and from 
top of easterly abutment of bridge to point in old main 310' west from East 
Cambridge line. 


12" 


1,256 


12" 


1,509 


12" 


4 


12" 


4 






(6" 


5 










| 


Somerville avenue 


Hydrants (account Grade Crossing Elimination). 


6" 


172 


6" 


128 


6" 

4" 


2 


6" 


1 


0" 





\r 


1 














Somerville avenue 


Blow-offs (account Grade Crossing Elimination). 


{ £ 


22 
156 






" 














2" 


2 










Somerville avenue 


Waterposts (account Grade Crossing Elimination). 


2" 


10 


2" 


26 


2" 


1 


2" 


2 


















1 


2 


Somerville avenue 


Street main (account Grade Crossing Elimination); from connection with old 
main at point 145' west from Congress place to connection with old main at 
point 7' east from easterly end of retaining wall of bridge over Fitchburg 
Railroad. This is a loop line through southerly low grade driveway and 


12" 


1,587 






12" 


9 


































































under F. R. K. tracks. 






































Somerville avenue 


Hydrants (account Grade Crossing Elimination). 


6" 


34 














6" 


1 




1 














South street 


Hydrant. . 


















6" 


1 


6" 














Talbot avenue 


Street main; from point 109' east from Latin Way to point 193' east from Latin 
Way. 


12" 


84 


































Temple street 


Waterpost. 


2" 


11 


2" 


11 


2" 


1 


2 


1 


















1 


1 


Unnamed street off Con- 


Street main; from main in Conwell avenue to point 12' northerly- 


6" 


12 
































well avenue 








































Victoria street 


Street main; from main in Woodstock street to point 66' south from Woodstock 
street. 


2" 


93 


































Walker street 


Street main; from main in Broadway to point 310' north from Broadway. 


8" 


358 






8" 


1 


























Walnut road 


Street main; from connection with main at point 250' west from Walnut street to 
point 335' west from Walnut street. 


\ 2" 


18 
67 


































Walnut road 


Hydrant. 


6" 


17 














6" 


1 


6" 


1 














Warren avenue 


Hydrant. 


















6" 


1 














Whitfield road 


Hydrant. 


6" 


7 














6" 


1 






















9,160 





2,046 




47 




J5 




34 




16 j 


3 






7 


8 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 409 

Albion street, 396 feet west from Central street. 

15 feet west from Centre street. 

217 feet east from Lowell street. 

7 feet west from house No. 110. 

444 feet east from Cedar street. 
Aldersey street, 276 feet west from Walnut street. j 

Allen street, 9 feet north from Charlestown street. 

45 feet west from Somerville avenue. 

323 feet west from Somerville avenue. ' 

Alpine street, 280 feet east from Cedar street. 

76 feet west from Princeton street. 

298 feet west from Lowell street. 
Alston street, 212 feet east from Cross street. 

10 feet west from Shawmut place. 
Ames street, 123 feet west from Central street. 
Appleton street, 3 feet east from Clifton street. 

41 feet west from Willow avenue. 
Arlington street, 36 feet east from Hathorn street. i ' 

Arthur street, 29 feet south from Broadway. 
Ash avenue, 300 feet north from Meacham street. 
Ashland street, 268 feet south from Summer street. 
Auburn avenue, 239 feet west from Cross street. ' j 

481 feet west from Cross street. 
Austin street, 81 feet south from Mystic avenue. j 

66 feet north from Benedict street. 

2 feet north from Broadway. 
Avon street, 233 feet east from Central street. 

572 feet west from School street. 

270 feet west from School street. 
Banks street, 310 feet south from Summer street. 
Bartlett street (Ward 1), 130 feet south from Washington street. 
Bartlett street (Ward 5), 230 feet south from Broadway. 

223 feet north from Medford street. 

15 feet south from Ames street. 

10 feet south from Robinson street. 
Bay State avenue, 39 feet south from Broadway. 

7 feet south from Mallet street. ' 

92 feet north from Kidder avenue. 
Beacon street, 316 feet west from Greenwood terrace. 

10 feet east from Stanford terrace. 

46 feet west from Sacramento street. 

South side Beacon street, 40 feet east from Sacramento street. 

South side Beacon street, 2 feet west from Beckwith circle. 

15 feet west from Kent street. 

4 feet west from Ivaloo street. 

68 feet east from Park street. 

18 feet east from Durham street. 

26 feet east from Washington street. ; 

90 feet east from Calvin street. 

194 feet east from Calvin street. i 

28 feet west from Buckingham street. i 

208 feet east from Buckingham street. ! 

6 feet east from Concord avenue. 
Beech street, 4 feet south from Atherton street. 

31 feet east from Spring street. 
Pelmont street, 206 feet north from Spring Hill terrace. 

241 feet north from Summer street. 

243 feet south from Summer street 



410' ' ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Belmont street, 10 feet north from Belmont place. 

222 feet south from Belmont place. 

185 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Benedict street, 33 feet east from Mystic street. 
Bennett street, 166 feet east from Prospect street. 
Benton road, 2 feet north from Cambria street. 

28 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Berkeley street, 8 feet east from Central street. ' 

150 feet east from Hersey street. 

28 feet west from School street. ' 

212 feet west from Hersey street. 
Billingham street, 126 feet north from William street. 
Bolton street, 203 feet north from Houghton street- 

3 feet south from Oak street. 
Bonair street, 26 feet west from Cross street. 

90 feet east from Autumn street. 

121 feet east from Arthur street. 

67 feet east from Dana street. 

Opposite Melvin street. 

117 feet east from Walnut street. 
Bond street, 63 feet south from Jaques street. 
Bonner avenue, 171 feet north from Washington street. 
Boston avenue, 110 feet south from bridge over Mystic river. 

492 feet north from Gove street. 

65 feet north from Highland road. 

23 feet east from Pearson avenue. 

289 feet north from Morrison avenue. 
Boston street, 11 feet west from Prospect Hill avenue. 

207 feet west from Bigelow street. 

87 feet east from Bigelow street. 

6 feet north from Munroe street. 

Bow street, 102 feet north from Warren avenue. 

23 feet west from Wesley park. 

25 feet east from Bow-street place. 

74 feet north from Walnut street. 
Bow-street place, 193 feet west from Bow street. 
Bowdoin street, 65 feet north from Fremont avenue. 
Bradley street, 26 feet south from Veazie street. 
Brastow avenue, 202 feet east from Porter street. 

115 feet west from Lowell street. 
Broadway, 50 feet east from Mt. Pleasant street. 

20 feet west from George street. 

21 feet west from Broadway place. 
83 feet east from Cutter street. 

7 feet east from Glen street. 
21 feet east from Rush street. 
15 feet west from Cross street. 

7 feet west from Autumn street. 

6 feet west from Montgomery avenue. 

33 feet west from Walnut street. 

4 feet east from Sargent avenue. 

3 feet west from Melvin street. 

157 feet west from Grant street. i 

117 feet east from Marshall street. 
62 feet west from Marshall street. 

4 feet west from School street. 

10 feet west from Thurston street. 

209 feet east from Central street. 

104 feet west from Norwood avenue. 

15 feet west from City road. i 



WATEE DEPARTMENT. > 411 






Broadway, 288 feet east from Cedar street. 
Opposite Cedar street. 

5 feet east from Wilson avenue. 
252 feet west from Wilson avenue. 

115 feet west from Rogers avenue. ; 

236 feet west from Liberty avenue. 
175 feet west from College avenue. 
C feet west from Billingham street. 
9 feet west from Packard avenue. 

32 feet east from Westminster street. 

237 feet east from Endicott avenue. 

6 feet west from Endicott avenue. 

9 feet west from Garrison avenue. 
330 feet west from Waterhouse street. 

Broadway park, near the pond. 

Bromfield road, 179 feet north from Warner street. 

567 feet north from Warner street. 

267 feet south from Dearborn road. 
Brook street, 18 feet west from Rush street. 
Browning road, 302 feet west from Sycamore street. 

136 feet east from Central street. 
Buckingham street, 2 feet south from Dimick street. 
Burnside avenue, 259 feet north from Elm street. 

120 feet south from Summer street. 
Calvin street, 186 feet south from Beacon street. 
Cambria street, 131 feet west from Central street. 
Cameron avenue, 166 feet south from Holland street. 

Opposite Mead street. 

26 feet south from Glendale avenue. 
Campbell park, 258 feet west from Meacham road. 
Cedar street, 226 feet south from Sartwell avenue. 

98 feet north from Sartwell avenue. 
61 feet north from Hall street. 

22 feet south from Highland avenue. 
12 feet north from Highland avenue. 

10 feet north from Albion street. 
124 feet south from Warwick street. 
50 feet north from Clyde street. 

24 feet south from Murdock street. 
270 feet south from Broadway. 
Central street, 50 feet south from Broadway. 
6 feet north from Forster street. 

27 feet north from Vernon street. 

5 feet north from Pembroke street. 
187 feet south from Vernon street. 

9 feet north from Willoughby street. 
92 feet north from Highland avenue. 
9 feet south from Highland avenue. 

6 feet north from Oxford street. 

23 feet south from Avon street. 
14 feet south from Summer street. 

Chandler street, 16 feet south from Broadway. 

206 feet north from Park avenue. 
Chapel street, 14 feet east from Chandler street. 
Charles street, 183 feet south from Washington street. 
Charnwood road, 79 feet west from Hancock street. 
Cherry street, 7 feet south from Sartwell avenue. 

254 feet north from Sartwell avenue. 

252 feet north from Summer street. 
26 feet south from Highland avenue. 



412 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Chester street, 15 feet north from Chester place. 
Chestnut street, 4S0 feet south from Poplar street. 

246 feet south from Poplar street. 
Church street, 9 feet south from Summer street. 

300 feet south from Summer street. 

16 feet south from Somerville avenue. 

29 feet north from Somerville avenue. 

12 feet north from Lake street. 
Claremon street, 255 feet south from Holland street. 
Clarendon avenue, 253 feet south from Broadway. 

Opposite house No. 66. 

Near Cambridge line. 
Clark street, 200 feet west from Newton street. 

412 feet west from Newton street. 
Cleveland street, 192 feet west from Central street. 
Clyde street, 250 feet east from Cedar street. 

Opposite Murdock street. 
College avenue, 12 feet north from Winter street. 

6 feet south from Morrison avenue. 
8 feet south from Hall avenue. 

53 feet west from Francesca avenue. 

Opposite Kenwood street. l 

100 feet west from Broadway. 

405 feet north from Broadway. 

720 feet north from Broadway. 
Columbia street, 3 feet south from Beach avenue. 

8 feet south from Columbia court. 
Columbus avenue, 7 feet north from Washington street. 

150 feet east from Bonner avenue. 

118 feet west from Bonner avenue. 

35 feet west from Stone avenue. 

8 feet east from Walnut street. 
Concord avenue, 154 feet west from Prospect street. 

76 feet east from Concord square. 
On east line of Knapp school. 

313 feet east from Springfield street. 
24 feet east from Springfield street. 

7 feet east from Marion street. 

6 feet south from Hammond street. 

20 feet east from Wyatt street. 
Conwell avenue, 20 feet west from Curtis street. 

460 feet west from Curtis street. 
Conwell street, 6 feet south from Highland avenue. 

3 feet north from Francis street. 
Cooney street, 98 feet north from Line street. 
Cottage avenue, 206 feet west from Russell street. 
Craigie street, 216 feet south from Summer street. 

232 feet north from Kimball street. 

77 feet south from Kimball street. 

126 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Crescent street, 125 feet south from Pearl street. 
Crocker street, 4 feet south from Highland avenue. 

8 feet north from Crown street. 

Cross street, 32 feet north from Cross-street place. 
6 feet north from Pearl street. 
62 feet north from Flint street. 
16 feet north from Gilman street. 

13 feet south from Auburn avenue. 
39 feet north from Alston street. 

Curtis avenue, 206 feet west from Curtis street. 



WATEfc department. 4 13 



Curtis street, G feet north from Broadway. 
3 feet south from Electric avenue. 
137 feet north from Ware street. 

3 feet south from Raymond avenue. 
34 feet south from Professors row. 
225 feet north from Professors row. 

Cutter avenue, 11 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Cutter square, 95 feet west from Cutter avenue. 
Cutter street, 95 feet south from Broadway. 

144 feet south from Broadway. 
Dana street, 18 feet north from Pearl street. 
Dane avenue, 162 feet west from Leland street. 

169 feet east from Dane street. 
Dane street, 9 feet north from Tyler street. 

260 feet south from Skehan street. 

55 feet north from Skehan street. 
Dartmouth street, 184 feet south from Broadway. 

200 feet north from Evergreen avenue. 

53 feet south from Evergreen avenue. 

171 feet north from Medford street. 
Davis square, 45 feet east from Day street. 
Day street, 10 feet south from Davis square. 

Opposite Herbert street. 

195 feet south from Herbert street. 

4 feet north from Orchard street. 
Delaware street, 246 feet east from Aldrich street. 

8 feet south from Pearl street. 
Dell street, 255 feet west from Glen street. 
Derby street, 400 feet east from Temple street. 
Dickinson street, 20 feet east from Beacon street. 

7 feet north from Leon street. 
Dickson street, 119 feet south from Fairmount avenue. 
Dover street, 22 feet south from Davis square. 

203 feet south from Davis square. 

312 feet north from Orchard street. 

3 feet north from Orchard street. 
Durham street, opposite Skehan street. 

5 feet west from Hanson street. 
Earle street, 4 feet east from Ward street. 

Eastman place, 279 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Edmands street, 15 feet south from Broadway. 
Eliot street, 3 feet east from Park street. 
Ellsworth street, 7 feet w r est from Rush street. 
Elm street, 59 feet west from Craigie street. 

17 feet west from Porter street. 

28 feet east from Linden avenue. 

11 feet east from Mossland street. 

9 feet west from Cedar street. 
153 feet east from Cherry street. 
110 feet west from Cherry street. 
14 feet east from Burnside avenue. 
104 feet east from Willow avenue. 
20 feet east from St. James avenue. 
9 feet west from Elston street. 

90 feet west from Windom street. 
30 feet west from Russell street. 
11 feet west from Grove street. 
52 feet west from Chester street. 
Elmwood street, 9 feet south from Holland street. 
300 feet east from Harrison street. 



414 AiSTttUAL REPORTS. 

Elmwood street, 85 feet west from Harrison street. 
Endicott avenue, 422 feet south from Broadway. 
Everett avenue, 5 feet west from Cross street. 

9 feet east from Dana street. 

449 feet west from Cross street. 

Everett street, opposite Emerson street. 
Evergreen avenue, 8 feet east from School street. 

114 feet east from Sycamore street. 
Fairlee street, 134 feet west from Cherry street. 
Fairmount avenue, 280 feet west from Curtis street. 

Opposite Watson street. 
Farm lane, 70 feet north from Sumner street. 

67 feet south from Roberts street. 
Farragut avenue, 258 feet south from Broadway. 

537 feet south from Broadway. 
Fellsway East, 7 feet north from Broadway. 
Fellsway West, 11 feet north from Broadway. 

437 feet south from Mystic avenue. 
Fenwick street, 40 feet north from Broadway. 
Fiske avenue, 120 feet east from Hinckley street. 
Fitchburg street, 395 feet east from Linwood street. 
Flint street, 18 feet east from Flint avenue. 

59 feet east from Cross street. 

30 feet west from Franklin street. 
Florence street, 206 feet south from Perkins street. 

7 feet south from Pearl street. 

453 feet north from Washington street. 
Forster street, opposite Tennyson street. 
Fosket street, 6 feet west from Bay State avenue. 
Francesca avenue, 305 feet east from College avenue. 

7 feet west from Liberty avenue. 
Franklin street, 14 feet north from Arlington street. 

55 feet north from Perkins street. 

76 feet south from Webster street. 

156 feet south from Pearl street. 

80 feet south from Oliver street. 

87 feet south from Palmer avenue. 

29 feet north from Washington street. 
Fremont street, 82 feet north from Main street. 

343 feet north from Main street. 

Opposite Meacham street. 

287 feet north from Meacham street. 

25 feet north from East Albion street. 
Fountain avenue, 280 feet west from Glen street. 
Garden court, 357 feet south from Somerville avenue. 
Garfield avenue, 7 feet north from Broadwa3 r . 

24 feet south from Mystic avenue. 
Garrison avenue, 235 feet south from Broadway. 
Gibbens street, 202 feet west from Central street. 

129 feet west from Benton road. 
Gilman square, opposite Marshall street. 
Gilman street, 103 feet east from Walnut street. 

143 feet east from Jasper street. 

8 feet west from Aldrich street. 
176 feet east from Aldrich street. 
295 feet west from Cross street. 

Glass-house court, 360 feet west from Water street. 
Glen street, 147 feet south from Broadway. 

8 feet north from Brook street. 

6 feet north from Webster street. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. , 415 

Glen street, 1 foot north from Flint street. 
11 feet north from Fountain avenue. 
Glendale avenue, 80 feet west from Cameron avenue. 

8 feet east from Yorktown street. 
Glenwood road, 224 feet south from Broadway. 

16 feet north from Vernon street. ' 

320 feet north from Vernon street. 

467 feet north from Vernon street. 
Gorham street, 310 feet south from Holland street. ! 

67 feet north from Howard street. 
Grand View avenue, 286 feet east from Vinal avenue. 
Granite street, 178 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Grant street, 99 feet south from Mystic avenue. 

2 feet north from Derby street. 
Greene street, 295 feet south from Summer street. 
Greenville street, 148 feet north from Boston street. 

33 feet north from Munroe street. 
Grove street, 163 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Hall avenue, 310 feet east from College avenue. 

306 feet west from Liberty avenue. 

9 feet west from Liberty avenue. 
Hall street, 269 feet west from Cedar street. 
Hamlet street, 321 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Hammond street, 30 feet west from Dickinson street. 
Hancock street, 258 feet south from Summer street. 
Hanson street, 12 feet south from Village street. 

9 feet south from Nevada avenue. 

6 feet south from Skehan street. 
Harrison street, 77 feet east from Kent street. 
Harrison street (Ward 7), 4 feet east from Elmwood street. 
Harvard street, 13 feet north from Beech street. 

23 feet north from Harvard place. 
Hathorn street, 145 feet south from Broadway. 
Hawkins street, 50 feet north from Lake street. 
Hawthorne street, 8 feet east from Cutter avenue. 

209 feet east from West street. 
Heath street, 3 feet west from Temple street. 

308 feet west from West street. 

100 feet west from Bond street. 

4 feet east from Fenwick street. 

5 feet east from Moreland street. 
Henderson street, 107 feet north from Wilton street. 
Herbert street, 163 feet west from Chester street. 

5 feet east from Walnut street. 
Highland avenue, 28 feet west from Hamlet street. 
262 feet west from Walnut street. 

80 feet east from Vinal avenue. '' 

41 feet west from Putnam street. 
75 feet west from Prescott street. 
114 teet west irom School street. 
410 feet west from School street. 
112 feet west from Trull lane. 
171 feet east from Central street. 
214 feet east from Spring Hill terrace. 
23 feet west from Spring Hill terrace. 
20 feet west from Belmont street. i 

4 feet east from Tower street. 
2 feet east from Porter street. 
212 feet east from Cedar street. 
63 feet east from Cherry street. 



416 ANNUAL HEPOliTg. 

Highland avenue, 35 feet east from Hancock street. 

4 feet west from Hancock street. 
44 feet east from Willow avenue. 
3 feet west from Willow avenue. 
59 feet east from West street. 

36 feet west from West street. 

36 feet east from Grove street. 

6 feet west from Grove street. 

218 feet west from Grove street. 

64 feet east from Davis square. 
Highland road, 264 feet north from Morrison avenue. 

83 feet south from Frederick avenue. 

175 feet north from Frederick avenue. 

221 feet south from Boston avenue. 
Hinckley street, 106 feet south from Broadway. 
Holland street, 39 feet west from Dover street. 

8 feet west from Boston & Maine Railroad crossing. 

23 feet south from Winter street. 

5 feet east from Jay street. 

3 feet east from Paulina street, 

94 feet east from Claremon street. 
Holyoke road (E.), 167 feet south from Elm street. 
Holyoke road (W.), 185 feet south from Elm street. 
Homer square, 200 feet west from Bonner avenue. 
Houghton street, 82 feet west from Prospect street. 

3 feet west from Bolton street. ' 

10 feet west from Oak street. 
Howard street, 36 feet west from Thorndike street. 
Howe street, 162 feet east from School street. 
Hudson street, 12 feet east from Waldo street. 

Opposite Benton road. 

294 feet east from Lowell street. 

10 feet west from Lowell street. 

362 feet west from Lowell street. 

675 feet west from Lowell street. 

364 feet east from Cedar street. 

24 feet east from Cedar street. 

Ibbetson street, 256 feet north from Somerville avenue. 

6 feet south from Kimball street. 
Irving street, 6 feet south from Broadway. 

285 feet south from Broadway. 

542 feet north from Holland street. 

190 feet north from Holland street. 
James street, 100 feet north from Pearl street. 
Jaques street, 10 feet west from Fellsway West. 

8 feet west from Grant street. 

360 feet east from Temple street. 

185 feet west from Temple street. 

410 feet east from Bond street. 
Jasper street, 5 feet south from Virginia street. 
Jay street, 82 feet north from Howard street. 
Joseph street, 100 feet west from Adrian street. 
Josephine avenue, 397 feet north from Morrison avenue. 

90 feet south from Frederick avenue. 

129 feet north from Frederick avenue. 

425 feet north from Frederick avenue. 

213 feet south from Broadway. 
Joy street, 34 feet south from Washington street. 

502 feet south from Washington street. 

271 feet north from Poplar street. 



WATER DEPAETMEXT. 417 

Kensington avenue, 6 feet north from Broadway. 

316 feet north from Broadway. 
Kent court, 205 feet west from Kent street. 
Kent street, 38 feet south from Somerville avenue. 

7 feet north from Kent court. 

Kidder avenue, 346 feet east from College avenue. 
Kingman road, 282 feet south from Washington street. 
Kingston street, 95 feet west from Thorndike street. 
Knowlton street, opposite Morton street. 
Lake street, 220 feet west from Hawkins street. 

4 feet east from Carlton street. 
Laurel street, 50 feet north from Greene street. 

8 feet north from Park place. 

Lawrence street, 12 feet south from Richardson street. 
Leland street, 14 feet south from Dane avenue. 
Lesley avenue, 57 feet north from Highland avenue. 
Lexington avenue, 244 feet west from Cedar street. 
200 feet east from Hancock street. 

3 feet west from Hancock street. 

4 feet east of Henry avenue. 

Liberty avenue, 3 feet north from Kidder avenue. 

12 feet north from Mallet street. 
Lincoln avenue, 206 feet west from Mt. Vernon street. 
Lincoln parkway, 150 feet west from Joseph street. 

290 feet east from Wyatt street. 
Lincoln street, 38 feet south from Broadway. 

174 feet north from Perkins street. 
Linden avenue, 118 feet south from Gilson terrace. 

255 feet south from Olive avenue. 

30 feet north from Olive avenue. 
Linden street, 31 feet north from Charlestown street. 

237 feet south from Somerville avenue. 
Line street, 272 feet west from Cooney street. 

100 feet west from Smith avenue. 
Linwood street, 385 feet south from Washington street. 

12 feet north from Linwood terrace. 

48 feet south from Lamson court. 

125 feet north from London street. 

52 feet south from London street. 
2 feet south from Linwood place. 

London street, 383 feet east from Linwood street. 
Loring street, 276 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Lovell street, 41 feet south from Electric avenue. 
Lowden avenue, 85 feet south from Broadway. 

8 feet south from Mallet street. 

178 feet north from Kidder avenue. 

27 feet south from Kidder avenue. 
Lowell street, 1 foot north from Fiske avenue. 

50 feet north from Richardson street. 

183 feet south from Richardson street. 

124 feet south from Wilton street. 

Opposite Vernon street. 

163 feet south from Highland avenue. 

53 feet north from Crown street. 
351 feet south from Summer street. 
16 feet north from Kimball street. 

Madison street, 103 feet west from School street. 

467 feet west from School street. 
Main street, junction with Broadway. 

112 feet west from Mt. Vernon avenue. 



-118 ANNUAL REI>ORTS. 

Main street, 5 feet west from'Moreland street. 
Malloy court, 16 feet south from Somerville avenue. 
Mansfield street, 190 feet north from Somerville avenue. 

189 feet south from Washington street. 
Maple avenue, 294 feet east from School street. 
Maple street, 7 feet south from Jackson street. 

87 feet north from Poplar street. 
Marion street, 31 feet south from Adrian street. 

74 feet north from Wyatt street. 

177 feet south from Wyatt street. 

40 feet east from Dimick street. 
Marshall street, 80 feet south from Stickney avenue. 

30 feet north from Stickney avenue. 

Opposite Howe street. 

5 feet north from Evergreen avenue. 
104 feet south from Mortimer place. 
109 feet north from Oakland avenue. 

Meacham road, 4 feet north from Orchard street. 

97 feet north from Kingston street. 

326 feet east from Lester terrace. 
Meacham street, 14 feet west from Moreland street. 
Mead street, 48 feet east from Claremon street. 
Medford street, 50 feet north from Hennessey court. 

56 feet north from Lowell street. 

14 feet north from Glenwood road. 

16 feet south from Bartlett street. 

6 feet north from Central street. 

19 feet south from Sycamore street. 

15 feet south from Lee street. 

46 feet south from Thurston street. 

5 feet north from School street. 

171 feet north from Marshall street. 

266 feet north from Walnut street. 

3 feet east from Walnut street. 

291 feet south from Walnut street. 

8 feet south from Greenville street. 

13 feet north from Prospect Hill avenue. 

240 feet south from Prospect Hill avenue. 

Opposite Chester avenue. 

216 feet south from Washington street. 

69 feet north from Jackson street. 

21 feet north from Somerville avenue. 

382 feet south from Somerville avenue. 

220 feet north from Ward street. 

55 feet north from Ward street. 

91 feet south from Ward street. 

46 feet south from South street. 

17 feet south from Warren street. 
220 feet south from Warren street. 

Melrose street, 610 feet north from Mystic avenue. 
Merriam street, 25 feet north from Charlestown street. 
Miller street, 300 feet west from Sacramento street. 
Miner street, 137 feet north from Vernon street. 
Mondamin court, 272 feet west from Ivaloo street. 
Monmouth street, 7 feet west from Central street. 

156 feet east from Harvard street. 
Montrose, street, 10 feet east from Sycamore street. 

287 feet east from Sycamore street. 

259 feet west from School street. 
Moore street, 22 feet south from Holland street. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 41 9 

Moore street, 335 feet south from Holland street. 

21 feet north from Mead street. 
Moreland street, 345 feet north from Meacham street. 

3 feet south from East Albion street. 
Morgan street, 125 feet west from Park street. 
Morrison avenue, 124 feet west from Cedar street. 

44 feet east from Pearson avenue. 

124 feet east from Rogers avenue. 
13 feet west from Newberne street. 
183 feet west from Clifton street. 
33 feet west from Grove street. 

Mossland street, 114 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Mt. Pleasant street, 140 feet south from Broadway. 

135 feet north from Perkins street. 
Mt. Vernon avenue, 156 feet north from Heath street. 

38 feet south from Heath street. 
Mt. Vernon street, 246 feet north from Washington street. 

8 feet north from Pearl street. 

7 feet south from Perkins street. 
11 feet south from Lincoln avenue. 

5 feet south from Broadway. 

Munroe street, 203 feet east from Walnut street. 

6 feet west from Bigelow street. 
289 feet west from Boston street. 

Murdock street, 204 feet east from Cedar street. 

610 feet east from Cedar street. 
Museum street, 174 feet west from Beacon street. 
Myrtle street, 218 feet north from Washington street. 

460 feet north from Washington street. 

74 feet south from Pearl street. 

219 feet north from Pearl street. 
Mystic avenue, 90 feet east from Union street. 

3 feet west from Union street. 

438 feet east from Austin street. 

115 feet east from Austin street. 

11 feet west from Fellsway West. 

60 feet west from Temple street. 

25 feet east from Melrose street. 

228 feet west from Melrose street. 

800 feet east from Moreland street. 

544 feet east from Moreland street. 

241 feet east from Moreland street. 

6 feet west from Moreland. street. 

125 feet west from Fremont street. 

Mystic street (Ward 1), 148 feet north from Benedict street. 
Mystic street (Ward 2), 160 feet south from Washington street. 
Nashua street, 190 feet south from Wilton street. 
Newberne street, 62 feet south from Morrison avenue. 
Newbury street, 15 feet south from Holland street. 

260 feet south from Holland street. 

558 feet south from Holland street. 

777 feet south from Holland street. ' 

200 feet north from Cambridge line. ' 

New Cross street, 114 feet north from Broadway. i 

Newton street, 9 feet west from Joseph street. 

9 feet east from Clark street. 

Norfolk street, 27 feet south from Webster avenue. 

227 feet south from Webster avenue. 
North street, 18 feet north from Broadway. 

13 feet north from south line of Russell road. 



420 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

North street, 453 feet north from Raymond avenue. 

190 feet north from city bound No._ 17. 
North Union street, 287 feet north from Mystic avenue. 
Oak street, 8 feet west from Prospect street. 

315 feet north from Houghton street. 
Oakland avenue, 109 feet west from Marshall street. 
Oliver street, 191 feet east from Cross street. 

15 feet east from Glen street. 

7 feet west from Franklin street. 
Orchard street, 8 feet west from Russell street. 

West corner Milton street. 

9 feet east from Chester street. 
Ossipee road, east, 44 feet west from Mason street. 
Ossipee road, 177 feet east from Curtis street. 

139 feet west from Packard avenue. 
Otis street, 12 feet west from Cross street. 

440 feet west from Cross street. 

9 feet east from Dana street. 

6 feet east from Wigglesworth street. 
Oxford street, 280 feet west from School street. 

46 feet east from Trull lane. 
237 feet west from Hersey street. 
Packard avenue, 164 feet south from Electric avenue. 

34 feet north from. Electric avenue. 

35 feet south from Powder House boulevard. 
Park avenue, 83 feet west from College avenue. 

10 feet west from Chandler street. 
Park street, opposite Allen court. 

187 feet north from Beacon street. 

69 feet south from Somerville avenue. 
Partridge avenue, 5 feet south from Broadway. 

26 feet north from Medford street. 

117 feet south from Medford street. 

421 feet south from Medford street. 

276 feet north from Vernon street. 
Paulina street, 184 feet north from Holland street. 

.288 feet south from Broadway. 

5 feet south from Broadway. 

Pearl street, 50 feet west from Crescent street. 

7 feet north from Pinckney street. 
29 feet east from Franklin street. 
Opposite Hillside avenue. 

15 feet west from Glen street. 
90 feet east from Cross street. 
3 feet east from Pearl terrace. 

6 feet west from Walnut street. 
72 feet east from Bradley street. 
110 feet east from Marshall street. 

Pearson avenue, 309 feet north from Morrison avenue. 

44 feet south from Frederick avenue. 

308 feet north from Frederick avenue. 
Pearson road, 127 feet north from Broadway. 

81 feet north from Warner street. 

344 feet north from Warner street. 

436 feet south from Dearborn road. 

131 feet south from Dearborn road. 
Pembroke street, 14 feet east from Tennyson street. 
Perkins street, opposite Myrtle street: 

78 feet east from Florence street. 

24 feet east from Pinckney street. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 421 

Perkins street, 56 feet east from Perkins place. 

21 feet east from Mt. Pleasant street. 

Perry street, 324 feet south from Washington street. 
Pinckney street, 11 feet north from Washington street. 

330 feet south from Pearl street. 

71 feet south from Pearl street. 

203 feet north from Pearl street. 
Pitman street, 180 feet west from Beech street. 
Pleasant avenue, 256 feet west from Walnut street. 
Poplar street, 21 feet west from Joy street. 

22 feet east from Linwood street. 
Porter street, 1 foot north from Mountain avenue. 

282 feet south from Summer street. 

24 feet north from Williams court. 

8 feet north from Parker place. 
Powder House boulevard, 133 feet northwest from Broadway. 

560 feet northwest from Broadway. 

319 feet east from Packard avenue. 

191 feet west from Packard avenue. 

172 feet east from Curtis street. 

197 feet west from Curtis street. 

528 feet west from Curtis street. 
Prescott street, 330 feet south from Highland avenue. 

586 feet south from Highland avenue. 

257 feet north from Summer street. 
Preston road, 269 feet west from School street. 

166 feet south from Summer street. 
Princeton street, 175 feet west from Lowell street. 
Pritchard avenue, 255 feet north from Morrison avenue. 

46 feet north from Frederick avenue. 

168 feet south from Boston avenue. 
Professors row, 39 feet east from College avenue. 

158 feet west from Boston avenue. 

126 feet west from College avenue. 

291 feet west from College avenue. 

548 feet east from Packard avenue. 

156 feet east from Packard avenue. 

3 feet west from Packard avenue. 

296 feet west from Packard avenue. 

113 feet east from Curtis street. 
Prospect Hill avenue, 10 feet north from Munroe street. 
Prospect street, 135 feet north from Bennett street. 

35 feet south from Concord avenue. 

185 feet south from Oak street. 

403 feet south from Oak street. 

63 feet north from Houghton street. 
Putnam street, 116 feet south from Highland avenue. 

420 feet south from Highland avenue. 

612 feet north from Summer street. 

308 feet north from Summer street. 

46 feet north from Summer street. 
Quincy street, 91 feet north from Somerville avenue. 

381 feet north from Somerville avenue. i 

26 feet south from Summer street. 
Raymond avenue, 728 feet west from Curtis street. i 

Richardson street, 11 feet west from Nashua street. 
Richdale avenue, opposite Thurston street. 
Robinson street, 325 feet west from Central street. 
Rogers avenue, 369 feet south from Broadway. 

257 feet north from Frederick avenue. 



422 ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

Rogers avenue, 88 feet south from Frederick avenue. 

255 feet north from Morrison avenue. 
Rossmore street, 244 feet south from Washington street. 
Rush street. 84 feet south from Pearl street. 

11 feet north from "Pearl street. 

128 feet north from Brook street. 
Russell road, 11 feet north from Broadway. 

312 feet north from Broadway. 
Sacramento street, 5 feet south from Miller street. 

128 feet south from Beacon street. 
Sanborn avenue, 55 feet east from Walnut street. 
Sargent avenue, 474 feet south from Broadway. 

361 feet west from Walnut street. 

95 feet west from Walnut street. 
Sawyer avenue, 25 feet west from Packard avenue. 
School street, 31 feet south from Oakland avenue. 

100 feet south from Maple avenue. 

6 feet south from Montrose street. 

128 feet north from Highland avenue. 

88 feet north from Oxford street. ' 

15 feet north from Avon street. 

100 feet south from Summer street. 

93 feet south from Preston road. 
61 feet north from Knapp street. 

Sewall street, 311 feet west from Grant street. 
Shawmut street, 9 feet west from Washington street. 

153 feet west from Shawmut place. 
Simpson avenue, 272 feet south from Broadway. 

142 feet north from Holland street. 
Skehan street, 110 feet east from Hanson street. 
Skilton avenue, on east entrance, 173 feet south from south line of 

Pearl street. 
Somerville avenue, 96 feet west from Acadia park. 

188 feet west from Mossland street. 

308 feet east from Mossland street. 

600 feet east from Mossland street. 

116 feet west from Elm street. 

9 feet east from Ibbetson street. 

77 feet east from Belmont street. 

14 feet west from Garden court. 
133 feet west from Kent street. 
13 feet west from Beech street. 
11 feet east from Central street. 
2 feet west from Abdell street. 

15 feet west from Laurel street. 
86 feet west from Granite street. 
38 feet west from Sherman street. 
76 feet east from Hawkins street. 
185 feet west from Hawkins street. 
88 feet west from Quincy street. 
105 feet east from Carlton street. 
90 feet west from Prospect street. 
28 feet west from Linden street. 

9 feet east from Mystic street. 

94 feet west from Mansfield street. 

126 feet east from Medford street. ■ 

88 feet east from Poplar street. 
145 feet west from Congress place. 
13 feet east from Congress place. 
313 feet east from Congress place. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 423 

Somerville avenue, 872 feet west from East Cambridge line. 

670 feet west from East Cambridge line. 

650 feet west from East Cambridge line. 

312 feet west from East Cambridge line. 

215 feet west from East Cambridge line. ; 

100 feet west from Cambridge line. 
South street, 97 feet west from Bedford street. 

2 feet east from Harding street. 
25 feet west from Hunting street. 
80 feet west from Willow place. 

Spencer avenue, 290 feet west from Cedar street. 

63 feet east from Hancock street. 
Spring street, 10 feet south from Pitman street. 

184 feet north from Beech street. 
Spring Hill terrace, 333 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Springfield street, 140 feet south from Concord avenue. 

21 feet south from Dickinson street. 

177 feet south from Houghton street. 
Stickney avenue, 212 feet west from Marshall street. 
Stone avenue, 120 feet north from Union square. 

275 feet south from Columbus avenue. 
Summer street, 148 feet east from Cutter avenue. 

Opposite Elston street. 

West corner Hancock street. 

34 feet east from Banks street. 
6 feet east from Cherry street. 

6 feet east from Cedar street. ! 

24 feet east from Linden avenue. 
Opposite Craigie street. 

35 feet east from Porter street. ! 

4 feet east from Lowell street. 

3 feet east from Belmont street. 
1 foot west from Spring street. 
53 feet west from Harvard street. 
215 feet east from Harvard street. 
59 feet east from Central street. 
19 feet west from Laurel street. 
52 feet west from Preston road. 
191 feet west from School street. 
8 feet east from School street. 

Summit avenue, 231 feet east from Vinal avenue. 
Sunnyside avenue, 99 feet west from Wigglesworth street. 
Sycamore street, 18 feet south from Broadway. 
62 feet south from Browning road. 

I foot south from Forster street. 

200 feet north from Medford street. 
174 feet south from Medford street. 

Sydney street, 418 feet east from Temple street. 
Talbot avenue, 488 feet east from Packard avenue. 
Taylor street, 14 feet south from Mystic avenue. 
Teele avenue, 174 feet west from Packard avenue. 

201 feet east from Curtis street. 
Temple street, 4 feet north from Broadway. 

123 feet south from Sewall street. 

II feet north from Jaques street. 
6 feet south from Derby street. 

5 feet south from Sydney street. 
Tenney court, 306 feet north from Mystic avenue. 
Tennyson street, 4 feet south from Medford street, 

117 feet north from Pembroke street. 



424 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Thorndike street, 4 feet south from Holland street. 

82 feet north from Kingston street. 
Thorpe place, 269 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Thurston street, 187 feet north from Medford street. 

160 feet south from Evergreen avenue. 

6 feet north from Evergreen avenue. 

348 feet north from Evergreen avenue. 
Tower street, 18 feet north from Crown street, 
lremont street, 9 feet south from Webster avenue. 

454 feet south from Webster avenue. 
Trull street, 3 feet south from Medford street. 

276 feet south from Medford street. 

522 feet north from Vernon street. 

270 feet north from Vernon street. 
Tufts street, 51 feet north from Washington street. 

150 feet south from Glen street. 
43 feet north from Glen street. 
53 feet south from Dell street. 
45 feet south from Cross street. 

Tyler street, 31 feet east from Vine street. 
Union square, 267 feet east from Webster avenue. 

15 feet east from Stone avenue. 

3 feet west from Bow street. 

Centre of square. 
Union street, 3 feet north from Broadway. 

123 feet south from Mystic avenue. 
Veazie street, 1 foot west from James street. 
Vernon street, 72 feet west from Partridge avenue. 

1 foot east from Bartlett street. 

2 feet east from Miner street. 

48 feet west from Central street. 
Victoria street, 255 feet south from Broadway. 
506 feet south from Broadway. 

151 feet north from Woodstock street. 
Villa avenue, 121 feet south from Winslow avenue. 
Vinal avenue, 6 feet south from Highland avenue. 

10 feet north from Pleasant avenue. 

129 feet north from Aldersey street. 

206 feet north from Summer street. 

15 feet north from Summer street. 
Vine street, 15 feet north from Beacon street. 

Opposite Eliot street. 

121 feet south from Tyler street. 

32 feet south from Somerville avenue. 
Virginia street, 45 feet west from Aldrich street. 
Waldo street, 6 feet north from Highland avenue. 
Wallace street, 37 feet south from Broadway. 

395 feet south from Broadway. 

483 feet north from Park avenue. 

166 feet north from Park avenue. 

10 feet north from Holland street. 
Walnut road, 268 feet west from Walnut street. 
Walnut street, 88 feet south from Wellington avenue. 

Opposite Veazie street. 

87 feet north from Gilman street. 

31 feet north from Pleasant avenue. 

12 feet south from Boston street. 
Walter street, 28 feet west from Walnut street. 

50 feet west from Bradley street. 
Ward street, 104 feet west from Medford street. 



; WATER DEPARTMENT. 425 

Ward street, 7 feet east from Emery street. 
Ware street, 258 feet west from Curtis street. 

638 feet west from Curtis street. I 

Warner street, 60 feet north from Broadway. \ ij 

Warren avenue, 5 feet north from Sanborn avenue. ! 

48 feet north from Bow street. 

7 feet south from Columbus avenue. 
Warwick place, 142 feet north from Warwick street. 
Warwick street, 426 feet east from Cedar street. 
Washington street, 69 feet west from Crescent street. 

3 feet west from Waverley street. 

West corner Mt. Vernon street. 

3 feet west from Murray street. 

6 feet west from Florence street. 

15 feet west from Myrtle street. 

2 feet east from Bartlett street. i 
18 feet east from Franklin avenue. 

160 feet east from Franklin street. 

58 feet west from Franklin street. 

50 feet east from Shawmut street. 

37 feet east from Rossmore street. 

78 feebeast from Boston street. 

28 feet west from Mystic street. i 

6 feet west from Clark place. 

156 feet west from Bonner avenue. ) 

6 feet east from Kingman road. 

243 feet east from Parker street. 

50 feet east from Bowdoin street. 

15 feet east from Perry street. ! ) 

9 feet east from Leland street. 

112 feet east from Dane street. 

175 feet west from Dane street. 

45 feet east from Beacon street i 

62 feet east from Line street. 
Water street, 91 feet north from South street. 

254 feet north from South street. 

354 feet north from South street. 
Waterhouse street, 24 feet south from Broadway. 

326 feet south from Broadway. 

630 feet south from Broadway. 
Waverley street, 171 feet south from Washington street. 
Webster avenue, 93 feet south from Washington street. 

12 feet south from Everett street. 

25 feet north from Newton street. 

63 feet north from Prospect street. 
18 feet south from Prospect street. 
78 feet north from Tremont street. 

3 feet north from Beach avenue. 

1 foot south from Columbia court. 
Webster street, 25 feet east from Cross street. 

9 feet east from Rush street. 

Opposite Cutter street. 
Wellington avenue, 15 feet west from Montgomery avenue. 
Wesley street, 200 feet north from Pearl street. 
Wesley park, 16 feet north from Bow street. 

335 feet north from Bow street. 
West street, 2 feet north from Broadway. 
West street (Ward 7), 92 feet south from Highland avenue. 

(Ward 7), 140 feet north from Highland avenue. 
Westminster street, 156 feet south from Electric avenue. 



426 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Westwood road, 90 feet west from Central street. 

58 feet east from Benton road. 
Wheatland street, 129 feet north from Broadway. 

9 feet south from Jaques street. 
73 feet north from Derby street. 
78 feet south from Mystic avenue. 

Whipple street, 101 feet north from Highland avenue. 
Whitfield road, 85 feet west from Packard avenue. 
Wigglesworth street, 14 feet north from Pearl street. 
William street, 8 feet east from Chandler street. 
Willoughby street, 146 feet west from Sycamore street. 
Willow avenue, 14 feet north from Summer street. 

3 feet north from Lexington avenue. 

46 feet south from Morrison avenue. 

42 feet south from Fosket street. 

85 feet south from Frederick avenue. 

171 feet north from Frederick avenue. 

Opposite Mallet street. 
Wilton street, 6 feet east from Nashua street. 

10 feet east from Lawrence street. 
Windom street, 7 feet south from Summer street. 
Windsor road, 86 feet east from Willow avenue. 

45 feet west from Hancock street. 
Winslow avenue, 145 feet east from College avenue. 

5 feet west from Grove street. 

224 feet east from Grove street. 

8 feet west from Clifton street. 
Winter street, 130 feet east from Holland street. ^ 

Winter Hill circle, 178 feet north from Broadway. 
Woodbine street, 222 feet west from Centre street. 
Wyatt street, 8 feet south from Taunton street. 

List of Private Hydrants Supplied from the City 
of Somerville ilains. 

John P. Squire & Co. 10 

North Packing and Provision Co. 10 

New England Dressed Meat and Wool Co. 5 

Boston & Maine Railroad 8 

Union Glass Works 1 

Fresh Pond Ice Co. 1 

American Tube Works 2 

Middlesex Bleachery 3 

Boston Elevated Railway Co. 1 

Metropolitan Sewerage Pumping Station 1 

Middlesex Paper Co 2 

Derby Desk Co. . .1 

M. W. Carr & Co 2 

Locations of Waterposts. 

1 — Albion street, 83 feet west from Centre street. 

2 — Appleton street, 49 feet west from Willow avenue. i 

3 — Bartlett street, 26 feet south from Broadway. 

4 — Beacon street, 33 feet north from Concord avenue. 

5 — Beacon street, 135 feet east from Washington street. 

6 — Beacon street, 33 feet west from Vine street. 

7 — Beacon street, 94 feet east from Sacramento street. 

8 — Bolton street, opposite Baxter school. 






WATER DEPARTMENT. 427 

9 — Bonair street, 19 feet west from Wigglesworth street. 
10 — Bond street, 14 feet north from Broadway. 
11 — Boston avenue, opposite Pritchard avenue. , 

12 — Boston street, 107 feet west from Greenville street. 
13 — Broadway, 75 feet west from Winthrop avenue. ' 

14 — Broadway, 6 feet west from Farm lane. 
15 — Broadway, 6 feet west from Irving street. 
16 — Broadway, 120 feet west from Clarendon avenue. 
17 — Broadway, 20 feet west from North street. 
18 — Cameron avenue, 6 feet north from Glendale avenue. 
19 — Cedar street, 96 feet south from Morrison avenue. 
20 — Central street, 89 feet north from Highland avenue. 
21 — Cherry street, 161 feet south from Fairlee street. 
22 — Cleveland street, 169 feet east from Harvard street. 
23 — College avenue, opposite Morrison avenue. 
24 — College avenue, 5 feet south from Kenwood street. 
25 — Columbus avenue, 54 feet east from Walnut street. 
26 — Concord avenue, opposite Knapp school. 
27 — Curtis street, 50 feet east from Professors row. 
28 — Dana street, 30 feet east from Pearl street. 
29 — Elm street, 25 feet west from Burnside avenue. 
30 — Flint street, 47 feet east from Cross street. 
31 — Franklin street, 127 feet south from Broadway. 
32 — Frederick avenue, 66 feet east from Willow avenue. 
33 — Gilman street, 63 feet east from Walnut street. 
34 — Grove street, 19 feet south from Highland avenue. 
35 — Jaques street, 159 feet west from Grant street. 
36 — Laurel street, 20 feet south from Summer street. 
37 — Liberty avenue, 46 feet south from Broadway. 
38 — Linwood street, 70 feet west from Poplar street. 
39 — Lowell street, opposite Crown street. 
40 — Lowell street, 34 feet north from Highland avenue. 
41 — Lowell street, 102 feet north of Wilton street. 
42 — Medford street, 35 feet east from Ward street. 
43 — Medford street, 24 feet north from Highland avenue. 
44 — Medford street, at Gilman square. 
45 — Medford street, 19 feet east from Glenwood road. 
46 — Montrose street, 204 feet west from School street. 
47 — Moreland street, 28 feet north from Meacham street. 
48 — Mt. Vernon street, 71 feet south from Broadway. 
49 — Mystic avenue, 33 feet west from Union street. 
50 — New Cross street, 64 feet north from Broadway. 
51 — Orchard street, 107 feet west from Dover street. 
52 — Otis street, 127 feet west from Cross street. 

53 — Packard avenue, 55 feet southwest from Powder House boulevard. 
54 — Paulina street, 26 feet east from Holland street. 
55 — Pearl street, 28 feet east from Myrtle street. 
56 — Pleasant avenue, 104 feet west from Walnut street. 
57 — Prospect street, 30 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
58 — Putnam street, 96 feet north from Summer street. 
59 — School street, 116 feet south from Broadway. 
60 — School street, 188 feet north from Highland avenue. 
61 — School street, 50 feet north from Berkeley street. 
62 — Shawmut street, 74 feet north from Shawmut place. 
63 — Somerville avenue, 150 feet west from Congress place. 
64 — Somerville avenue, 89 feet east from Mystic street 
65 — Somerville avenue, 119 feet west from School street. 
66 — Somerville avenue, 35 feet east from Central street, 
67 — Somerville avenue, 92 feet west from Kent street. 
68 — Somerville avenue, 120 feet west from Oak square. ! 



428 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



69 — Somerville avenue, 42 feet east from Mossland street. 

70 — Summer street, 14 feet east from Belmont street. 

71 — Summer street, 32 feet east from Cedar street. 

72 — Summer street, 35 feet east from Cutter avenue. 

73 — Sycamore street, 28 feet- west from Medford street. 

74 — Temple street, 31 feet north from Broadway. 

75 — Tremont street, 120 feet south from Webster avenue. 

76 — Tufts street, 114 feet east from Cross street. 

77 — Vernon street, 45 feet west from Central street. 

78 — Washington street, 96 feet west from Myrtle street. 

79 — Washington street, 7 feet west from Boston street. 

80 — Washington street, 34 feet west from Union square. 

81 — Washington street, opposite Leland street. 

82 — Wheatland street, 30 feet south from Mystic avenue. 

Locations of Drinking Fountains. 

Broadway, opposite park, near Winthrop avenue . H 
Union square, junction Somerville avenue and 

Washington street H 

Union square, in front of Hill building . . . D I 

Lincoln park D 

Gilman square D I 

Cutter square C 

Davis square, in front of Medina building . . D I 

Teele square H 

H, horse trough ; D, drinking fountain; I, ice water ; C, combination trough and drinking 
fountain. 



Summary of Statistics 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1909. 

In form recommended by the New England Water Works Association. 

SOMERVILLE WATER WORKS. 

SOMERVILLE, MIDDLESEX COUNTY, MASS. 
GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1905, 69,272. I ! 

Date of construction: commenced in 1868. 
By whom owned: City of Somerville. 
Source of supply: Metropolitan water system. 

Mode of supply: Water is delivered into the city's mains, under 
both high and low pressures, by the Metropolitan Water Works. 

STATISTICS OF CONSUMPTION OF WATER. 

1. Estimated total population at date, 75,500. 

2. Estimated population on lines of pipe, 75,500. 

3. Estimated population supplied, 75,500. 

4. Total consumption for the year, 2,310,815,000 gallons. 

7. Average daily consumption, 6,331,000 gallons. 

8. Gallons per day to each inhabitant, 84. 



STATISTICS RELATING: TO DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM, 

MAINS. 

1. Kind of pipe, cast-iron. 

2. Sizes, from 4-inch to 20-inch. 



Water department. 429 

3. Extended 7,114 feet during year. 

5. Total now in use, 94.27 miles. 

7. Number of leaks per mile, 0.12. 

9. Number of hydrants added during year (public and private), 18. 

10. Number of hydrants (public and private) now in use, 1,103. 

11. Number of stop gates added during year, 32. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use, 1,454. 

14. Number of blow-offs, 141. 

15. Range of pressure on mains, 35 pounds to 100 pounds. 

SERVICES. 

16. Kind of pipe: Lead; wrought iron — lead-lined; wrought iron— 
cement-lined; cast iron. 

17. Sizes, one-half to six inches. 

18. Extended 8,016 feet. 

20. Total now in use, 78 miles. 

21. Number of service taps added during the year, 211; discon- 
tinued, 10. 

22. Number now in use, 12,018. 

24. Average cost of service for the year, $20.28. 

25. Number of meters added, 870; discontinued, 48. 

26. Number now in use, 5,155. , 
27 Percentage of services metered, 43. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water, 49. 

29. Number of motors and elevators added, 0. 

30. Number now in use, 8 (included in number of meters). 



430 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Office of Chief of Fire Department, 
Somerville, Mass., December 31, 1909. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you the annual report 
of the fire department for the year ending December 31, 
1909 :— 



Fire Alarms. 



Number of bell alarms 
Number of still alarms 

Total alarms 
Number less than 1908 
Value of buildings at risk 
Damage to buildings 
Insurance on buildings 
Value of contents 
Damage to contents 
Insurance on contents 
Total value of risks 
Total damage . 
Total insurance 



215 
157 



372 
35 

$368,900 00 
33,649 72 

260,382 87 

159,600 00 
34,808 06 
78,683 60 

528,500 00 
68,457 78 

339,066 47 



Manual Force. 

The manual force of the department consists of 116 men, 
divided into companies as follows : — 

Permanent 

Men. Callmen, 

Chief engineer 1 

Assistant engineer 1 

Engine Company No. 1 7 7 

Engine Company No. 2 7 5 

Engine Company No. 4 6 8 

Engine Company No. 6. . . .". . . . 6 5 

Hose and Chemical Company No. 7 3 5 

Hose Company No. 2 3 6 

Hose Company No. 3 ..3 5 

Hose Company No. 5 3 5 

Ladder and Chemical Company No. 1 .... 3 10 

Ladder Company No. 2 3 10 

Chemical Company A 3 

Chief driver 1 

Total 50 66 



432 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Apparatus in Service. 



Steam fire engines 

Chemical engine ..... 
Combination chemical and hose wagons 
Ladder trucks . . . 
Ladder truck with chemical tank . 
Hose wagons 



Apparatus in Reserve. 

Steam fire engine in need of new boiler . 

Hose wagons 

Ladder truck . 



Horses. 

There are forty-two horses owned and maintained by the 
department. 



Bell Alarms and Causes Thereof. 

Accidental 

Automobile .... 

Bonfires ..... 

Baker's oven .... 

Clothing falling on stove . 

Children playing with matches 

Chimney fires .... 

Combustion .... 

Cleaning clothes with naphtha . 

Curtain in contact with gas light 

Candle upset in chair 

Chair near stove 

Defective chimney 

Electric wires 

Electric car . 

Elevated wires under railroad bridge 

Fat boiling over 

Firecrackers on roof . 

Firecracker in lace curtain 

Fire in dump 

Fires in Medford 

Fires in Cambridge . 

Filling alcohol lamp . 

False alarms 

Grass fires . 

Hot ashes on floor 

Hot ashes in barrel 

Horse kicking over lamp 

Incendiary 

Kerosene lamp upset 

Kerosene oil heaters . 

Lighting matches going to closet 

Match in waste barrel 

Overheated oil stove . 

Overheated coal stove 

Overheated furnace . 



3 
2 
3 
1 
1 

15 
8 
9 
3 
3 
1 
1 
4 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
1 
2 
4 
2 
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32 
5 
3 
2 
1 
7 
9 
2 
3 
2 
3 
4 
2 



Carried forward 



152 



CHIEF ENGINEER, EIRE DEPARTMENT. 



m 



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Rats and matches .... 
Rags used for wiping stove 

Smoking in bed 

Stepping on snap match 
Smoke from stove .... 
Smoke from chimney- 
Spark in wood spittoon and sawdust 
Spark in charcoal .... 
Spark on awning .... 
Spark on roof from chimney- 
Spark from tobacco pipe . 
Sulphur candle on stand . 
Spark from engine on railroad 
Thawing water pipe .... 
Throwing lighted match on roof 
Unknown 



152 
5 
2 
2 
2 
2 
4 
1 
1 
1 
9 

10 
1 

12 
4 
2 
5 



Total 



•215 



434 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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James R. Hopkins, Chief Engineer, Fire Department. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE. 



Office of Chief of Police, ) 
. City of Somerville, January 1, 1910. ) 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen of the 

City of Somerville: — 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to present a report of the 
work of the police department for the year ending December 
31, 1909:— 

Arrests. 

Whole number of arrests made 1,715 

On warrant 1,157 

On summons 558 

1,715 

Males . , 1,598 

Females 117 

1,715 

Americans 1,056 

Foreign born 659 

1,715 

Residents 1,175 

Non-residents 540 

1,715 

Offences Against the Person. 

Abduction .. . . 1 

Assault . . 6 

Assault and battery 178 

Assault with dangerous weapon 5 

Assault, felonious 1 

Manslaughter 2 

Mayhem 1 

Murder 5 

Robbery, attempt 1 

Threats 7 

207 

Offences Against Property. 

Arson 2 

Attempt to wreck a railroad train 3 

Breaking and entering 77 

Breaking glass 4 

Conspiracy - 1 

Concealment of property held on conditional sale . . 1 

Illegally moving baggage 1 

Injury to building 2 

Injury to personal property 6 

Injury to real estate 1 

Larceny 133 

Larceny, attempt 1 

i 

Carried forward 



436 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward 
Larceny in building 
Malicious mischief 
Registered milk cans, unlawful use of 
Receiving stolen goods 
Selling leased goods 

Trespass 

Trespass with intent to steal 
Unlawful appropriation of a horse 
Unlawful use of a horse 



232 
14 
8 
2 
7 
1 
23 
1 
6 
3 



297 



Offences Against Public Order. 



Adultery 

Auto laws, violation of 

Bastardy 

Bigamy 

Cigarette law, violation of 

City ordinances, violation of 

Concealed weapons, carrying 

Cruelty to animals 

Disorderly conduct in a public conveyance 

Disturbing the peace . 

Dogs, unlicensed . 

Drunkenness 

Drunkenness, common 

Escape from Liversidge Institute of Industry 

Escaped prisoners from Industrial School for 

False alarm of fire 

Fornication . . . 

Gaming house, keeping 

Indecent exposure 

Insane .... 

Lewdness 

Lewd cohabitation 

Liquor laws, violation of 

Lord's Day, violation of 

Milk laws, violation of 

Neglected children 

Neglect to support family 

Not being a registered veterinary 

Oleomargarine laws, violation of 

Peddling, unlicensed 

Perjury 

Profanity 

Runaway boys .... 
Rules of Metropolitan Park Commis 

Safe keeping 

Selling adulterated drugs 

Sodomy 

Storing gasoline, without a permit 
Stubbornness .... 

Umvholesome fish, in possession of 
United States army deserter 
Uttering forged check . 
Uttering forged order . 

Vagrants 

Walking on railroad track . 



Boys 



sion, 



violation 



of 



3 

46 
5 
1 
2 

00 
1 
5 
1 

14 

5 

719 

17 
2 
2 

11 
2 
2 
2 
4 
3 
1 

32 

81 
6 

23 

54 
1 
2 
6 
1 
1 
3 
4 
3 
1 
1 
1 

14 
1 
1 
2 
2 

18 

15 



1,211 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 



437 



Arrests for offences against the person .... 207 

Arrests for offences against property .... 297 

Arrests for offences against public order . . . 1,211 

Released by probation officer 65 

Delivered to other officers . 29 

Delivered to East Cambridge jail 2 

Delivered to Fort Banks 1 

Delivered to superior court 6 

Cases in which nolle prosequi was entered ... 7 

Whole number of arrests made 1,715 

Released and delivered to other officers and places, etc., 110 



1,715 



110 



Number of cases held for trial 1,605 

272 of the above number of cases were juveniles and delinquents. 



Miscellaneous Reports. 



Abandoned infant found 

Accidents reported 

Alarms given for fire 

Amount of property reported stolen 

Amount of property recovered 

Amount of property reported lost 

Buildings found open and secured 

Dead infant found .... 

Defective bridges reported 

Defective electric and telephone wires 

Defective electric and telephone poles 

Defective hydrants . 

Defective sidewalks reported 

Defective streets reported 

Defective voting list 

Disturbances suppressed 

Dogs killed 

Fence dangerous 

Fires extinguished without an alarm 

Fire alarm box glass broken 

Gas leaks reported 

Number of larcenies reported 

Obstructions in streets reported . 

Obstruction in sidewalk reported 

Obstruction on sidewalk not lighted 

Panes of glass broken . 

Persons missing 

Persons assisted home . 

Runaway boys found 

Sign boards defective 

Street lights not lighted 

Suicide .... 

Suicide, attempt 

Trees broken and dangero.us 

Tree guard defective 

Water gate projections above sidewalk 

Water pipes leaking . 



1 

37 

12 

$7,577.67 

$3,208.81 

$8.00 

454 

1 

3 

36 

4 

1 

250 

152 

1 

2 

9 

1 

6 

1 

4 

339 

31 

1 

1 

7 

1 

2 

2 

5 

5,929 

1 

1 

41 

1 

6 

124 



438 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Police Signal Service and Ambulance Reports 

Number of on duty reports made by the patrolmen 
Number of runs made with patrol wagon .... 
Number of prisoners conveyed to station in patrol wagon 
Number of miles run with" the patrol wagon 

Number of telephone calls 

Number of persons carried in the ambulance . 



218,945 

864 

916 

1,437 

22,751 

590 



Offical Roster of Department. 

Charles A. Kendall, Chief of Police. 

Robert R. Perry, Captain. Edward McGarr, Sergeant. 

Dennis Kelley, Lieutenant. George H. Carleton, Sergeant. 

Eugene A. Carter, Lieutenant James M. Harmon, Sergeant. 

Charles E. Woodman, Lieutenant. John A. Ray, Sergeant. 

Thomas Damery, Inspector. 



PATROLMEN. 



No. 1 Edward M. Carter. 

" 2 George L. Smith. 

" 3 Francis A. Perkins. 

" 4 William H. Johnston. 

" 5 Jacob W. Skinner. 

" 6 Theodore E. Heron. 

" 7 David A. Bolton. 

" 8 Michael T. Kennedy. 

" 9 Ezra A. Dodge. 

" 10 Charles W. Stevens. 

" 11 Daniel G. Simons. 

" 12 Samuel Burns. 

" 13 Frederick H. Googins. 

" 14 Jotham Chisholm. 

" 15 William J. Davidson. 

" 16 Elmer E. Drew. 

" 17 John A. Dadmun. 

" 18 Eugene A. Woodsum. 

" 19 George L. Rice. 

" 20 Mvron S. Gott. 

" 21 Herbert Hilton. 

" 22 Charles W. Reick. 

" 23 Frank C. Hopkins. 

" 24 Charles W. Allen. 

" 25 Hudson M. Howe. 

" 26 Ernest S. Goff. 

" 27 Sanford S. Lewis. 

" 28 Frank H. Graves. 

" 29 Henry A. Sudbey. 



No. 30 Harvey R. Fuller. 

" 31 Thomas F. McNamara. 

" 32 Louis F. Arnold. 

" 33 Charles S. Johnston. 

" 34 James M. Lynch. 

" 35 Martin Sharry. 

" 36 Robert T. Blair. 

" 37 Ernest Howard. 

" 38 Claude L. Crossman. 

" 39 John J. Cummings. 

" 40 Lemuel J. Simons. 

" 41 Edmund J. Keane. 

" 42 Denis Neylon. 

" 43 Denis Downey. 

" 44 Edward M. Davies. 

" 45 George A. C. Peters. 

" 46 James E. Phillips. 

" 47 Louis J. Belzarini. 

" 48 Walter Reed. 

" 49 Dennis G. Mulqueeney. 

" 50 Patrick J. Doolin. 

*' 51 Joseph J. Burns. 

" 52 Edward J. Hopkins. 

" 53 William G. Kenney. 

" 54 Walter L. Groves. 

" 55 Frederick G. Jones. 

" 56 Joseph A. Dwyer. 

" 57 Thomas P. Walsh. 

" 58 Clyde W. Steeves. 



RESERVE MEN. 



No. 59 Augustine J. Fitzpatrick. 
" 60 Patrick McGrath. 
" 61 William E. Taylor. 
" 62 Bernard McCabe. 



63 Harry C. Young. 

64 Robert D. Dewar. 

65 Peter Moore. 



Edward E. Ware. 
Martin E. Driscoll. 



PATROL DRIVERS. 

John J. Scannell. 



Minnie F. Woodland, Matron, 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 439 



PENSIONERS. 



Melville C. Parkhurst. Ira S. Carleton. 

George W. Bean. James J. Pollard. 

John E. Fuller. Albion L. Staples. i 

The following patrolmen resigned during the year : — 

Henry Y. Gilson, resigned March 25, 1909. 
William J. Sutherland, resigned May 13, 1909. 

Reserve Men Thomas P. Walsh and Clyde W. Steeves were ap- 
pointed regular patrolmen July 22, 1909. 



Performance of Duties. 

Several times during the year a larger part of the force 
were on duty together, notably the dedication of the Soldiers' 
and Sailors' Monument and the big football games. All of the 
officers performed their work in a creditable manner. 



Police Building and Equipment. 

February 27, 1909, your humble servant took charge of 
the department and found the interior of the building occupied 
by the police and the equipment in a dilapidated condition. 



Improvements. 

The chief's, captain's and inspector's offices have been thor- 
oughly cleaned, painted, and woodwork newly finished, also the 
furniture in them. 

The captain's main office has had a wood and iron grill 
work partition put in, separating the officer in charge from the 
public. 

The cells in the lock-up were thoroughly cleaned. 

A partition has been put in the sleeping quarters on the 
first floor, and the sleeping quarters on this and the second 
floor are kept in a cleanly condition. 

A telephone has been installed in the chiefs residence. 

A new cabinet for index description cards and for the 
finger print system has been installed. 

The patrol wagon, ambulance and pung have been newly 
repaired, painted and varnished and a top put on the patrol 
wagon. 

The uniforms have been changed to more modern ideas. 

A new saddle horse and equipment were purchased and a 
mounted officer has been on duty nearly all of the time, in the 
western part of the city, 



440 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Recommendations. 



I respectfully ask for your consideration the advisability 
of the purchase of patrol and ambulance automobiles to replace 
the horses and wagons now in use. The horses are practically 
unfit for this service, owing to the long runs and steep hills. 

The building of a sub-station at West Somerville. 

Some means of conveyance for the head of the department, 
that he may visit all parts of the city, at any time. 

Placing more signal boxes in different parts of the city. 

Replacing the signal system with a more modern one. 

The brick cells in the lock-up should be replaced with steel 
cages, new system of plumbing and a cement floor, so that this 
part of the building can be readily cleaned at any time. 

Separate quarters for female and minor prisoners. 

A competent matron should be on duty all of the time. 

The addition of more men in order that an officer may be 
on duty all of the time in Davis, Teele, Magoun, and Gilman 
Squares. 

Conclusion. 

To the Mayor, Honorable John M. Woods, I wish to ex- 
press my heartfelt thanks for his interest, kindly advice and 
hearty support in all matters concerning the welfare of this de- 
partment, to the end that all of the residents of Somerville may 
have an orderly, cleanly and well-governed city in which to live. 

To the members of the board of aldermen and the heads 
of other departments with whom I have had relations connected 
with this department, my sincere thanks are due. 

To all of the members of the police department, who have 
assisted me in the administration of its affairs, I am truly 
grateful and tender my thanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles A. Kendall, 

Chief of Police. 



REPORT OF SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND flEASURES. 



Office of Sealer of Weights and Measures, | 
City Hall Annex, Somerville, January 1, 1910. j 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: — 

The following report of the sealer of weights and measures 
for the year 1909 is respectfully submitted: — 

Section 21, chapter 62, of the Revised Laws provides that 
sealers of weights and measures shall annually give public 
notice by advertisement, or by posting, in one or more public 
places in their respective cities and towns, notices to all in- 
habitants or persons having usual places of business therein who 
use weights, measures or balances for the purpose of selling 
goods, wares, merchandise or other commodities or for public 
weighing to bring in their weights, measures and balances to 
be adjusted and sealed. Such sealers shall attend in one or 
more convenient places, and shall adjust, seal and record all 
weights, measures and balances so brought in. 

Section 34 of the same chapter provides that each sealer of 
weights and measures, including the county treasurers, shall re- 
ceive a fee of one dollar for sealing each platform balance if 
weighing five thousand pounds or more, and fifty cents if weigh- 
ing less than that amount, and three cents each for sealing all 
other weights, measures, scales, beams or balances. He shall 
also have a reasonable compensation for all necessary repairs, 
alterations and adjustments made by him. 

Where weights, measures and balances are sealed as pro- 
vided in Section 21 (that is, brought to the office), no fee is 
charged for sealing. 

_ In compliance with the foregoing Section 21, the customary 
notice was given by advertising in the Somerville Journal and 
the Somerville Reporter in March, 1909. 

During the year the sealer visited all places in the city 
where goods were bought or sold, tested all scales, weights and 
measures, sealed those which were found correct, and con- 
demned all found beyond repair and useless. 

One hundred and seventy-eight scales, weights and meas- 
ures were adjusted before sealing, twenty-nine scales were 
tagged for repairs, twelve of which were repaired as ordered, 
and the remaining seventeen put out of use. 

Work done in weights and measures during the year 
1909: — , & J 



U2 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



- 


No. of Tests 
No. of Tests Outside of 
in the Office. Office. 


Total No. 

of Tests in 

and Outside 

of Office. 


Number of scales sealed .... 
Number of weights sealed 
Number of dry measures sealed 
Number of tin liquid measures sealed 
Number of glass jars sealed 
Number of yard sticks sealed . 
Number sealed, miscellaneous . 
Number of coal baskets sealed . 


291 

240 

698 

596 

114,628 

6 

5 

22 


1,360 

3,928 

1,105 

1,403 



134 

5 






Total number of all kinds sealed 


116,486 


7,935 


124,421 


Number of scales adjusted and sealed 
Number of weights adjusted and sealed . 
Number of dry measures adjusted and 

sealed 

Number of liquid measures adjusted and 

sealed 


29 
39 

6 

8 


47 

44 

4 

1 




Total number adjusted and sealed 


82 


96 


178 


Number of scales tagged for repairs 
Number of scales repaired as ordered 


6 
3 


23 
9 




Total number tagged and repaired . 


9 


32 


41 


Number of scales condemned . 
Number of weights condemned 
Number of dry measures condemned 
Number of liquid measures condemned . 
Number of yard sticks condemned . 
Number of coal baskets condemned 


7 


7 

1,288 



1 


3 


15 

11 








Total number condemned . 


1,303 


29 


1,332 




117,880 


8,092 


Total number tested in and out of office 


... 


125,972 


Receipts, for the year 1909 : — 








Appropriation 

Received fees for sealing and adjusting 


$1,800 00 
503 32 


$2,303 32 


Expenditures for year 1909 : — 

Printing books and supplies . 
Amount paid for team .... 
Amount paid for helper .... 

Salary of sealer 


] 


$21 30 
144 32 

282 50 

27 00 

700 00 

1,100 00 


Total expenditures .... 






$2,275 12 



Unexpended balance 



$28 20 

John H. Dusseault, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



Somerville, January 10, 1910. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville: — 

The following is my report as city solicitor for the year 
1909 :— 

Abolition of Grade Crossings. The work of abolishing the 
crossing at Somerville avenue is nearly completed. Many 
claims for land damages have been adjusted by me with the ap- 
proval in writing first obtained from the railroad companies, 
the street railway company and the state. Six suits for land 
damages are now pending, brought by owners with whom no 
satisfactory adjustment could be made. 

Hearings before the special commissioners on the abolition 
of grade crossings at Medford street, Webster avenue, Dane 
street and Park street were completed during the year and 
their report has been filed in court. It provides for the aboli- 
tion of all these crossings. It is probable that a decree on the 
report will soon be made. 

Lowell-Street Bridges. An act was secured from the legis- 
lature authorizing the construction by the city of bridges across 
the railroad tracks at Lowell street. The railroad companies 
are to pay $15,000 toward the cost of construction. See chap- 
ter 307 of the Acts of the year 1909. Considerable progress 
has been made in the work, and agreements for the adjustment 
of land damages have been made with the owners of most of 
the estates that are damaged. 

Mystic-Avenue Bridge. As the result of many hearings, a 
bridge over the railroad tracks at Mystic avenue was ordered 
early in the year by the railroad commissioners, acting under 
the authority of chapter 47 of the Acts of the year 1909. Special 
commissioners appointed by the Superior Court later deter- 
mined that the cost of constructing the bridge should be paid 
as follows: — 

Railroad companies 67 per cent. 

Street railway company 18% " " 

City of Boston 10 " " 

City of Somerville 4y 2 " " 

Their report, which has been approved by the court, also 
provides that: "The surface of the bridge and its approaches 
shall be maintained and kept in repair as follows: So much 
thereof as shall be occupied by the tracks of the West End 
btreet Railway Company, the Boston Elevated Railway Com- 



444 ! ANNUAL REPORTS. 

pany, Lessee, including the space between the rails of its tracks, 
and the approaches thereto shall be maintained and kept in re- 
pair by the said West End Street Railway Company, the Boston 
Elevated Railway Company, Lessee ; so much thereof as shall 
lie within the limits of the City of Somerville with the ap- 
proaches thereof, except such part as shall be occupied by the 
tracks of the West End Street Railway Company, the Boston 
Elevated Railway Company, Lessee, including the space be- 
tween the rails of its tracks, shall be maintained and kept in re- 
pair by the City of Somerville ; so much thereof as shall lie with- 
in the limits of the City of Boston with the approaches thereto, 
except such part thereof as shall be occupied by the tracks of 
the West End Street Railway, the Boston Elevated Railway 
Company, Lessee, and the space between the rails of its tracks, 
shall be maintained and kept in repair by the City of Boston." 

Cases in Court. Three actions brought for injuries claimed 
to have been received by reason of defects in public ways were 
settled for $150, $175 and $600, respectively. Another action 
of the same nature was tried in the police court of Somerville 
and decided in favor of the city. An action brought by the city 
of Chelsea for expenses incurred in the care of a person infected 
with the smallpox, having a settlement in this city, was settled 
for $200. An action brought against the city, the collector of 
taxes and a constable for false arrest on a warrant for the col- 
lection of a poll tax was settled for $125. Two actions brought 
for land damages in connection with the laying out of Cleve- 
land street and Vine street were adjusted by setting off better- 
ment assessments, and another action of the same nature was 
settled for $500. A test case brought by the city against the 
state to collect for services of the city physician, rendered to 
poor persons having no settlement, was discontinued without 
costs, the subject matter having been disposed of by chapter 292 
of the Acts of the year 1909. 

Electric Railroad. Many hearings were held by the railroad 
commissioners on a petition for the construction of an electric 
railroad from Lowell and Lawrence to Boston through this 
city. I took part in the opposition to the petition. 

Very respectfully, 

Frank W. Kaan, 

City Solicitor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



Office of the City Clerk, 
January 1, 1910. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: — 

Gentlemen, — The following is respectfully submitted as the 
thirty-eighth annual report of the city clerk of the city of Som- 
erville, and is for the year ending December 31, 1909: — 

The receipts and payments were as follows: — 

Receipts. 

Balance from year 1908, being for dog li- 
censes issued in December, 1908: — 
3 males at $2.00 .... $6 00 

3 females at $5.00 ... 15 00 

$21 00 

Less city clerk's fees paid to the city 

treasurer in December, 1908, 6 at $.20, 1 20 



For dog licenses issued in 1909: — 
1,450 males at $2.00 . 
295 females at $5.00 . 
88 spayed at $2.00 . 
1 breeder's license at $25.00 
1 breeder's license at $50.00 



$2,900 00 

1,475 00 

176 00 

25 00 

50 00 



Recording mortgages, assignments, etc., 

807 papers $487 50 

Certificates of marriage, intentions, 768 

and 1 duplicate at $1.00 ... 769 00 

Furnishing copies of records . . . 110 50 

Licenses:— 
Amusements, — 
29 monthly licenses at $4.00 . $116 00 
35 licenses at $1.00 . . . 35 00 
3 licenses for fractional 
parts of months . . . 3 23 

154 23 



Auctioneers, 21 at $2.00 .... 42 00 

Billiard and pool tables and bowling 

alleys, 20 licenses for 52 tables and 

8 alleys, at $2.00 .... 120 00 

Drivers, 9 at $1.00 9 00 

Fireworks, 49 at $1.00 .... 49 00 

Hackney carriages, 6 licenses for 15 

carriages at $1.00 .... 15 00 

Intelligence offices, 6 at $2.00 ... 12 00 

Collect junk, 26 at $10.00 . . $260 00 
Paid back on 2 refused in 

1908 20 00 



T . , $240 00 

Junk shop, 1 at $25.00 . . 25 00 



265 00 



$19 80 



$4,626 00 



Amounts carried forward .... $2,033 23 $4,645 80 



446 



AtiiSTTTAL EEPOE^. 



Amounts brought forward 
Private detective, 1 at $10.00 (refused 

and money not called for) 
Slaughtering, 6 at $1.00 . . . $6 00 
1 refused and money not 
called for .... 1 00 



Street musicians, 16 licenses for 32 per- 

• sons at $.50 

Wagons, 59 licenses for 126 wagons at 

$1.00 

Wagon stands, 4 at $1.00 
Permits to transport liquors, 14 

at $1.00 $14 00 

6 refused and money not called 

for 6 00 



$20 00 
Paid back on 10 refused in 1908, 10 00 



Recording and issuing sixth-class liquor 

licenses, 39 at $1.00 . 
Filing certificates, 2 at $.50 
Repairing and sale of junk badges . 
Sale of old ballots . . • . 

Interest on deposits .... 



Total receipts 



,033 23 


10 00 


7 00 


16 00 


126 00 
4 00 



$4,645 80 



10 00 

39 00 
1 00 
1 75 
3 00 

10 57 



2,261 55 
$6,907 35 



Payments. 

To Joseph O. Hayden, county treasurer, 
June 1 and December 1, receipts for 
dog licenses from December 1, 1908, 
to November 30, 1909, both inclusive: — 
1,443 males at $2.00 ..... $2,886 00 

297 females at $5.00 1,485 00 

88 spayed at $2.00 176 00 

1 breeder's license at $25.00 ... 25 00 

1 breeder's license at $50.00 ... 50 00 

$4,622 00 
Less city clerk's fees, 1,830 at $.20 . . 366 00 

To the city treasurer, monthly: — 

City clerk's fees for issuing and recording 

dog licenses, 1,835 at $.20 ^ ... $367 00 

All the receipts above specified, except 

for dog licenses 2,261 55 



Total payments 

Balance, January 1, 1910, being for dog li- 
censes issued in December, 1909: — 

10 males at $2.00 

1 female at $5.00 



Amount carried forward 



$20 00 
5 00 



$25 00 



$4,256 00 



2,628 55 
$6,884 55 



$25 00 



CITY CLERK. 4:4:1 



Amount brought forward . . . . $25 00 

Less city clerk's fees paid to the city 

treasurer, 11 at $.20 .... 2 20 



$22 80 



Licenses and Permits. 

Besides the licenses mentioned in the foregoing list of re- 
ceipts, licenses and permits have been granted by the board of 
aldermen and issued without charge, as follows: — 

Amusements (fees remitted) : — 

Children under fifteen to take part in entertainments . . 3 

Somerville High School Athletic Association, ball games . 35 

Auctioneers (to veterans of the Civil War) • 3 

Innholders . 3 

Innholder, transferred to new owner 1 

Common victuallers 70 

Common victuallers, transferred to new owners .... 3 

Drain layers 7 

Drain layers, bond not filed 1 

Newsboys 83 

Junk collectors, to cry calling in streets 26 

To cry goods in streets 57 

To cry aloud to announce calling as umbrella menders . . 3 
To ring bell in streets: — 

Ice cream venders . 5 

Scissors' sharpeners 7 

Umbrella mender 1 

To set up and use engines: — 

Boiler 1 

Electric motors, 29 licenses for 38 motors . . . . . 38 

Gas engines 2 

Steam engines ..." 2 

To blast rock or stone '. 1 

To blast rock or stone, bond not filed 1 

To erect or use buildings for gasoline 10 

To erect or use buildings for garages 30 

To maintain projections over sidewalks: — 

Arc light, 1 permit for 2 lights 2 

* Awning 1 

Barber's pole 1 

Clock signs 2 

Electric signs 5 

Signs 17 

To erect derricks and guy wires 1 

To construct trap and pipe under sidewalk 1 

To move buildings through streets, 1 permit for 4 buildings . 4 

To move buildings through streets, bond not filed ... 1 

To parade in streets 2 

To hold open-air meetings 2 

Approval of location of stable 1 

To keep lying-in hospitals 3 

Gas and Pole Locations. 

The Cambridge Gas Light Company and the Charlestown 
Gas and Electric Company have been granted permission to 
lay gas mains in sundry streets. 



448 ANNUAL IMPOSTS. 

Permission has also been given The Edison Electric Illumi- 
nating Company of Boston and The New England Telephone 
and Telegraph Company of Massachusetts for the erection of 
poles for the support of wires, and the West End Street Rail- 
way Company for track locations and electric rights in various 
streets. 

In every case of such permission to use the streets a suit- 
able agreement for the protection of the interests of the city 
must be filed with the city clerk before the order can become 
operative. 

Births. 

1909. 

Number of births reported by physicians and midwives for 
1909:— 

Males ... 832 

Females 750 

A canvass of the city is at present being made under the di- 
rection of the city clerk as required by section 5, chapter 29, of 
the Revised Laws, to ascertain the facts required for record 
relative to all children born therein during the year. 

As the information derived from such canvass will not be 
available in time sufficient for its incorporation in this report, 
a statement in full of the births of 1909 will be given in the city 
clerk's report for the year 1910. 

1908. 

The following is a statement in full of the births for 1908: — 

Number of births (exclusive of still-births) in Somerville in 1908 

registered 1,739 

Less than previous year 8 

Males 897 

Females 842 

1,739 

Born of American parents 662 

Born of foreign parents 672 

Born of American father and foreign mother . . . 202 
Born of foreign father and American mother . . . 188 
Born of American mother and father of unknown na- 
tionality ... 12 

Born of foreign mother and father of unknown na- 
tionality 3 

1,739 

Number of still-births in Somerville in 1908 registered ... 70 
Number of births in other places in 1908 registered . , .201 

2,010 
Number reported by both canvasser and physician or 

midwife 1,440 

Number reported by canvasser alone .... '290 

Number reported by physician or midwife ... 172 

Carried forward 1,902 



CITY CLERK. 



449 



Brought forward 1,902 

Number reported by clerk or registrar of other place 

and canvasser 41 

Number reported by clerk or registrar of other place 

and physician 12 

Number reported by clerk or registrar of other place, 

canvasser and physician 4 

Number reported by clerk or registrar of other place . 39 

Number of still-births taken from death records . . 12 

Number of cases of twins 



2,010 
11 



riarriages. 

Number of intention certificates issued in 1909 
More than previous year .... 

Marriages registered 

More than previous year .... 

Both parties American 

Both parties foreign 

American groom and foreign bride 
Foreign groom and American bride 



449 

180 

106 

98 



First marriage of 
Second marriage of 
Third marriage of . 



1,470 

188 



768 
21 

833 
13 



couples 



833 couples 



Deaths. 

(Exclusive of still-births.) 

Number of deaths in Somerville in 1909 
More than previous year 

Males 

Females 

Under ten years of age . 
10 and under 20 years of age 
20 and under 30 years of age 
30 and under 40 years of age 
40 and under 50 years of age 
50 and under 60 years of age 
60 and under 70 years of age 
70 and under 80 years of age 
80 and under 90 years of age 
90 years of age and over 

Age of oldest person deceased 

Born in Somerville 

Born in other places in the United States 

Of foreign birth 

Birthplace unknown 

Number of deaths in January 
" February 
" " " March 
" " " April 
" " " May . 
" " " June . 
" " " July . 



471 
517 

250 
38 
52 
72 
73 
94 
145 
175 
75 
14 

yrs. 
257 
404 



90 
109 
97 
86 
87 
78 
54 



988 
85 



988 



988 



988 



Carried forward 



601 



450 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forw 


r ard 


601 


Number of dea 


ths 


in August 


87 


it <•- t< 




" September 


62 


n a (t 




" October 


68 


u u « 




" November . 


83 


(( tt li 




" December . 


. . 87 



988 

The number of still-births recorded during the year was 
sixty-four. In addition to the above, 188 deaths which occurred 
elsewhere were recorded in Somerville, almost the entire num- 
ber of persons deceased having been residents of this city. 



CITY CLERK. 



451 



Assessed Polls and Registered Voters. 

MEN'S LISTS. 





Precinct. 


As- 
sessed 
Polls, 
May 

1, 
1909. 


Registered Voters. 


Ward. 


Nov. 

18, 

1908. 


Re- 
vised 
Lists 

of 
Julv 

20,' 
1909. 


Added 

in 
Sept. 

and 
Oct., 
1909. 


Oct. 
13, 

1909. 


Added 

in 
Nov., 
1909. 


Nov. 

17, 

1909. 


Voted 
Nov. 

2, 
1909. 


Voted 

Dec. 

14, 

1909. 


Wardl . . 
" 1 . • 
" 1 . . 
" 1 . • 


Precinct 1 ... 

2 . . . 

3 . . . 

4 . . . 


1,243 
521 
545 
616 


681 
330 
337 
332 


600 
277 

302 

284 


40 

8 

15 

8 


640 
285 
317 
292 


-i 

3 

18 


640 
284 
320 
310 


455 
203 
232 
221 


401 
171 
224 
249 




2,925 


1,680 


1,463 


71 


1,534 


20 


1,554 


1,111 


1,045 


Ward 2 . . 
" 2 . . 
" 2 . . 


Precinct 1 ... 

2 . . . 

3 . . . 


1,113 

1,402 

850 


416 
675 
371 


367 
593 
339 


25 
51 
33 


392 
644 
372 


10 

5 

12 


402 
649 
384 


313 

505 
272 


225 
341 
230 




3,365 


1,462 


1,299 


109 


1,408 


27 


1,435 


1,090 


796 


Ward 3 . . 
" 3 . . 


Precinct 1 ... 
2 . . . 


1,007 
1,201 


745 
774 


702 
707 


30 
45 


732 
752 


6 


738 
752 


537 
570 


382 
442 




12,208 


1,519 


1,409 


75 


1,484 


6 


1,490 


1,107 


824 


Ward 4 . . 
" 4 . . 


Precinct 1 ... 
" 2 . . . 


1,335 
973 


860 
656 


778 
592 


44 
35 


822 
627 


1 
2 


823 
629 


609 
478 


417 
335 




2,308 


1,516 


1,370 


79 


1,449 


3 


1,452 


1,087 


752 


Ward 5 . . 
" 5 . . 
•• 5 . . 


Precinct 1 . . . 

2 . . . 

3 . . . 


1,387 
699 
934 


946 
450 
593 


889 
402 
526 


52 
26 
21 


941 

428 
547 


1 
7 
7 


942 
435 
554 


735 

320 
405 


531 

285 
367 




3,020 


1,989 


1,817 


99 


1,916 


15 


1,931 


1,460 


1,183 


Ward 6 . . 
" 6 . . 
" 6 . . 


Precinct 1 . . . 

" 2 . . . 

3 . . . 


1,442 
1,228 
1,067 


906 
776 
722 


829 
690 
649 


25 
69 

68 


854 
759 
717 


7 
4 

1 


861 
763 
718 


582 
567 
519 


444 

359 
312 




3,737 


2,404 


2,168 


162 


2,330 


12 


2,342 


1,668 


1,115 


Ward 7 . . 
- 7 . . 

" 7 . . 


Precinct 1 . . . 
" 2 . . . 
" 3 . . . 


1,534 

982 

1,056 


991 

584 
632 


916 
544 
595 


87 
56 
62 


1,003 
GOO 
657 


5 
2 
8 


1,008 

- 60^ 

665 


714 
447 
500 


539 
349 

358 




3,572 


2,207 


2,055 


205 


2,260 


15 


2,275 


1,661 


1,246 




21,135 


12,777 


11,581 


800 


12,381 


98 


12,479 


9,184 


6,961 



452 



AtttfTJAL REPORTS. 



WOMEN'S VOTING LISTS. 



Ward. 


Precinct. 


Nov. 

18, 
1908. 


Revised 

Lists of 

July 20, 

1909. 


Added in 
Sept. 

and Oct., 
1909. 


October 
13, 

1909. 


Added 

in Nov., 

1909. 


Nov. 

1", 

1909. 


Voted 
Decem- 
ber 14, 
1909. 


Wardl • • • 


Precinct 1 


23 


23 




23 


23 


46 


39 


" 1 • • • 


2 . 


4 


4 




4 




4 


2 


" 1 . . . 


" 3 . 


9 


9 




9 


2 


11 


5 


" 1 . . . 


4 . 


26 


22 




22 




22 


12 




62 


58 




58 


25 


83 


58 


Ward 2 . . . 


Precinct 1 


4 


3 




3 


, . 


3 




" 2 . . . 


2 . 


5 


3 




3 




3 




" 2 . . . 


3 . 


1 


1 




1 




1 


•• 




10 


7 




i 


•• 


7 


• • 


Ward 3 . . . 


Precinct 1 . 


34 


33 




33 


1 


34 


1 


" 3 . . . 


2 . 


46 
80 


43 




43 


•• 


43 


3 




76 




76 


1 


77 


4 


Ward 4 . . . 


Precinct 1 . 


18 


17 




17 


1 


18 


1 


" 4 . . . 


2 . 


17 


17 




17 


1 


18 


4 




35 


34 




34 


2 


36 


5 


Ward 5 . • . 


Precinct 1 . 


37 


34 




34 




34 


3 


" 5 . . . 


" 2 . 


9 


7 


4 


11 


i 


12 


7 


" 5 . . . 


3 . 


11 


8 




8 




8 


1 




57 


49 


4 


53 


l 


54 


11 


Ward 6 . . . 


Precinct 1 


60 


P8 




58 


l 


59 


3 


" 6 . . . 


2 . 


13 


10 


3 


13 


l 


14 


2 


" 6 . . . 


3 . 


2 


2 


1 


3 




3 


1 




75 


70 


4 


74 


2 


76 


6 


Ward 7 . . . 


Precinct 1 . 


72 


67 


8 


75 


48 


123 


108 


" 7 . . . 


'« 2 . 


64 


54 


6 


60 


22 


82 


61 


" 7 . . . 


3 . 


38 


35 


1 


36 


3 


39 


26 




174 
493 


156 


15 


171 


73 


244 


195 




450 


23 


473 


104 


577 


279 









CITY CLERK. 



453 



Elections. 

The following is a statement of the votes cast, in the sev- 
eral wards of the city, for the candidates for the various offices, 
at the state election held November 2, 1909 : — 











Wards 








j 


Candidate. 


Party. 
















•< 
H 
O 

H 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


GOVERNOR. 




















Eben S. Draper, 


Republican, 


537 


292 


750 


776 


948 


1,063 


1,203 


5,569 


John A. Nicholls, 


Prohibition, 


11 


3 


19 


20 


19 


30 


37 


139 


Moritz E. Ruther, 


\ Socialist 
J Labor, 


8 


6 


1 


4 


10 


6 


5 


40 


James H. Vahey, 


Democratic, 


502 


751 


299 


233 


436 


506 


c52 


3,079 


Daniel A. White, 


Socialist, 


22 


15 


18 


23 


23 


31 


35 


167 


Charles A. Grimmons, 














1 




1 


Blank, 




31 


23 


20 


31 


24 


31 


29 


189 


LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR. 


















Eugene N. Foss, 


Democratic, 


489 


743 


331 


225 


475 


527 


397 


3,187 


Louis A. Frothingham 


, Republican, 


560 


293 


729 


803 


924 


1,044 


1,159 


5,512 


George G. Hall, 


Socialist, 


21 


18 


21 


20 


16 


32 


30 


158 


Ernest R. Knipe, 


Prohibition, 


9 


2 


9 


14 


16 


19 


27 


96 


Lawrence Yates, 


( Socialist 
( Labor, 


4 


3 


1 


5 


8 


5 


4 


30 


Blank, 




28 


31 


16 


20 


21 


41 


44 


201 


SECRETARY. 




















David T. Clark, 


Democratic, 


385 


643 


211 


141 


332 


304 


175 


2,191 


Harriet D'Orsay, 


Socialist, 


27 


16 


18 


18 


25 


38 


35 


177 


Henry C- Hess, 


( Socialist 
( Labor, 


5 


4 


1 


2 


6 


6 


14 


38 


William G. Merrill, 


Prohibition, 


11 


51 


17 


16 


28 


30 


41 


194 


William M. Olin, 


Republican, 


605 


283 


803 


843 


1,004 


1,172 


1,305 


6,015 


Blank, 




78 


93 


57 


67 


65 


118 


91 


669 


TREASURER AND 


RECEIVER- 


















GENERAL. 




















James H. Bryan, 


Democratic, 


378 


630 


215 


133 


331 


298 


185 


2,170 


James B. Carr, 


Socialist, 


24 


23 


21 


22 


30 


36 


39 


195 


David Craig, 


( Socialist 
( Labor, 


4 


6 


2 


4 


5 


12 


4 


37 


Daniel Parlin, 


Prohibition, 


13 


1 


38 


12 


23 


24 


46 


157 


Elmer A. Stevens, 


Republican, 


611 


341 


762 


848 


997 


1,184 


1,291 


6,034 


Blank, 




81 


89 


69 


68 


74 


114 


96 


591 


AUDITOR. 




















Alexis Boyer, Jr. 


Democratic, 


365 


622 


217 


127 


312 


282 


175 


2,100 


Charles A. Chase, 


Prohibition, 


10 


3 


15 


15 


21 


24 


34 


122 
206 


Sylvester J. McBride, 


Socialist, 


27 


16 


18 


17 


28 


61 


39 


Jeremiah P. McNally, 


( Socialist 
1 Labor, 


7 


34 




2 


3 


24 


7 


77 


Henry E. Turner, 
Blank, 


Republican, 


597 
105 


297 
118 


*782 
75 


837 
89 


993 
103 


1,122 
155 


1,281 
125 


5,909 
770 



454 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 











Wards. 








< 


Candidate. 


Party. 


















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


o 
H 


ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 


















Henry M. Dean, 


Prohibition, 


25 


11 


20 


31 


26 


38 


49 


200 


John A. Fredrikson, 


Socialist Labor, 


9 


8 


1 


9 


11 


11 


12 


61 


Dana Malone, 


Republican, 


592 


323 


770 


788 


926 


1,126 


1,232 


5,757 


Harvey N. Shepard, 


Democratic, 


370 


612 


225 


158 


368 


329 


206 


2,268 


John Weaver Sherman, 


Socialist, 


29 


24 


21 


24 


29 


45 


44 


216 


Blank, 




86 


112 


70 


77 


100 


119 


118 


682 


COUNCILLOR. 




















Charles E. Butterworth, 


Socialist, 


38 


52 


36 


36 


57 


69 


78 


366 


Celdon B. Foster, 


Democratic, 


378 


615 


229 


167 


357 


325 


224 


2,295 


Walter S. Glidden, 


Republican, 


594 


300 


755 


787 


935 


1,120 


1,220 


5,711 


Charles A. Grimmons, 












1 






1 


Blank, 




101 


123 


87 


97 


110 


154 


139 


811 


SENATOR. 




















Charles V. Blanchard, 


Republican, 


572 


331 


789 


808 


989 


1,179 


1,294 


5,962 


Orton D. Field, 


Socialist, 


30 


23 


27 


45 


35 


48 


54 


262 


George A. Glidden, 


Democratic, 


395 


630 


223 


148 


338 


323 


206 


2,263 


William L. Barber, 












1 






1 


Blank, 




114 


106 


68 


86 


97 


118 


107 


696 


REPRESENTATIVES, 


25TH DIST. (3) 


















Guy R. Anderson, 


Democratic, 


364 




232 


167 


332 






1,095 


William M. Armstrong, 


Republican, 


562 




789 


770 


958 






3,079 


William N. Cartwright, 


Democratic, 


317 




191 


131 


280 






919 


Lewis N. Gilman, 


Socialist, 


40 




35 


38 


40 






153 


Sidney B. Keene, 


Republican , 


542 




732 


748 


905 






2,927 


Edward C. Monahan, 


Democratic, 


298 




190 


112 


281 






881 


John L. Mulholland, 


Socialist, 


30 




19 


23 


30 






102 


Thomas R. Taylor, 


Socialist, 


34 




26 


27 


41 






128 


Charles L. Underhill, 


Republican, 


548 




754 


751 


925 






2,978 


Herman Barker, 












1 






1 


Richard E. Pickthal, 












1 






1 


Jesse S. Newcomb, 












1 






1 


Blank, 




598 




353 


494 


585 






2,030 


REPRESENTATIVES, 


26TH DIST. (3) 


















William Brown, 


Democratic, 




632 








421 


276 


1,329 


Zebedee E. Cliff, 


Republican, 




353 








1,129 


1,308 


2,790 


Leon M. Conwell, 


Republican, 




350 








1,143 


1,199 


2,692 


Nicholas H. Flynn, 


Socialist, 




113 








78 


67 


258 


Clayton S. Hunt, 


Socialist, 




81 








79 


79 


239 


Richard Pigott, 


Socialist, 




42 








60 


53 


155 


William L. Waugh, 


Republican, 




330 








1,086 


1,184 


2,600 


Blank, 






1,369 








1,008 


817 


3,194 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER. 


















Patrick Conlon, 


Democratic, 


363 


626 


202 


123 


311 


336 


160 


2,121 


Robert J. Kelley, 


Socialist, 


32 


59 


22 


21 


31 


36 


78 


279 


Samuel 0. Upham, 


Republican, 


587 


271 


794 


828 


1,008 


1,130 


1,262 


5,880 


Blank, 




129 


134 


89 


115 


110 


166 


161 


904 


COUNTY TREASURER. 


















Joseph 0. Hayden, 


Republican, 


601 


345 


7J83 


827 


1,014 


1,173 


1,285 


6,028 


Anson B. Hobbs, 


Socialist, 


38 


24 


23 


24 


35 


41 


47 


232 


Dexter C. Whittimore, 


Democratic, 


343 


576 


219 


132 


289 


291 


182 


2,032 


Newton E. Cutler, 












1 






1 


Blank, 




129 


145 


82 


104 


121 


163 


147 


891 



CITY CLEKK. 



455 



The following is a statement of the votes cast in the sev- 
eral wards of the city for the candidates for the various offices, 
and on the question of granting licenses for the sale of intoxi- 
cating liquors in this city, at the city election held December 14, 
1909:— 









Wards 








< 


Candidate. Party. 


































1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


o 
H 


MAYOR 


















John F. Foster, ) Independent, 

( Citizens, 
Thomas M. Nolan, Democratic, 
Squire E. Putney, Socialist, 
John M. Woods, Republican, 
Arthur P. Vinal, 
J. Frank Mixer, 
Blank, 


221 

293 

18 

479 

34 


99 

423 

8 

253 

13 


204 

112 

9 

478 

31 


165 
95 
10 

467 
1 

14 


264 

212 

25 

655 

1 

26 


227 

178 

14 

689 

7 


451 
81 
16 

678 

20 


1,631 

1,394 

100 

3,699 

1 

1 

135 


ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, WARD 1. 


















John H. Concannon, Democratic, 
Leslie E. A. Smith, Republican, 
Thomas R. Taylor, Socialist, 
Francis P. Garland, 
Blank, 


368 

524 

36 

117 


417 

203 

19 

157 


136 

555 

20 

113 


105 

538 

25 

84 


255 

711 

28 

2 

187 


191 

709 
35 

180 


99 

922 

46 

179 


1,571 

4,162 

209 

2 

1,017 


ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, WARD 2. 


















Nicholas H. Flynn, Socialist, 
Paul R. Valentine, Republican, 
Blank, 


126 
533 
386 


140 
347 
309 


59 
572 
193 


48 
557 
147 


100 
760 
323 


89 
744 

282 


88 
916 
242 


650 
4,4-29 
1,882 


ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, WARD 3. 


















William E. Copithorne, Republican, 
Duane T. Whitney, Socialist, 
Blank, 


544 

92 

409 


299 

80 

417 


644 
55 

125 


568 

39 

145 


760 

79 

344 


751 

72 
292 


887 

97 

262 


4,453 

514 

1,994 


ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, WARD 4. 


















Orton D. Field, Socialist, 
Ray R. Rideout, Republican, 
Francis P. Garland, 
Blank, 


86 
554 

405 


89 
264 

443 


52 
576 

196 


48 
604 

100 


90 

760 

2 

331 


69 

747 

299 


75 
903 

268 


509 

4,408 

2 

2,042 


ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, WARD 5. 


















Lewis N. Gilman, Socialist, 
Alphonso A. Wyman, Republican, 
Francis P. Garland, 
Blank, 


94 

548 

403 


P0 
256 

460 


44 

579 

201 


40 
564 

148 


92 
810 

12 
269 


106 
715 

294 


70 

886 

290 


526 

4,358 

12 

2,065 


ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, WARD 6. 


















Charles E. Blaisdell, Socialist, 
Edgar A. Smith, Republican, 
Francis P. Garland, 
Blank, 


87 
555 

403 


84 
264 

448 


44 

581 

199 


46 
559 

147 


75 

760 

1 

347 


83 
821 

211 


95 
892 

259 


514 

4,432 

1 

2,014 


ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, WARD 7. 


















Jesse E. Perry, Republican, 
Richard Pigott, Socialist, 
Blank, 


527 

97 

421 


264 

80 

452 


570 

43 

211 


551 

41 

160 


746 

76 

361 


746 

63 

306 


1,005 

91 

150 


4,409 

491 

2,061 



456 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Candidate. 



Party. 



WARD ALDERMEN (2) WARD 1. 



Ernest F. Flagg, 
Fred E. Hanley, 
William H. Smith, 
Blank, 



Democratic, 
Republican, 
Republican, 



WARD ALDERMEN (2) WARD 2. 

Walter W. Burke, Republican, 

Joseph A. Haley, Democratic, 

William Eaton Musgrave, Republican, 
Edmond Russell, Democratic, 

Blank, 



WARD ALDERMEN (2) WARD 3. 



Charles W. Boyer, 
Frank R. Dunklee, 
Edward J. Crimmings, 
Blank, 



Republican, 
Republican, 



WARD ALDERMEN (2) WARD 4. 



William N. Cartwright, 
Charles W. Hodgdon, 
William P. Jones, 
Blank, 



Democratic, 
Republican, 
Republican, 



WARD ALDERMEN (2) WARD 5. 



Thomas W. Burke, 
Ellsworth Fisk, 
Gerald A. Gardner, 
John J. Ryan, 
Francis P. Garland, 
Charles W. Rugg, 
Blank, 



Democratic, 
Republican, 
Republican, 
Democratic, 



WARD ALDERMEN (2) WARD 6. 



Oscar H. B elding, 
Joseph O. Knox, 
Bernard J. Sheridan, 
Blank, 



Republican, 
Republican, 
Democratic, 



WARD ALDERMEN (2) WARD 7. 



William B. Brown, 
Ralph M. Smith, 
Blank, 



Republican, 
Republican, 



Wards. 



418 
551 

483 

638 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2yrs.) WARD 1, 



Henry F. Curtis, 
Mary G. Whiting, 
Blank, 



Republican, 
Independent, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2yrs.) WARD 2 



Daniel H. Bradley, 
Edward F. Sherman, 
Blank, 



Democratic, 
Republican, 



192 
472 
174 
472 
282 



573 

544 

1 

530 



464 

561 

78 



104 
522 
509 
369 



226 
619 
644 
252 
229 
1 
395 



692 
764 
262 
512 



938 
892 
662 



474 
189 
183 



418 
551 
483 
638 



192 
472 
174 
472 
282 



573 

544 

1 

530 



104 
522 
509 
369 



226 
619 
644 
252 
229 
1 
395 



692 
764 
262 
512 



938 

892 
662 



464 
561 

78 



474 
189 
133 






OITT CLERK, 



457 



Candidate. 



Party. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE(2yrs.)WARD3. 



George E. Whitaker, 
Denis I. Crimmings, 
Leila C. Pennock, 
Blank, 



Republican, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2 yrs.)WARD 4 

Albert H. Benson, Democratic, 

Charles A. Kirkpatrick, Jr., Republican, 
Blank, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEES yrs.) WARD 5 



Henry H. Folsom, 
Patrick H. Ryan, 
Alfred Murphy, 
Blank, 



Republican, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2yrs.)WARD 6. 

Frederick A. P. Fiske, Republican, 
Blank, 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2yrs.) WARD 7. 

George C. Mahoney, Republican, 

Blank, 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (lyr.) WARD 7. 
(to fill vacancy) 

Harry G. Chase, Republican, 

I Republican 
Independent 
Nom. Paper. 
Blank, 

SHALL LICENSES BE GRANTED 
FOR THE SALE OF INTOXICAT- 
ING LIQUORS IN THIS CITY? 

Number of " Yes " votes, 
Number of " No " votes, 
Blank, 







Wards 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


357 

582 
106 


446 

255 

95 


645 
1 
3 

179 

202 

592 

30 


100 

568 

89 

118 

590 

44 


893 
1 
1 

299 

276 

816 

91 


858 
263 

258 

770 

87 


1,098 
343 

485 

877 
79 

173 
996 

77 



645 
1 
3 

179 



100 

568 

89 



893 
1 
1 

299 



858 
263 



1,098 
343 



485 

877 

79 



1,830 

4,601 

530 



458 



ANNUAL BEPOKTS. 



Liquor License Question. 

The following is a statement of the votes, during the several 
years of its submission to the people, on the question of granting 
licenses for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this city, together 
with the number of registered voters and the estimated popula- 
tion for each year : — 



Ykar. 


Yes. 


No. 


Blank. 


Registered 
Voters. 


Estimated 
Population. 


1881 


979 


1,222 




3,678 


26,000 


1882 


627 


1,159 




3,778 


26,500 


1883 


767 


1,343 




4 407 


27,000 


1884 


806 


1,709 




4,470 


28,000 


1885 


428 


1,604 




3,969 


♦29,992 


1886 


214 


1,321 




4,089 


32,000 


1887 


555 


2,427 




4,574 


34,000 


1888 


744 


2,456 




5,399 


36,000 


1889 


635 


1,706 


335 


5,286 


39,000 


1890 


999 


2,282 


409 


5,556 


♦40,117 


1891 


1,054 


2,598 


279 


5,938 


43,000 


1892 


1,427 


3,288 


347 


7,587 


46,000 


1893 


1,547 


2,654 


218 


7,943 


48,000 


1894 


1,098 


2,869 


246 


8,007 


50,000 


1895 


1,854 


4,708 


459 


8,410 


+52,200 


1896 


1,466 


3,680 


332 


9,379 


54,000 


1897 


1,626 


3,815 


486 


8,925 


56,000 


1898 


1,595 


3,501 


486 


8,657 


57,500 


1899 


1,892 


3,340 


374 


8,838 


60,000 


1900 


1,660 


3,427 


321 


9,620 


♦61,643 


1901 


1,579 


3,295 


374 


9,499 


63,500 


1902 


1,645 


3,242 


360 


10,100 


65,000 


1903 


2,248 


4,410 


550 


11,346 


67,000 


1904 


2,022 


4,338 


447 


11,682 


69,500 


1905 


2,483 


4,660 


531 


11,340 


*69,272 


1906 


2,193 


5,204 


582 


11,671 


70,000 


1907 


1,735 


4,591 


459 


11,558 


74,000 


1908 


1,780 


4,760 


491 


12,777 


75,500 


1909 


1,830 


4,601 


530 


12,479 


75,500 



* Census. 



ORDINANCES. 



Somerville, January 1, 1910. 
The following ordinances have been adopted since the 
printing of the annual reports for the year 1908: — 

No. 73. 

An Ordinance to Prohibit Passing Upon, Over or Across Reserved 

Spaces in the Streets. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville, 
as follows: — 

Section 1. No person shall, unless authorized so to do by law or 
as an employee of the city, cause or allow a wagon, sleigh or other 
vehicle to pass upon, over or across any space heretofore or hereafter 
reserved in a street or way under the provisions of section 85 of chap- 
ter 48 of the Revised Laws of Massachusetts, or under other statutes 
applicable to such reserved spaces. 

Section 2. No person shall, unless authorized so to do by law or 
as an employee of the city, pass upon, over or across any space hereto- 
fore or hereafter reserved in a street or way under the provisions of 
section 85 of chapter 48 of the Revised Laws of Massachusetts or 
under other statutes applicable to such reserved spaces. 

Section 3. Whoever violates a provision of this ordinance shall be 
liable to a penalty of not more than twenty dollars for each offence. 

Section 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved May 28 ) 1909. 

No. 74. 

An Ordinance in Relation to Electric Motors and Engines. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville, 
as follows: — 
Section 1. Section 1 of Ordinance No. 62 is hereby amended by 
inserting in the first line after the word motor, the words, "exceeding 
two horse power." 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved May 28, 1909. 

No. 75. 
Ordinance Relating to the Picking, Sorting and Storage of Rags, 
Waste Rubber or Waste Papers. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville, 
as follows: — 

Section 1. No person shall use, occupy, or maintain any build- 
ing in this city for the purpose of picking, sorting, or storage of rags 
therein without a license from the Board of Aldermen. No person 
shall pick, sort, or store rags in any building without a license from 
the Board of Aldermen. No person shall pick, sort, or store rags in 
any building used for habitation. No person shall pick, sort, or store 
rags in or upon any lot oi land within 300 feet of any building. The 
Chief Engineer of the Fire Department is hereby empowered to make 
such regulations to be observed by the person named in the license, his 
employees, agents, and servants, as to the use of the building and the 



460 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

premises upon which the same is situated, and otherwise, as he may 
deem proper. 

Section 2. No person shall use, occupy, or maintain any building 
in this city for the purpose of picking, sorting, or storage of waste 
rubber or waste papers therein without a license from the Board of 
Aldermen. No person shall pick, sort, or store waste rubber or waste 
papers in any building without a license from the Board of Aldermen. 
No person shall pick, sort, or store waste rubber or waste papers in 
any building used for habitation. No person shall pick, sort, or store 
waste rubber or waste papers in or upon any lot of land within 300 feet 
of any building. The Chief Engineer of the Fire Department is hereby 
empowered to make such regulations to be observed by the person 
named in the license, his employees, agents, and servants, as to the 
use of the building and the premises upon which the same is situated, 
and otherwise, as he may deem proper. 

Section 3. In no case shall the license under the preceding sections 
be granted until after a notice of the application for such license has 
been published in one or more newspapers in the City of Somerville, 
and a public hearing given to all persons interested therein. 

Section 4. Any license granted under the provisions of this ordi- 
nance may be revoked at any time by the Board of Aldermen with or 
without notice to the licensee. 

If any person violates a regulation made by the Chief Engineer of 
the Fire Department under the authority above given, his license shall 
thereupon become null and void. 

Section 5. Any person licensed by the Board of Aldermen of this 
city to keep a shop for the purchase, sale, or barter of junk shall not 
be required to obtain a license under this ordinance. 

Section 6. The fee for a license under the provisions of this ordi- 
nance shall be ten dollars. 

Section 7. Whoever violates a provision of this ordinance shall be 
liable to a penalty of not more than twenty dollars for each offence. 
Section 8. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved June 14, 1909. 

No. 76. 

An Ordinance Relating to Construction of Buildings. 

(This ordinance has been published for distribution in pamphlet 
form.) 

No. 77. 
An Ordinance to Amend Section 7 of Chapter XVIII of the Revised 

Ordinances of 1900. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville, 
as follows: — 
Section 1. Section 7 of Chapter XVIII of the Revised Ordinances 
of 1900 is hereby amended by striking out the word "ten" in the third 
line, and inserting in place thereof the word six, and by striking out the 
word '"twenty-two" in the second line, and inserting in place thereof 
the word twenty-four. 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect December 1, 1909. 

Passed November 26, 1909. 
Frederic W. Cook, 

City Clerk. 



JURY LIST OF THE CITY OF SOflERVlLLE. 



Prepared by the Registrars of Voters, June 24, 1909. 



Abbott, Alonzo F., 8 Concord avenue, Shipper. 

Ackerman, Herman E., 14 Bay State avenue, Shoe jobber. 

Adams, Arthur E., 74 Bay State avenue, Head bookkeeper. 

Adams, Charles M., 22 Highland road, Claim adjuster. 

Adams, Charles S., 9 Holyoke road, Traveling salesman. 

Adcock, John H., 205 Highland avenue, Plumber. 

Ainsworth, Fred W., 390-A Highland avenue, Broker real estate. 

Alexander, Harrison B., 6 Dartmouth street, Brakeman. 

Allen, J. Edward, 52 Hall avenue, Manager. 

Alletzhausser, Frederick, 9 Wheatland street, Jeweler. 

Allison, James W., 95 Mt. Vernon street, Carpenter. 

Amee, Albert F., 17 Russell street, Stationer. 

Andrews, Francis H., 27 Knowlton street, Brakeman. 

Andrews, Horace W., 172 Broadway, Builder. 

Appel, Charles A., 45 Willow avenue, Office manager. ' 

Appley, Josiah H., 40 Brastow avenue, Gas fitter. 

Armstrong, David B., 25 Lincoln avenue, Plumber. 

Arnold, E. Olney, 56 School street, Carpet cleaner. 

Arrington, William F., 37 Walnut street, Proof reader. 

Ashton, Albert C, 33 Columbus avenue, Treasurer. 

Ashworth, Fred N., 104 Cross street, Manufacturer. 

Atkins, Henry M., 41 Bay State avenue, Messenger. 

Atkinson, Thomas, 69 Highland road, Insurance superintendent. 

Attwood, J. Lorenzo, 12 Park avenue, Bookkeeper. 

Atwater, George W., 1 Avon street, Foreman. 

Atwood, Horace F., 38 Windsor road, Accountant. 

Avery, J. Edward, 55 Derby street, Clerk. 

Ayer, Fred C, 157 Highland avenue, Lumber dealer. 

Aylward, William P., 5 Cameron avenue, Grocer. 

B 

Babcock, Cyrus W., 23 Chandler street, Box maker. 

Bacon, Fred C, 78 Marshall street, Gentlemen's furnishings dealer. 

Baier, Fred J., 7 Shawmut place, Electrician. 

Baird, James E., 454-A Medford street, Milk dealer. 

Baker, Charles T., 93 Munroe street, Upholsterer. 

Baker, Jacob, 38 Pritchard avenue, Paperhanger. 

Baker, Nicholas, 9 Bedford street, Cooper. 

Baldwin, Edwin C, 83 Curtis street, Bookkeeper. 

Bancroft, Edward A., 31 School street, Barrel dealer. 

Barber, William L., 36 Marshall street, Clerk. 

Barber, William M., 82 Munroe street, Inventor. 

Barker, Edgar C, 12 Ellsworth street, Clerk. 

Barker, James A., 140 School street, Clerk. 

Barnard, Alexander G., 209 Willow avenue, Messenger. 

Barnes, Edmund K., 77 Lexington avenue, Druggist. 

Barnes, Frank, 24 Milton street, Box manufacturer. 

Baron, Benjamin F., 7 Quincy street, Machinist. 

Barr, George S., 27 Electric avenue, Salesman. 

Barstow, William N., 37 Francesca avenue, Salesman. 



462 ANNUAL EEPOETg. 

Bartlett, George E., 5 North Union street, Machinist. 

Barton, George S., 18 Dana street, Designer. 

Batchelder, George W., 20 Madison street, Foreman. 

Bateman, Charles R., 1228 Broadway, Driver. 

Bateman, Louis O., 72 Highland road, Shoe clerk. 

Bates, Roscoe E., 34 Jay street, Engineer. 

Baxter, Charles H., Jr., 1 Thurston street, Clerk. 

Bean, Gerard D., 136 Lowell street, Bookkeeper. 

Bean, John D., 3 Lincoln street, Teamster. 

Beandet, Edward P., 1 Chester avenue, Clerk. 

Beckley, Henry F., 221 Morrison avenue, Salesman. 

Belcher, Albert W., 57 Highland road, Traveling salesman. 

Belden, Lawrence A., 40 School street, Gentlemen's furnishings dealer. 

Bellows, George M., 611 Broadway, Piano salesman. 

Belt, Robert M., 51 Curtis street, Superintendent. 

Bennett, Daniel J., 37 Stone avenue, Harness maker. 

Bennett, George H., 15 Pritchard avenue, Machinist. 

Bennett, Herbert E., 13 Charnwood road, Heating engineer. 

Bent, J. Fletcher, 51 Hall avenue, Clerk. 

Bentley, George W., 19 Adams street, Commission merchant. 

Benway, Charles H., 66 Fremont street, Real estate agent. 

Benwell, Flarry A., 103 Hancock street, Stenographer. 

Berglind, John E., 53 Dickinson street, Machinist. 

Berry, Andrew C, 6 Centre street, Engraver. 

Berry, Arthur W., 53 Hudson street, Builder. 

Berton, John F., 154 Morrison avenue, Painter. 

Bigley, William J., 157 College avenue, Merchant. 

Billings, George A., 75 Willow avenue, Collector. 

Bishop, Thomas J., 70 Flint street, Expressman. 

Bishop. William F., 20 Wheeler street, Bookkeeper. 

Blair, John H., 54 Gilman street, Bookkeeper. 

Blake, Charles S., 19 Banks street, Jeweler. 

Blake, Frank R., 21 Derby street, Machinist. 

Blanchard, C. Frederick, 2 Curtis avenue, Real estate agent. 

Bliss, Winthrop R., 66 Putnam street, Life insurance agent. 

Blondell, Richard A. L., 82 Pearson avenue, Foreman. 

Bolton, Harry P., 10 Crescent street, Expressman. 

Bond, Percy C, 18 Summit avenue, Builder. 

Boodry, George R., 26 Josephine avenue, Stereotyper. 

Booth, William G., 51 College avenue, Designer. 

Bossey, Thomas F., Ill Elm street, No occupation. 

Bosworth, James D., 9 Teele avenue, Electrician. 

Bosworth, William H., 10 Powder House terrace, Advertising mgr. 

Boulter, Joseph B., 23 Bow street, Cabinet maker. 

Bourne, Phillips .P., 191 Summer street, Engineer. 

Boutillier, Ernest G., 41 Ash avenue, Clerk. 

Beckman, Frank W., 41 Stone avenue, Foreman. 

Bowdren, Michael J., 39 Maple street, Nurse. 

Bowker, Frank P., 31 Avon street, Salesman. 

Bowlby, James L., 3 Harvard place, Teamster. 

Bowman, F. Elmore, 65 Elm street, Optician. 

Boyce, Joseph P., 78 Liberty avenue, Cigar manufacturer. 

Boyd, Everett W,, 147 Powder House boulevard, Salesman. 

Boyer, George R., 29 Wieglesworth street, Builder. 

Brack, Frederick, 33 Cambria street, Insurance agent. 

5 raC £ ett ' Harr y E > 46 Cedar street, Salesman. 

Bradbury, John J., 52 Adams street, Provision dealer. 

Bradley, Daniel A., 67 Beacon street, Piano finisher. 

Brastow, George K., 162 Summer street, Insurance broker. 

Braxton, Robert S., 29-A Walter street, Teamster. 



JURY LIST 1 . 463 

Breck, Walter W., 79 Thurston street, Bookkeeper. 

Bremiier, John A., 49 Bow street, Picture frame manufacturer. 

Brewer, George C, 170 Summer street, Cigar salesman. 

Bridges, Allie C, 17 Glendale avenue, Electrician. 

Briggs, 'j. Albion, 59 Vinal avenue, Real estate agent. 

Brigham, Walter J., 37 Charnwood road, Collector. 

Brine, Charles F., 36 Columbus avenue, Tailor. 

Brine, Henry C, 21 Greene street, Dry goods dealer. 

Broadhead, William H., 86 School street, Electrician. 

Brock, John F., 10 Ossipee road, Produce dealer. 

Brodil, William A., 7 Greenville street, Tailor. 

Brown, Burton S., 706 Broadway, Accountant. 

Brown, C. Leonard, 38 Wallace street, Civil engineer. 

Brown, Duncan, 23 Cedar street, Printer. 

Brown, George E., 14 Grand View avenue, Woolens dealer. 

Brown, Linwood G., 4 Taunton street, Carpenter. 

Brown, Lyman H., 32 Stone avenue, Livery stable keeper. 

Brown, William I., 67 Boston street, Treasurer. 

Brownlee, Edward J., 34 Ash avenue, Shipper. 

Brownville, Edwin A., 20 Hall street, Unemployed. 

Bruneau, Eugene, 4 Putnam street, Photographer. 

Bryant, Oliver S., 29 Aberdeen road, Weigher. 

Buchert, L. Philip, 42 Victoria street, Superintendent. 

Bucknam, William E., Jr., 99 Hudson street, Clerk. 

BufTum, Charles F., 21 Hudson street, Tailor. 

Bullard, Elijah C, 243-A Highland avenue, Superintendent. 

Bullard, Walter H., 22 Stickney avenue, No occupation. 

Burbank, Ernest W., 98 Hudson street, Yard master. 

Burckes, Arthur L., 20 Sargent avenue, Clerk. 

Burgess, Sterns W v 32 Rogers avenue, Electrician. 

Burgess, William H., 38 Cambria street, Bond salesman. 

Burke, James E., 41 Derby street, Commission merchant. 

Burnham, Arthur W., 66 Rogers avenue, Traveling salesman. 

Burns, Paul S., 53 Willow avenue, Assistant manager. 

Burroughs, Edwin F., 24 Park avenue, Paymaster. 

Burrows, Joseph C, 39 Ossipee road, Dentist. 

Burtnett, Eugene A. F., 39 Ware street, Bookkeeper. 

Burton, Walter, 2 Homer square, Artist. 

Butler, James A., 162 Lowell street, Real estate agent. 

Butters, Charles S., 51 Church street, Provision dealer. 

Butters, Harold A., 48 Putnam street, Salesman. 

Butterworth, Elwell R., 35 Pearl street, Assistant superintendent. 

Byrns, Ernest H., 67 Walnut street, Electrician. 



Cadwallader, Thomas J., 3 Lawson terrace, Clerk. 
Cahalan, Charles W., 89 Heath street, Master plumber. 
Cahoon, Benjamin B., 46 Mystic avenue, Telephone manager. 
Callaghan, Thomas J., 39 Poplar street, Yard master. 
Callow, John R., 42 Concord avenue, Car inspector. 
Cameron, George B., 170 Powder House boulevard, Carpenter. 
Campbell, Henry F., 414 Medford street, Agent. 
Campbell, William J., 19 Putnam street, Machinist. 
Cann, Albert T., 38 Craigie street, Restaurant keeper. 
Cannon, Joseph J., 25 Shawmut street, Salesman. 
Card, Frederick L., 243 Pearl street, Provision dealer. 
Carey, Alfred E., 19 Newbury street, Carriage painter. 
Carlton, Fred I., 100 Porter street, Pattern maker. 
Carmody, Eugene M., 383 Medford street, Salesman. 



464 ANNUAL REPOTS. 

Carpenter, Adelbert B., 58 Central street, Commission merchant. 

Carpenter, Allen F., 22 Laurel street, Grocer. 

Carpenter, George O., 62 Highland avenue, Salesman. 

Carr, Charles H., 58 Lowden avenue, Compositor. 

Carr, Eugene P., 18 Benton road, Manufacturing jeweler. 

Carr, Fred M., 12 Westwood road, Manufacturing jeweler. 

Carr, Roy W., 130 College avenue, Confectioner. 

Carrick, Samuel P., 271 Medford street, Editor. 

Carter, Horace C, 123 Walnut street, Musician. 

Cartwright, William N., 262 Broadway, Agent. 

Carvill, Sewell A., 28 Highland avenue, Salesman. 

Casseau, Charles H., 17 Charnwood road, Ornamental painter. 

Cass, Frank L., 35 Montrose street, Brakeman. 

Castleman, James T., 35 Laurel street, Lodging house keeper 

Caton, Albertiss M., 189 School street, Manager. 

Chamberlin, Horace A., 35 Willow avenue, Salesman. 

Chandler, Leonard B., 45 Jaques street, Milk dealer. 

Chapin, Alonzo B., 11 Mystic street, Collector. 

Chapman, Amasa L., 68 Flint street, Engineer. 

Chase. Washington I., 85 Vine street, Distiller. 

Cheetham. Samuel, 608 Broadway, Machinist. 

Cheever, Albert S., 6 Aldersey street, Division superintendent. 

Cheney, Frederick E., 11 Oakland avenue, Grocer. 

Chickering. William H., 15 Evergreen avenue, Clerk. 

Chisholm, Robert A., 35 Cutter street, Blacksmith. 

Choate, Melville E., 63 W T alnut street, Clerk. 

Christie, Alexander B., 159 Glen street, Truckman. 

Christie, Trott K., 22 Oliver street, Teamster. 

Church, Albert A.. 240-A School street, Printer. 

Churchill, Edsyl, 37 Church street, Freight handler. 

Clark, Charles W., 21 Westminster street, Clerk.' 

Clark, George W., 65 Central street, Cruller manufacturer. 

Clarke, Wilbur S.. 40 Vinal avenue, Bookkeeper. 

Clayton, George H., 60 Mt. Vernon street, Carpenter. 

Clement, Otis S., 160 Highland avenue, Clerk. 

Clifford, Rupert F., 54 Willow avenue, Tea blender. 

Clough, W r arren A., 40 School street, Pattern maker. 

Coan, Thomas S.. 18 Fremont street, Bookkeeper. 

Coffin, Clarence D., 67 Hall avenue, Builder. 

Colby, Alfred E., 128 Powder House boulevard, Bookkeeper. 

Colcord, Albert P., 19 Pritchard avenue, Clerk. 

Cole, Herbert A., 34 Pearl street, Driver. 

Cole, Ivor}' F., 29 Raymond avenue, Carpenter. 

Collieson, Clarence E., 19 Park avenue, Leather dealer. 

Collins, John D., 22 Vine street, Mason. 

Colman, Charles W., 151 Central street, Architect. 

Comfort, James J., 9 Hammond street, Car conductor. 

Comstock, Milo M., 9 Burnside avenue, Confectionery salesman. 

Conant, Clarence T., 147 Hudson street. Milkman. 

Condit, Fred H., 255 Medford street, Musician. 

Conlon, Bernard, 27 Marion street, Laborer. 

Connor, Michael J., 10 Columbus avenue, Tailor. 

Cook, Forrest D., 181 Powder House boulevard, Reporter. 

Copithorne, John, 81 School street, Carpenter. 

Corbett, W r illiam J., 315-A Summer street, Assistant paymaster. 

Corliss, Charles H., 36 Greenville street, Butter dealer. 

Corner, Frank B.. 19 Highland road, Salesman. 

Corwin, Charles J., 195 Highland avenue, Traveling auditor. 

Corwin, Charles R., 169 Summer street, Poultry dealer. 

Couch, William H., Jr., 23 Rogers avenue, Clerk. 



JURY LIST. 465 

Countway, Francis A., 28 Robinson street, Manager and treasurer. 

Cousens, Elmer E., 21 Prospect Hill avenue, Bookkeeper. 

Cowan, John F., 332 Summer street, Typesetter. 

Cox, Edgar M., 303 Washington street, Verifier. 

Cox, Frank H., 21 Wheatland street, Artist. 

Cragie, Frank C, 16 Sycamore street, Electrician. 

Cremen, John W., 69 Oxford street, Janitor. 

Crenner, Bartlett P., 61 Adams street, Leather dealer. 

Crerie, Fred R., 418-A Medford street, Foreman. 

Crispin, Andrew H., Jr., 31 Chandler street, Carpenter. 

Crocker, Charles F., 42 Curtis street, Grocer. 

Crocker, Lancis S. J., 19 Church street, Teamster. 

Cromwell, Joseph H., 209-A Highland avenue, Ship chandler. 

Cross, John A., 10 Lee street, Bookkeeper. 

Crothers, Leon H., 29 Albion street, Snipper. 

Crowell, Albert F., 53 Rogers avenue, Bookkeeper. 

Crowell, Austin, 22 Walnut street, Tailor. 

Crowell, Cutler C, 85 Benton road, Superintendent. 

Crowley, Albert G., 387 Medford street, Clerk. 

Cudworth, Frank N., 29% Alston street, Fireman. 

Cummings, Cecil H., 19 Robinson street, Fruit dealer. 

Cunningham, Thomas A., 60 Beacon street, Grocer. 

Currie, Richard, 35 Windsor road, Insurance agent. 

Cutler, Alfred M., 234 Medford street, Clerk. 

Cutler, Frank E., 44 W r alnut street, Painter. 

Cutter, Frederic R., 64 Vinal avenue, Jeweler. 

Cutter, Irving R., 7 Cutter park, Insurance agent. 

D 

Dadmun, Henry H., 48 Oxford street, Salesman. 

Dadmun, Leon E., 97 Morrison avenue, Photographer. 

Dainty, Henry, 216 School street, Agent. 

Dalton, James H., 39 Hall avenue, Grocer. 

Dame, Levi A., 64 Putnam street, Real estate agent. 

Danforth, George E., 149 Lowell street, Clerk. 

Daniels, Harry F., 21 Munroe street, Stenographer. 

Darby, Frederick C, 48 Mystic avenue, Foreman. 

Dardis, John F., 307 Washington street, Polisher. 

Davenport, Howard H., 86 Munroe street, Assistant treasurer. 

Davis, Albert I., 35 Fairmount avenue, Bookkeeper. 

Davis, Edward A., 9 Holt avenue, Sail maker. 

Davis, George E., 82 Munroe street, Accountant. 

Davis, George M., 20 Arthur street, Mason. 

Davison, George Melville, 59 Victoria street, Steam fitter. 

Dawson, Howard, 70 Albion street, Clerk. 

Day, Eugene H., 39 Hudson street, Machinist. 

Dayton, Francis A., 456 Somerville avenue, Collector. 

Dean, Clarence H., 26 Lowden avenue, Shipper. 

DeCoster, Alvah V., 43 Lowell street, No occupation. 

Dedrick, Clarence H., 94 Josephine avenue, Clerk. 

Delay, James, 48 Beacon street, Florist. 

Dellea, John J., 26 Otis street, Driver. 

Delorme, George F., 29 Trull street, Nickel plater. 

Dennett, John M., 23 William street, Stable keeper. 

Denvir, William E., 197 Summer street, Shipper. 

Despeaux, George W., 51 Craigie street, Telephone collector. 

Dick, David. 36 Newburv street, Sawyer. 

Dickey, W r illiam E., 33 Bromfield road, Clerk. 

Dillaby, Charles P., 96 Munroe street, Draughtsman. 



466 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Dillon, Eli T., 11 Grand View avenue, Bookkeeper. 
Dinsmore, Fred C, 8 Arthur street, Grain dealer. 
Dion, Francis M., 144 Willow avenue, Fruit salesman. 
Dobinson, William J., 22 Greene street, Photo engraver. 
Dodge, Edwin G., 21 Benedict street, Photographer. 
Doherty, Bernard A., 11 Crocker street, Bookkeeper. 
Doherty, Cornelius A., 75 Cross street, Milk dealer. 
Dolben, William H., 5 Ossipee road, Merchanical engineer. 
Dolliver, Edwin C, 176 Summer street, Produce dealer. 
Donaldson, Charles A., 153 Glen street, Engineer. 
Donhell, Eugene D., 112 Packard avenue, Clerk. 
Dooling, David H., 306 Washington street, Painter. 
Doten, Herbert W., 115 Glenwood road, Furniture dealer. 
Dougherty, John E., 7 Oak street, Shipper. 
Douglas. Charles E. M., 144 Lowell street, Salesman. 
Dowd, Thomas, 50 Fellsway West, Plasterer. 
Downer, Frank O., 181 Medford street, Railroad police. 
Downing, John L., 22 Hamlet street, Shipper. 
Doyle, Edgar W., 29 Berkeley street, Clerk. 
Drake, George H., 21 Highland avenue, Inspector. 
Dresser, George H., 193 School street, Superintendent. 
Drew, Frank M., 56 College avenue, Foreman. 
Drinkwater, Frank M., 872 Broadway, Salesman. 
Drouet, E. Charles, 66 Walnut street, Real estate dealer. 
Duncan, John, 2 Brastow avenue, Manufacturer. 
Dunham, George J., 365 Broadway, Automobile dealer. 
Dunham, Marshall W., 365 Broadway, Bicycle dealer. 
Dustin, Harry N., 40 Church street, Clerk. 
Dykeman, William A., 60 Marshall street, Architect. 

E 

Eames, Henry H., 11 Chapel street, Machinist. 

Earle, Lewis B., 87 Irving street, Clerk. 

Easter, William A., 27 Milton street, Electrician. 

Eastman, Ulysses G., 53 Pritchard avenue, Carpenter. 

Eaton, Arthur W., 12 Westminster street, Salesman. 

Eaton, Charles H., 5 Ellsworth street, Teamster. 

Edgerly, Frank C, 17 Veazie street, Milk dealer. 

Edgarton, Earle B., 157 Lowell street, Journalist. 

Edkins, Arthur, 5 Mountain avenue, Shipper. 

Edmands, John S., 15 Central street, Draughtsman. 

Edmond, George A., 10 Wesley street, Machinist. 

Edson, Charles A., 9 Dana street, Confectioner. 

Edwards, Edward H., 10 James street, Chiropodist. 

Egerton, Charles S., 63 Boston street, Cigar dealer. 

Eich, John W., 32 Holyoke road, Chemist. 

Elie, Rudolph F., 35 Fenwick street, Optician. 

Elkins, John F., 142 Medford street, Contractor. _ 

Elliett, Walter S., 132 Boston avenue, Stereotyper. 

Elliot, Charles J., 59 Oxford street, Civil engineer. 

Elliot, Reed L., 40 Columbus avenue, Architect. 

Elliott, George E., 103 Glenwood road, Assessor and salesman. 

Elliott, Waldo F., 174 Walnut street, Storehouse manager. 

Elwell, D. Jerome, 16 Conwell avenue, Artist. 

Emerson, Waldo S., 32 Moreland street, Plumber. 

Emerson, William J., 104 Broadway, Boot and shoe dealer. 

Emery, Everett C, 5 Columbus avenue, Clerk. 

Emery, George W., 27 Albion street, Draughtsman. 

Epps, Albert E., 25 Cedar street, Clerk. 



JURY LIST. 40? 



Estabrook, Delbert W., 11 Robinson street, Foreman. 
Estey, Clarence A., 16 Highland avenue, Railroad clerk. 
Esty, Austin S., 203 School street, Manager. 
Eustace, James D., 205 Broadway, Salesman. 
Evans, E. Montrose, 11 Pearson road, Pharmacist. 
Everett, Percival H., 16 Packard avenue, Civil engineer. 



Fairfield, Herbert E., 12 Lovell street, Bookkeeper. 

Fales, Elisha B., 746 Broadway, Bookkeeper. 

Fales, Silas P., 120 Central street, Traveling salesman. 

Fallen, John F., 7 Beach avenue, Junk dealer. 

Farmer, Luke W., 92 Thurston street, Commission merchant 

Farnsworth, Frank E., 283-R Broadway, Artist. 

Farrar, Willard S., 12 Adams street, Grocer. 

Farrell, Robert J., 21 Avon street, Tea dealer. 

Farwell, Robert B., 62 Vinal avenue, Civil engineer. . 

Farwell, Ruleffe H., 92 Central street, Pressman. 

Fash, Reuben A., 14 Wheeler street, Confectioner. 

Felch, Lewis E., 10 Giles park, Salesman. 

Felt, Irwin S., 36 Bay State avenue, Lunch room proprietor. 

Fenelon, Charles P., 36 Beacon street, Manager. 

Ferguson, Herbert J., 12 Ibbetson street, Stock clerk. 

Fermoyle, William J., 11 Pleasant avenue, Painter. 

Fernald, Edgar A., 140 Central street, Bookkeeper. 

Fewkes, Charles H., 702 Broadway, Engraver. 

Fickett, Edward W., 24 Elston street, Clerk. 

Fickinger, Frank A., 76 W'inslow avenue, Broker. 

Field, William W\, 21 Milton street, Pattern maker. 

Fife, John F., 17 Cutter avenue. Stationary engineer. 

Fillebrown, Arthur M., 15 Buckingham street, Machinist. 

Finn, William, 502 Broadway, Pressman. 

Finney, Nathaniel G., 632 Somerville avenue, Painter. 

Fish, Benjamin F., Jr., 24 Boston street, Painter. 

Fish, Delos D., 33 Simpson avenue, Builder. 

Fish, Ozro M., 41 Banks street, Chemist. 

Fisher, Charles, 74 Concord avenue, Gun builder. 

Fisk, William L., 65 Willow avenue, Clerk. 

Fitch, Frank E., 195 School street, Traveling salesman. 

Fitch, George B., 48 Ware street, Tailor. 

Fitch, Nathan H., 21 Wheeler street, Grocer. 

Fitz, Charles E., 43 Thurston street, Hay and grain dealer. 

FitzGerald, William H., 36 Oliver street, Bookkeeper. 

Flagg, George A., 35 Powder House terrace, Stamp dealer. 

Flaherty, Francis E., 261 Washington street, Undertaker. 

Flaherty, James P., 45 Everett avenue, Junk dealer. 

Flanders, George S., 28 Gibbens street, Foreman. 

Fletcher, Arthur, 23 Gibbens street, Bookkeeper. 

Fletcher, Charles L., 1 Aldersey street, Provision dealer. 

Fletcher, John E., 81 Walnut street, Collector. 

Flint, Frederick W., 19 Hinckley street, Painter. 

Flint, Lester E., 22 Dover street, Clerk. 

Flynn, Dennis F., 67 Dane street, Upholsterer. 

Flynn, William P., 31 Linden street, Machine helper. 

Foley, William L., 109 Cedar street, Bank clerk. 

Folger, Walter M., 13 Henry avenue, Draughtsman. 

Forbush, Horace A., 31 Bradley street, Salesman. 

Ford, Charles S., 11 Grove street, Canvasser. 

Fosdick, Herbert W., 17 Grand View avenue, Salesman. 



468 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Foster, Elmer E., 10 Broadway place, Fireman. 

Foster, John B., 66 Irving street, Artist. 

Foster, Willie F., 56 Curtis street, Bookkeeper. 

Fowler, Charles P., 35 Hamlet street, Foreman and collector. 

Fowler, Frank L., 181 Powder House boulevard, Pressman. 

Fowler, Harris H., 65 Cross street, Elevator constructor. 

Fox, John, 28 Linden street, Laborer. 

Freeman, Maurice J., 33 Walter street, Grocer. 

Freeze, Frank E., 39 Ossipee road, Furniture broker. 

French, Alonzo W., 188 Willow avenue, Oyster salesman. 

French, Charles R., 46 Linden avenue, Salesman. 

French, Winfred H., 44 Dana street, Salesman. 

Friend, Frank C, 64 Highland road, Real estate dealer. 

Frink, William A., 5 Irving street, Undertaker. 

Frisbee, Howard, 272 Willow avenue, Stationer. 

Frisbie, Percy C, 25 Ossipee road, Clerk. 

Frost, Fred A., 27 Pearson road, Clerk. 

Frost, Thomas, 47 Pearl street, Storekeeper. 

Frye, Daniel M., 222 Highland avenue, Secretary. 

Fryer, John J., 29 Hall avenue, Bookkeeper. 

Fudge, Edward J., 4